Source: COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY submitted to
DEVELOPING NON-CHEMICAL HARVEST WEED SEED CONTROL STRATEGIES IN DRYLAND CROPS
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
EXTENDED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
1021176
Grant No.
2019-70006-30438
Project No.
COL0-2019-02959
Proposal No.
2019-02959
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
ARDP
Project Start Date
Sep 1, 2019
Project End Date
Apr 30, 2023
Grant Year
2019
Project Director
Gaines, T.
Recipient Organization
COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY
(N/A)
FORT COLLINS,CO 80523
Performing Department
Bioag Science and Pest Mgmt
Non Technical Summary
This is an ARDP research (single-function) project addressing the CPPM focus area of Plant Protection Tools and Tactics. Our main goal is to determine the efficacy of chaff lining as a non-chemical integrated weed management approach. We will focus on field and greenhouse research repeated in multiple states representing the Central Great Plains.Multiple stakeholder groups have identified diversifying weed management, improving management of herbicide resistant weeds, and seed bank management as high priorities. Several candidate strategies are available for harvest weed seed control, a non-chemical approach to destroy or remove weed seeds at crop harvest and reduce weed seed contribution to the seedbank. Our objective in this proposal is to evaluate the effectiveness of a relatively new and least expensive method, called chaff lining, and compare it to the most expensive method, the harvester integrated seed destructor. We propose to conduct this research using field-scale experiments in dryland crop systems including winter wheat, corn, and grain sorghum at six field sites across three states. We will experimentally determine the temperature and humidity required to decrease weed seed viability in chaff lining using controlled environment experiments. We will synthesize the field and controlled environment data by modeling the relative efficacy of chaff lining and seed destruction over time. These results will be used to deliver outreach to growers and stakeholders to increase adoption of integrated weed management methods and reduce reliance on herbicides. Expected outcomes include reducing the density of weed populations and reducing long-term risks of herbicide resistance.
Animal Health Component
0%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
40%
Applied
30%
Developmental
30%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
2132300114080%
2162300114020%
Goals / Objectives
Our main goal is to determine the efficacy of chaff lining as a non-chemical integrated weed management approach in three dryland cropping systems, with the long-term aim of diversifying weed management tactics and reducing risks from herbicide resistant weeds. We will focus on field and greenhouse research repeated in multiple states representing a broad region of the Central Great Plains.Specifically, our objectives are to:1) Determine the efficacy of chaff lining on reducing weed emergence and seed viability in field conditions for winter wheat, corn, and grain sorghum cropping systems;2) Determine the temperature and humidity required to decrease weed seed viability in a chaff lining setting in controlled conditions;3) Model the impact of chaff lining on winter and summer annual weed densities in dryland cropping systems over time.
Project Methods
We propose to conduct this research using field-scale experiments in dryland crop systems including winter wheat, corn, and grain sorghum at six field sites across three states. We will experimentally determine the temperature and humidity required to decrease weed seed viability in chaff lining using controlled environment experiments. We will synthesize the field and controlled environment data by modeling the relative efficacy of chaff lining and seed destruction over time. These results will be used to deliver outreach to growers and stakeholders to increase adoption of integrated weed management methods and reduce reliance on herbicides. Expected outcomes include reducing the density of weed populations and reducing long-term risks of herbicide resistance.

Progress 09/01/21 to 08/31/22

Outputs
Target Audience:The main findings from this project are beingtransferred through an outreach approach. Growers and influential groups (e.g. crop consultants, extension agents, and commodities representatives) will receive this information at meetings, field days, and workshops. We are currently writing a CSU Extension Fact Sheet to report the results and interpretations for Central Great Plains dryland growers. The results of this project are filling the knowledge gap related to HWSC systems efficacy in dryland agro-ecosystems in the U.S. Outreach to growers and stakeholders is anticipated to increase adoption of integrated weed management methods and reduce reliance on herbicides. Changes/Problems:No major changes in the anticipated approach occurred. We made some minor modifications to the proposed experimental plan for the accelerated seed aging studies. What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?A research scientist (Dr. Eric Westra) has had the opportunity to develop his leadership skills to coordinate this multi-state project. A MS graduate student, Andre Araujo, conductedthe seed aging and modeling studies. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?We gave a presentation on results from Colorado to the Western IPM Center IPM Hour webinar series in November 2021. We intend to publish the results in a peer-reviewed journal and to prepare translational summaries for university extension. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?We will finalize all data analysis and prepare publications for submission to peer reviewed journals.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? We established crop plots in fall 2019 for wheat and in spring 2020 for corn and sorghum at all six sites across the three states. We collected wheat chaff and winter annual grass seeds in summer 2020. We established the wheat chaff lining trials at all 6 sites in August 2020. We collected corn and sorghum chaff and summer weed seeds for establishment of corn and sorghum chaff lining trials in autumn 2020. We completed the proposed field work in spring, summer, and autumn of 2021. The wheat chaff applications stayed intact and in place very well. The corn and sorghum chaff had issues due to blowing away in high winds. We used a mechanical device to physically hold the corn and sorghum chaff in place for the experiment. We collected weed emergence data throughout the spring and summer of 2022. Our initial data analyses indicate that weed emergence was substantially repressed by wheat chaff. We completed the accelerated seed aging studies during the reporting period. We are currently running thepredictive modeling analysis. We gave a presentation to the Western IPM Center IPM Hour webinar series in November 2021 in lieu of attending an in-person PD USDA-NIFA meeting.

Publications


    Progress 09/01/20 to 08/31/21

    Outputs
    Target Audience:The main findings from this project are expected to be transferred through a strong outreach approach. Growers and influential groups (e.g. crop consultants, extension agents, and commodities representatives) will receive this information at meetings, field days, and workshops. Moreover, it is anticipated that this project will fill the knowledge gap related to HWSC systems efficacy in dryland agro-ecosystems in the U.S. These results will be used to deliver outreach to growers and stakeholders to increase adoption of integrated weed management methods and reduce reliance on herbicides. Changes/Problems:We have encountered no major problems in our approach to date. What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?A research scientist (Dr. Eric Westra) has had the opportunity to develop his leadership skills to coordinate this multi-state project. A MS graduate student, Andre Araujo, is conducting the seed aging and modeling studies. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?We gave a presentation on results from Colorado to the Western IPM Center IPM Hour webinar series in November 2021. We intend to publish the results in a peer-reviewed journal and to prepare translational summaries for university extension. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?We will finalize data analysis for objective 1, and complete the experimental work and data analysis for objectives 2 and 3.

    Impacts
    What was accomplished under these goals? We established crop plots in fall 2019 for wheat and in spring 2020 for corn and sorghum at all six sites across the three states. We collected wheat chaff and winter annual grass seeds in summer 2020. We established the wheat chaff lining trials at all 6 sites in August 2020. We collectedcorn and sorghum chaff and summer weed seeds for establishment of corn and sorghum chaff lining trials in autumn 2020. We completed the proposed field work in spring, summer, and autumn of 2021. The wheat chaff applications stayed intact and in place very well. The corn and sorghum chaff had issues due to blowing away in high winds. We used a mechanical device to physically hold the corn and sorghum chaff in place for the experiment.We collected weed emergence data throughout the spring and summer. Our initial data analyses indicate that weed emergence was substantially repressed by wheat chaff. We are currently running the accelerated seed aging studies. The data from these studies will be combined with the field results to conduct a predictive modeling analysis. We gave a presentation to the Western IPM Center IPM Hour webinar series in lieu of attending an in-person PD USDA-NIFA meeting.

    Publications


      Progress 09/01/19 to 08/31/20

      Outputs
      Target Audience:The main findings from this project are expected to be transferred through a strong outreach approach. Growers and influential groups (e.g. crop consultants, extension agents, and commodities representatives) will receive this information at meetings, field days, and workshops. Moreover, it is anticipated that this project will fill the knowledge gap related to HWSC systems efficacy in dryland agro-ecosystems in the U.S. These results will be used to deliver outreach to growers and stakeholders to increase adoption of integrated weed management methods and reduce reliance on herbicides. Changes/Problems:We have encountered no major problems in our approach to date. What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided? Nothing Reported How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest? Nothing Reported What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals? Nothing Reported

      Impacts
      What was accomplished under these goals? We established crop plots in fall 2019 for wheat and in spring 2020 for corn and sorghum at all six sites across the three states. We collected wheat chaff and winter annual grass seeds in summer 2020. We established the wheat chaff lining trials at all 6 sites in August 2020. We are collecting corn and sorghum chaff and summer weed seeds for establishment of corn and sorghum chaff lining trials in autumn 2020.

      Publications