Source: PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY submitted to
SCRI CAP PROPOSAL: BIOLOGY, MANAGEMENT, AND REDUCING THE IMPACT OF THE SPOTTED LANTERNFLY IN SPECIALTY CROPS IN THE EASTERN USA
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
NEW
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
1020284
Grant No.
2019-51181-30014
Project No.
PENW-2019-03429
Proposal No.
2019-03429
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
SCRI
Project Start Date
Sep 1, 2019
Project End Date
Aug 31, 2023
Grant Year
2019
Project Director
Urban, J. M.
Recipient Organization
PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY
408 Old Main
UNIVERSITY PARK,PA 16802-1505
Performing Department
Entomology
Non Technical Summary
The Spotted Lanternfly (SLF), Lycorma delicatula, has emerged as an invasive pest of critical importance to specialty crops including tree fruit and grapes with the potential to affect many others. While we now know that SLF incurs immediate, acute damage to grapes, the potential for SLF to exert acute and/or chronic damage upon other specialty crops is not yet clear, but potential long-term impact of SLF in the USA could be staggering. In states where SLF has been established or has been detected, SLF threatens $802 million in tree fruit, $113 million in grape, $110 million in small fruit, and $2.6 billion in ornamentals; nationwide these numbers grow to over $18 billion. SLF lays inconspicuous egg masses on smooth surfaces including tree bark, automobiles, rail cars, and shipping pallets, portending abrupt, distant spread.Through our robust regional collaboration as a team of researchers and Extension personnel, we will rapidly develop tactics to mitigate injury to vulnerable specialty crops in the short-term. Based on an extensive array of lab and field based experiments, we will also expand our knowledge of SLF biology, ecology, behavior and biological control tactics to enable sustainable management, not only directly alleviating the threat to specialty crop producers, but also indirectly benefitting the many other SLF-affected stakeholder groups that are enduring pervasive and increasing problems. We will deliver management strategies and new knowledge to specialty crop stakeholders and the general public via synergized and innovative Extension programming produced by partnering universities, USDA, and NEIPMC. We will provide SLF education and outreach opportunities using traditional and web-based platforms. We will develop and implement evaluation plans to direct research plans and assess efficacy, including economic evaluation, of project outputs and management recommendations. We will train the next generation of scientists and Extension educators to be better prepared for invasive pests using cross-training and lab rotations to promote cross-institutional collaborations and enhance coordination of Extension and research activities. We will hold Stakeholder Advisory Panel meetings to evaluate accomplishments, direct and prioritize future research plans, and guide extension objectives.Through these efforts we seek to ultimately develop and communicate efficacious tactics for managing the invasive Spotted Lanternfly on vulnerable specialty crops to reduce the risk of widespread, catastrophic damage and to develop strategies for long-term SLF management.
Animal Health Component
0%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
50%
Applied
50%
Developmental
0%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
7213110113050%
2161139113030%
2111199113010%
2153110107010%
Goals / Objectives
This project seeks to achieve 3 major goals: 1) Quantify SLF impact on at-risk specialty crops and immediately develop management tactics to reduce the damage in areas where SLF is established; 2) Perform essential fundamental research on SLF basic biology, ecology, behavior and biological control tactics contributing to long-term sustainable solutions; and 3) Deliver immediate SLF management solutions to specialty crop stakeholders and the general public via the Extension networks of the partnering land grant universities, USDA agencies, and NE IPM.For each of these major goals, the project includes the following objectives:Goal 1:1.1. Assess damage from SLF feeding damage to fruit trees, vines, common border trees, and woody ornamentals in the field and laboratory.1.2. Conduct lab-based insecticide bioassays against SLF adults and nymphs.1.3. Conduct experimental pesticide trials in greenhouses, vineyards, and orchards against SLF adults, nymphs, and eggs.1.4. Implement, test, and refine existing tools for biosurveillance and monitoring.1.5. Examine the potential for SLF insecticide management to affect pollinators and biological control agents of other pests.Goal 2:2.1. Assess host plant suitability and SLF movement among various hosts under field conditions.2.2. Develop sustained SLF colonies in the laboratory and under semi-field conditions.2.3. Examine SLF feeding behavior.2.4. Determine baseline dispersal capacity of SLF adults and nymphs in laboratory and field.2.5. Identify dispersal pathways and predict expected range of SLF using multiple modeling approaches.2.6. Examine SLF capacity for transmission of microorganisms via feeding.2.7. Characterize SLF reproduction and endosymbiont transmission and establish potential for control via interruption.2.8. Examine potential SLF management with biological control.Goal 3:3.1 Deliver management strategies and new knowledge to specialty crop stakeholders and the general public via synergized and innovative Extension programming produced by partnering universities, USDA, and NEIPMC.3.2 Provide SLF education and outreach opportunities using traditional (e.g. regional meetings, on-farm demonstrations) and web-based (e.g. webinars) platforms.3.3. Develop and implement evaluation plans to direct research plans and assess efficacy, including economic evaluation, of project outputs and management recommendations.3.4. Train the next generation of scientists and Extension educators to be better prepared for invasive insects using cross-training and lab rotations to promote cross-institutional collaborations and enhance coordination of Extension and research activities.3.5. Hold Stakeholder Advisory Panel meetings to evaluate accomplishments, direct and prioritize future research plans, and guide execution of objectives
Project Methods
This project will involve an extensive series of laboratory and field-based experiments, each employing sufficient sample sizes / number of replicates to allow for rigorous statistical analyses, ensuring robustness and replicability of achieved experimental findings. Results of all insecticidal bioassays performed in lab and field trials will be evaluated with respect to relative efficacy as well as to other relevant factors (e.g., economic cost, impacts on non-targets, etc.), in order to arrive at specific recommendations for implementation by growers (e.g., Best Management Practices) and other stakeholders. Similarly, research findings concerning biosurveillance and monitoring tools, predictive models, economic impacts, biological control-based management options, etc., will also be evaluated in order to arrive at practical recommendations for impacted stakeholders. These findings will be disseminated via Extension fact sheets, management guidelines, public programs, Train-the-Trainer events with Master Gardeners and Extension educators, and through multiple on-line sites (Penn State Extension, NE IPM, stopSLF.org, etc.). Results of research on establishing and maintaining an SLF colony, studies of SLF feeding behavior, dispersal behavior, endosymbiont transmission, pathogen transmission, and other aspects of basic SLF biology will be disseminated via training workshops and experiential learning opportunities, scientific publications and presentations, as well as Extension and outreach events and workshops.Baseline data from 88 grape growers in PA and ~ 500 specialty crop growers in the Northeast has already been gathered to establish economic impacts and priorities for specialty crop growers. For those who have indicated SLF damage, we will follow-up to gather additional information including impacts on yield, insecticide applications, and changes in production (e.g. additional labor required). An evaluation specialist (NEIPMC) and economist will develop consistent surveys to be used throughout the region (both for baseline data and post-SLF response). These surveys will include adoption of new management practices, insecticide applications, yield, and overall knowledge of SLF. During webinars, trainings and regional grower meetings, audiences will be asked to complete this survey. The evaluation specialist will work to evaluate adoption of new IPM practices developed by the SLF team, while the economist will document the economic injury caused by SLF.Our Stakeholder Advisory Panel will meet in-person annually to review project accomplishments, provide feedback, and guide the execution of objectives. Prior to each annual meeting, the Panel will receive (1) research updates; (2) an update on educational resources, and (3) developments regarding the spread and establishment of SLF, regulatory changes, etc. We will hold an eMeeting (via Zoom) during the growing season each year to brief our panel on research plans and observations of SLF. The panel includes representatives from processing, marketing and wholesale specialty crop industries; grower organizations; specialty crop growers; the organic community; regulatory agencies and research and Extension personnel. The Panel will provide an assessment of the project and develop recommendations for future research and outreach. Based on input from the Panel, we will modify objectives to meet the needs of stakeholders and mitigate the risk posed the U.S. agriculture.

Progress 09/01/19 to 08/31/20

Outputs
Target Audience:The following target audiences were focused upon in this reporting period: grape growers and wine grape industry orchardists and other fruit growers vegetable growers Master gardeners arboricultural and forestry industries fruit and forest entomologists graduate and undergraduate students learning about invasive species homeowners IPM practitioners green industry professionals, specifically ornamental growers and nurseries lawn and landscape managers members of the general public, including Citizen Scientists participating in various spotted lanternfly projects local goverernments in the following states: PA, WV, NJ, DE, NY, MD, VA, MA, OH, with particular emphasis on Departments of Agriculture (especially the PA Department of Agriculture, NY DEC, andNY Ag and Markets) industries and shippers in spotted lanternfly quarantine states: PA, WV, VA, NJ, DE, NY, MD collaborators within the USDA, specifically those working on biological control who are not participants in the current SCRI project Extension professionals in participating universities and those also in the spotted lanternfly quarantine states and in other concerned states at risk for invasion (i.e., MD, MA, OH, OR, WA, CA, NC) university researchers at Land Grant and other universities and colleges throughout the US who are concerned about spotted lanternfly policy makers in various government agencies within the USDA such as APHIS, NRCS, ARS, EPA, NIFA the USDA-OPMP and the pesticide industry to develop insecticide label amendments for spotted lanternfly agencies that work in collaboration with Northeast IPM (a member of the current grant collaboration) including NE SARE, state IPM coordinators that participate in the multistate project NEERA-1604, HUD, the NE IPM's Advisory Council, and three other regional IPM centers covering the entire US Changes/Problems:Various lab and field studies that were planned for 2020 were partially delayed due to Covid travel restrictions and Covid associated lab and univeristy closures. Overall, however, significant progress was achieved despite these limitations. With respect toGoal 2.8: Foreign exploration could not be conducted during 2020 due to Covid travel restrictions (either by US coPI & staff or by Asian cooperators), but in-house research was conducted with natural enemies already in US culture. With the assistance of APHIS cooperators, we initiated non-target testing of the egg parasitoid Anastatus orientalis. We also pursued efforts to obtain live material for lab culture of the nymphal parasitoid Dryinus sinicus, and we worked with Asian cooperators and other taxonomic specialists in the U.S. and Italy to confirm the correct identity of D. sinicus. With respect to Goal 2.6: One international postdoctoral scientist to whom a job offer to work on this project was made last spring, can not join our team until July 2021 because of VISA's issue due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic has also slowed down the exchange of infected material requested to other universities to conduct transmission experiments in 2.6.? What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?All collaborators in the current SLF SCRI project participated in a SLF research symposium that was held on May 15, 2020. This symposium was virtual and created due to the cancellation of other entomology and specialty crop-based conferences (due to COVID-19). The symposium allowed for presentation experience among young professionals and exposure to our project team to connect and collaborate. In addition to the SLF symposium, and 4 virtual meetings focused on reporting progress on, and plans for, work on all project objectives, the following opportunities for training and professional development were identified by collaborators at each institution. Rutgers University: Two students were trained in SLF identification and monitoring techniques through the Rutgers Fruit IPM program A M.S. student, Kasia Madalinska began research on SLF stage specific feeding, monitoring, and management. Ms. Madalinska is being trained on sampling and management tactics as well as statistical analysis. She has also been active in extension activities for SLF in wine grapes. Postdoctoral associate, Donnie Peterson was hired and began studies on eDNA for SLF. Dr. Peterson has been trained on qPCR and other lab techniques associated with eDNA lanternfly surveys, as well as statistical routines needed to analyze resultant data. Cornell University: We began a virtual 'Morning Brew' 6AM meeting this spring to provide tree fruit growers and extension specialists with the opportunity for weekly state-wide discussions on relevant pest management issues that included SLF sightings in NYS. We began planning for outreach and development training for the agricultural community in the lower Hudson Valley via virtual Zoom for 2021. University of Rhode Island: The Spotted Lanternfly working group and the SCRI collaborative research program has regular meetings and conferences to provide professional development related to the project. URI personnel presented and participated in the virtual SLF research symposium that was held on May 15, 2020. Virginia Tech: The project has supported presentations at our annual orchard fruit schools, the main educational venue for tree fruit growers. It also supported presentations for the Virginia Vineyard Association. Two graduate students are involved with this project, critical to their professional development. We support are training/certification program that is integral to Virginia's quarantine program. Students in our graduate pest management course carry out a class project. This involves creating a draft extension fact sheet and a recorded presentation. Two of the seven students in fall 2020 selected spotted lanternfly as their subject. University of Delaware: A graduate student was trained in the use of a mounted camera and EthoVision software for behavioral assays of the behavior of parasitoids in response to chemical traces left behind by potential host species. Temple University: A postdoctoral scientist is being trained on modeling spread of SLF, working in collaboration with Matthew Helmus and all associated members of the Temple modeling and forecasting team. USDA: One ARS postdoc (primarily employed for BMSB) spent ca. 10% of his time assisting a Univ. Delaware graduate student with biocontrol research on lanternfly. A visiting graduate student from Italy also spent some of his time conducting behavioral research with the egg parasitoid, also in conjunction with the ARS postdoc. Several talks were presented by these students and the postdoc based on their work to various interest groups. Two post-docs will be joining the project in 2021 in Leskey Lab, one funded by SCRI and one funded through cooperative agreement with Virginia Tech. Penn State: The project has facilitated the training of two postdoctoral researchers in incisive experimental design with Tom Baker, and the logical progression of experiments stemming from successive experimental findings, and the processing and analysis of video-recorded motion-behavior providing complex behavioral interpretations that require well-developed writing and oral communication skills. Fang Zhu served as Faculty Member of EnvironMentors for one high school student and one undergraduate student, National Council for Science and Environment, Penn State Chapter during September 2019 to May 2020. Students worked on Environmental impacts of pesticides used for Spotted Lanternfly control in Dr. Zhu's lab and gave an oral presentation in Virtual S.T.E.M. SHOWCASE in May 2020. In Greg Krawczyk's lab, three undergraduate students participated in research activities during summer related to SLF activities: Phineas Shaum (PSU undergraduate), Cole Taylor (Wilson College undergraduate), Bradley Filler (University of Pittsburgh undergraduate) A M.S. student, in entomology started his thesis research on non-target effects of insecticides used to control SLF in large-scale forest and ornamental area in the summer of 2019 and is co-advised by Drs. Biddinger & Hoover. APh.D. student is working with Dr. Biddinger whose thesis is understanding the susceptibility of honey bees and Osmia bees to field realistic doses found in plant nectar and pollen after insecticide applications and with targeted bioassays for imidacloprid and dinotefuron. One M.S. student started her degree with Co-PIs Centinari and Rosa and is working on SLF transmission of plant pathogens. One M.S. student started her Entomology degree with PI Urban working on SLF behavior and female reproductive development. EPG refresher training was taken (remotely) during Nov 2020 for early career professional Co-PI Sattar. Training provided by Dr. Elaine Backus. This project has provided training opportunities for a Plant Science Ph.D. student (Andrew Harner). Andrew was trained on the use of eco-physiological equipment and related data analysis and laboratory protocols for identification and quantification of metabolic compounds. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?In addition to the dissemination of project findings enumerated in the Products and Other Products sections of this report, the following ways in which results have been disseminated to communities of interest were identified by collaborators at each institution. Rutgers University: The NJAES factsheet was updated with relevant information (https://njaes.rutgers.edu/spotted-lanternfly/) and SLF-specific blog posts on Rutgers Plant Pest Advisory were electronically posted in June and August and delivered to all subscribers. Due to COVID restrictions, farm visits to grower cooperators or those within the Rutgers IPM program were performed individually or with proper social distancing protocols in place. Monitoring for SLF took place at three commercial vineyards and the surrounding woodlots resulting in 18 on-farm visits. Two management projects were conducted on-farm with a grower cooperator in northern NJ resulting in 36 on-farm visits. The Rutgers Fruit IPM program had 490 individual grower reports, 112 one-on-one consultations, and 9 electronic newsletter articles through which they conveyed monitoring results. Through the Rutgers Fruit IPM scouting program, 7 grower twilight meetings, and blog posts we were able to provide up-to-date information on SLF activity, pressure, and management strategies to our target fruit producer audience. University of Rhode Island: URI has featured several of the non-target species on their social media pages as "insect of the week" posts and story updates. URI biocontrol has 258 followers on Instagram and 90 on Facebook. All outreach presentations given by professional staff on Spotted Lanternfly include information about the biocontrol research that is being conducted as one component of this project, and the University of Rhode Island's contributions to it. VA Tech: Our data contribute to refereed journal articles. We have created 4 extension fact sheets, three of which have been translated into Spanish. A page in the Virginia Fruit web site is updated regularly. We contribute to the Virginia Cooperative Extension SLF web site. Information on SLF is disseminated through a blog, and via Pfeiffer's Google Groups for tree fruits, grapes, berry crops, and hops. Extension talks are provided for orchardists and vineyard industry. Results are disseminated in undergraduate and graduate pest management courses. University of Delaware: Open communication (via email and conference calls) with the USDA-APHIS Buzzards Bay and the USDA-ARS Newark facilities was maintained during this research to help with collaboration and dissemination of information and progress. A presentation was given on the EthoVision research at the USDA Interagency Forum on Invasive Species, and on rearing the non-target host-suitability focal species at the Spotted lanternfly virtual symposium. In addition, Tyler Hagerty was interviewed for a video for the Delaware State Parks on September 10th, 2020 and for the University of Delaware student newspaper (The Review) for an article entitles "Spotted lanternflies: a beautiful yet voracious pest" (September 18, 2020). Temple University: Temple University has been in regular communication with the Philadelphia Department of Parks and Recreation to help inform management of SLF in urban areas within the city. Matt Helmus and Julie Urban (Penn State) were interviewed in an article published in the New York Times on SLF. USDA: Discussions with Dr. Hannah Broadley and Dr. Juli Gould (USDA APHIS Otis Laboratory) who are working on biocontrol using the dryinid parasitoid lead to the conclusion that they can collect egg masses of SLF from the field so mass rearing is not essential, but essential assistance is needed to rear several non-target species for host specificity studies. Conference presentations on SLF biocontrol research and related subjects (identifying and rearing non target species needed for host range testing) were presented at the Nov. 2019 national ESA meeting in St. Louis and in Nov. 2020 (virtual meeting), the USDA Invasive Species Forum in Jan. 2020 in Annapolis, as updates within several talks presented in Feb. 2020 by the co-PI in Australia to CSIRO and New Zealand to Plant & Food Research and other regulatory audiences. Presented at USDA Invasive Species Forum in 2020. Penn State: Research updates and recorded webinars and meetings are regularly posted on our project website, StopSLF.org. This website is shared both with members of the interested public, growers, and our SAP. Management guides and basic factsheets have been updated with information generated from the SCRI project across all of our institutions. Many of these factsheets can be found here: https://extension.psu.edu/spotted-lanternfly-management-resources. Presented at the USDA Invasive Species Forum in 2020. Organized (co-organized by Hoover and Urban) and presented findings at a SLF Symposium at the Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting in Nov. 2019. Second annual meeting of the SLF Working Group Workshop and Early Career Professionals Virtual SLF Research Symposium organized by PI Urban and Co-PD Leach. Weekly lab meetings in Co-PI Rosa's research group. Undergraduate courses (50+students/year) with Co-PI Rosa as instructor. The results have been disseminated in the form of presentations to wine grape growers groups and academic community at extension meetings and webinars. Newspapers throughout Pennsylvania that published summaries of many aspects of SLF research and associated findings and the College of Agriculture's communications department has issued numerous press releases and stories about Penn State's work on SLF (some of these are posted on stopSLF.org or at https://extension.psu.edu/spotted-lanternfly). Extension activities (primarily presentations and grower talks) delivered either in person or virtually by numerous Penn State collaborators (Leach, Centinari, Baker, Hoover, Krawczyk, Biddinger, Urban). What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?In addition to continuing to follow up on findings achieved to date, project collaborators identified the following plans for the next reporting period: Rutgers: 1.3 Repeat and revise management trials as needed 1.4 Implement, test, and refine existing tools for biosurveillance and monitoring; complete all eDNA methodological field trials, analyze resultant data, and disseminate results via publication, conference presentations, and web-based instructional materials; Continue monitoring using the circle trap; write up manuscript on the distribution of egg masses for peer-review 2.1 Repeat study on the influence of host plant on cohort development and survivorship 3.1Continue Rutgers Fruit IPM program scouting efforts 3.2 Continue grower meetings on SLF biology and management 3.4 Continue training of students and researchers Cornell: 1.1Continue research,using injection technologies; surveying for SLF in the Hudson Valley; and outreach. Develop training for the agricultural community in the lower Hudson Valley 2.5Complete preliminary snapshot of spotted lanternfly degree day requirements; complete degree day modeling and development of a spotted lanternfly predictive model 2.8.2 Complete a peer-reviewed publication reporting results from challenging all SLF instars with 5 biopesticides based on entomopathogenic fungi; complete studies of the genetic diversity of native entomopathogenic fungi isolated from SLF; compare the pathogenicity and virulence of native isolates of entomopathogenic fungi with the top biopesticides; assess and publish impacts of Batkoa major on SLF 3.1 & 3.2 Continue to host elists, www.stopslf.org, and respond to social media; publish newsletterInsightsfocused on project accomplishments; seek SLF-focused topics for our webinar series each year 3.1 Contact state regulatory officials in affected states in the coming months to capture new infestations and quarantine zones for the regional Spotted Lanternfly distribution map. 3.3Seek sources of data on IPM practices within the affected area, looking for indications of pesticide use trends versus trends of IPM adoption in general Delaware: Provide USDA-APHIS with eggs for host suitability studies for the remaining non-target colonies; as Covid restrictions lift, pursue molecular work onAnastatusspecies, including training in the molecular lab of USDA APHIS cooperator Yunke Wu; conduct field work in China with USDA cooperators in foreign exploration to investigate and collect possible biocontrol agents Rhode Island: 2.8 Continue rearing non-target species to provide egg masses and nymphs as required by USDA labs for host range testing of potential SLF parasitoids. Temple: Continue simulations-based work by incorporating findings from empirical studies of SLF biology Virginia Tech: 1.1 Continue work on tree ring analysis, and initiate work on impacts on grapevines 1.2 Evaluate factors that influence efficacy of ovicides, including egg age, diapause state and penetrants; examine the role ofBeauveria bassianain SLF management 1.3 Evaluate pesticide efficacy in infestation zone 1.4 Continue work on trap design, and role in plant-based semiochemicals 2.1 Continue work on host plant use as SLF spreads through the state 2.3 Continue work on assessing the effects of different repellents on SLF nymphs and adults in olfactometer experiments, feeding choice assays, and semi-field trials 2.5 Continue work on avenues of spread 2.8 Examine Beauveriaas a control agent; assess sequestration of alkaloids from TOH, which could affect SLF palatability by natural predators 3.1 Disseminate information to stakeholders, including through Extension programming 3.4 Continue training in invasive pest biology and management USDA: Work with USDA biocontrol researchers to start developing rearing capabilities for non-target native host species to provide them with for host specificity testing of the dryinid parasitoid of SLF; expand field surveys for resident natural enemies that may attack SLF, and continue host range evaluations and related behavioral research to support eventual petitions for field release of Asian parasitoids; as Covid restrictions lift, conduct additional research in China and Korea to examine the impact on SLF due to natural enemies and determine the specificity of the key parasitoid natural enemies on potential Asian non target species; continue with studies associated with 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 2.2, 2.3 and 2.4 Penn State: 1.1. Complete data analyses for two grape experiments and two experiments investigating effects of SLF feeding on physiology of ornamental trees; conduct carbon partitioning experiment originally planned for 2020; identify research priorities based on results from a stakeholder focus group 1.3. Conduct insecticide trials using variable application methods and rates using systemic insecticides through irrigation and the use of physical barriers in combination with insecticides; publish the results of the non-target impacts on ground and aerial arthropod communities in the large plot trials with various treatments ofBeauveriaand dinotefuran; determine the carryover of fall trunk, bark, and drench sprays of neonicotinoids used to control SLF on bees coming to the flowers of treated trees the following season; determine the most effective organic Beauveria and essential oil treatments for SLF for home owners and organic growers; compare insecticide treatments of bifenthrin and dinotefuron in large plot treatments and evaluate non-target impacts on pollinators and other arthropods 2.3. Using EPG, record all life stages on Tree of Heaven; record all life stages on grapes; perform correlation of EPG feeding patterns with histological studies to verify the physical location of the stylet and/or salivary sheath in the host plant tissue 2.4. Conduct movement frequency and patterns of SLF surrounding vineyards according to the landscape classification; evaluate high-risk pathways that SLF enter vineyards and other agricultural commodities 2.6. Test if adults SLF transmitted grapevine yellows phytoplasmas to healthy grapevines; complete transmission experiments for Pierce's disease and for grapevine viruses; test interactions of plant defense responses when plants are subjected to SLF feeding and to SLF feeding plus other pathogens 2.7. Continue dissections of SLF females to identify key transitions in reproductive development and endosymbiont transmission. In order to improve timing of various management options against SLF adults, develop key stages in female reproductive development into a degree day model 2.8 Determine the carryover of fall trunk, bark, and drench sprays of neonicotinoids used to control SLF on bees coming to the flowers of treated trees the following season; determine the importance and pollinator fauna that rely on red maple and tree of heaven to understand implications of treating these trees for SLF; develop and bloom phenology model to compare against SLF development to better target insecticide treatment for SLF nymphs while avoiding flowering plant bloom to minimize non-target impacts 3.1 & 3.2. Update project website: StopSLF.org 3.3. Survey affected stakeholders to evaluate and understand the impact of SLF and the priorities for research and extension. 3.4. When Covid restrictions are lifted, conduct a field-day demonstration for all students, post-docs, and other professionals involved in our SCRI project to see SLF invasion in vineyards and ornamental nurseries, meet with growers, and see projects in operation 3.5. Conduct a SAP symposium to update them on our 2020 research progress and identify their priorities moving forward; provide SAP updates (research planning and research/field season updates, respectively) via Zoom and written notes available to all SAP members afterwards

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? 1.1 Weekly surveys of vineyards and adjacent areas were conducted in PA to detect presence and level of infestation of SLF in commercial vineyards throughout the season. Surveys were conducted for in commercial fruit orchard and adjacent areas in PA to detect the presence of SLF nymphs and adults. Bi-weekly surveys for SLF was conducted in Wayne county NY in apple, grape, sumac, and maple at six orchards from 8/12-9/25, 2020. A. altissima were located and scouted for SLF in 18 sites in NY in four counties where SLF had been previously detected. In VA, tree cores and dendrochronology were used to assess SLF feeding damage to A. altissima, black walnut, red maple, and tulip poplar. In PA. host suitability and damage by SLF on select specialty crops was investigated, including peach, hops, raspberry, cucumber, fig, avocado, and kiwi. Impact of SLF feeding on physiology of ornamental trees was assessed in two experiments. Tree response measurements were taken on photosynthesis rate, water efficiency, and gas exchange. Impact of SLF feeding on production, physiology and health was assessed in two experiments in which SLF was enclosed on two varieties of grape. Multiple trap designs, with and without lures, were used to monitor for SLF in the field in PA. 1.2 Insecticide bioassays were conducted on SLF eggs and early instar nymphs in lab testing efficacy of neonicotinoids, bio-rational products (oils and soaps), and nets with incorporated insecticides. 1.3 Lab tested compounds for eggs and nymphs were tested in field conditions. In potted peach, grape, A. altissima, and sunflower, 60 foliar-applied insecticides were tested. Results informed 2 (ee) label amendments for 15 insecticides that added SLF to list of pests controlled. 12 bioinsecticides using strains of Beauveria bassiana and Isaria fumerosa were tested against SLF nymphs and adults on potted plants. In a NJ vineyard, BoteGHA applied via airblast or CO2 sprayer was tested against early instar nymphs. A residual efficacy insecticide trial was carried out in a PA vineyard testing 8 products in 4 chemical classes, and at variable rates of products. Border spray applications of insecticide using a cannon-style sprayer were compared to every row application for controlling SLF in vineyards. This can be used in numerous crops to control the edges where SLF populations are highest. Insecticide-impregnated netting was installed on a 13-foot flight intercept barrier along a vineyard to test efficacy in preventing SLF from flying in from the surrounding landscape. Over the row exclusion netting was deployed in vineyards to exclude SLF from infesting grapevines across 5 different vineyards and compared to uncovered grapevines. Effects on number of needed pesticide applications between treatments was tracked. Tree injection delivery of dinotefuran was tested in urban areas. Long term efficacy of 5 months was observed for treated willow. Vetagaard Inseticide Netting was tested in a NJ vineyard for post-harvest application. Dispersal into the vineyard was measured by marking and tracking adult SLF. 1.4 Field trials testing variations in eDNA survey methodology were conducted. Landscape factors influencing egg mass abundance in wooded habitats around vineyards in NJ was conducted. A trapping studied was carried out in PA using funnel-style circle traps on 5 different hosts within a SLF infested area across each life stage. In VA, several trap designs were compared including sticky bands, and Circle traps. A student has begun research on plant semiochemicals and SLF. In PA, prototype telephone poles used behavioral 'visual traps' were established and monitored for efficacy. 1.5 Evaluations of red maple trees treated in 2019 for SLF by trunk injection or soil drenches of imidacloprid or dinotefuron were tested for persistence of residues in flowers the following spring. Non-target effects two rates of B. bassiana were evaluated two field trials found no significant non-target effects on other arthropods such as bees. 2.1. Same-aged nymphal cohorts were placed on black walnut, red maple, Ailanthus, or grape to test influence of hosts on development and survival of nymphs. Weather conditions caused high mortality for first instars overall. Development was much lower on red maple than on other host plants. Drafting MS of suitability of wild and specialty crop hosts for SLF. Development and fitness of SLF with and without access to A. altissima was tested in 2 generations of SLF. Documented 2019 and 2020 SLF seasonal phenology in Winchester, VA. Calculated the cumulative average growing degree days for each life stage per year. 2.2 Tested a SLF rearing protocol in Virginia Tech's quarantine laboratory using three types of tree-of-heaven cuttings as a food source. Develop sustained SLF colonies in the laboratory and under semi-field conditions at Fort Detrick, MD. Writing manuscript detailing laboratory rearing of SLF. 2.3. Tested the repellent effect of lavender oil in a pilot semi-field trial by monitoring retention and movement of SLF adults on TOH and grape (Tholl & Ruether together with Leskey & Nixon). Retention of SLF was higher on TOH than grape but not significantly different in the presence or absence of the oil. AC-DC EPG equipment acquired and installed in quarantine laboratory at Penn State University Park. Feeding behavior recorded for SLF 2 and 4th instars on A. altissima. 2.4 Manuscript reporting results of a mark, release, re-sight study of SLF published. 2.5 Flight capacity (measuring distance and duration of flight) of free and tethered SLF adults tested in lab and field. Five spotted lanternfly life stage observational datasets were analyzed to estimate percentage emergence for reported days of year 5%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 95% life stage emergence. In VA we have found that SLF may be associated with TOH along rail lines. 2.6 Helped a former grad student perform an experiment assessing if SLF can vector a plant pathogen between tree-of-heaven in a lab setting APHIS permits were obtained to import plant pathogens (Xylella fastidiosa, Grape Yellows and Grapevine red blotch virus) for transmission experiments. Identified vineyards for transmission studies grapevine red blotch virus grape yellows phytoplasmas, and grapevine leafroll virus. Grafted potted healthy grapevines with virus infected buds to obtain infected plants suitable for transmission experiments in controlled conditions. 2.7 Collected SLF adult females weekly from multiple locations. Dissected over 200 females to identify developmental changes in insects and endosymbionts. 2.8 Non-target testing conducted for egg parasitoid Anastatus orientalis. We also pursued efforts to obtain live material for lab culture of the nymphal parasitoid Dryinus sinicus. Eight possible non-target Hemipteran species (planthoppers and close relatives) were collected and sustained in rearing cages for host specificity testing of spotted lanternfly biocontrol agents. Host suitability tests were conducted with Heteroptera and found parasitism in the squash bug Anasa tristis, 5 species of stink bug and the moth Anthereae polyphemus. Of 23 species included in the potential non-targets list, 21 species have been successfully in located and collected and are being reared for non-target testing. 3.1 - 3.3 Delivery of management solutions is documented in detail in the Products and Other Products sections of this report and summarized on the project's website stopSLF.org. 3.4 A student and young professional based symposium was held in May 2020 to report on current and past SLF research projects. Much of these projects are serving as baseline data and platforms to extend research supported by the SCRI. 3.5 An end-of-season SAP update call was held in October 2020 to update our SAP on the current status of the SLF invasion and affected crops and summarize 2020 research progress.

Publications

  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Urban JM. 2020. Perspective: Shedding light on spotted lanternfly impacts in the USA. Pest Management Science, 76(1): 10-17.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Accepted Year Published: 2020 Citation: Smyers E, Urban J, Dechaine A, Pfeiffer D, Crawford S, and Calvin D. (In press). Spatial-temporal model for predicting spring hatch of the spotted lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae). Environmental Entomology.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Keller J, Rost J, Hoover K, Urban J, Leach H, Porras M, Walsh B, Bosold M, and Calvin D. 2020. Dispersion patterns and sample size estimates for egg masses of spotted lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae). Environmental Entomology. nvaa107, https://doi.org/10.1093/ee/nvaa107
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Leach H, Biddinger DJ, Krawczyk G, Smyers E, and Urban JM. 2019. Evaluation of insecticides for control of the spotted lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula, (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae), a new pest of fruit in the Northeastern U.S. Crop Protection, 124:1-6.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Leach H and Leach A. 2020. Seasonal phenology and activity of spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) in eastern US vineyards. J Pest Sci 93:1215-1224.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Mason CJ, Walsh B, Keller J, Couture JJ, Calvin D, and Urban JM. 2020. Fidelity and timing of spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) attack patterns on ornamental trees in the suburban landscape. Environmental Entomology. https://doi.org/10.1093/ee/nvaa109
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Clifton EH, Hajek AE, Jenkins NE, Roush RT, Rost JP, and Biddinger. 2020. Applications of Beauveria bassiana (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae) to control populations of spotted lanternfly (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae), in semi-natural landscapes and on grapevines. Environ Entomol 49(4):854-864.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Harper JK, Stone W, Kelsey TW, and Kime LF. 2019. Potential economic impact of the spotted lanternfly on agriculture and forestry in Pennsylvania. Report for the Center for Rural Pennsylvania. Available: https://www.rural.palegislature.us/documents/reports/Spotted-Lanternfly-2019.pdf.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Accepted Year Published: 2020 Citation: Kreitman, D. M.A. Keena, A.L. Nielsen, and G. Hamilton. In Press. Effects of Temperature on Development and Survival of Nymphal Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae). Environmental Entomology.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Accepted Year Published: 2020 Citation: Keena M and AL Nielsen. In press. Comparison of the hatch of newly laid Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae) eggs from the United States after exposure to different temperatures and durations of low temperature. Environ Entomol
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Brooks. R. K., A. Toland, A. C. Dechaine, T. McAvoy and Scott Salom. 2020. The inability of spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) to vector a plant pathogen between its preferred host, Ailanthus altissima, in a laboratory setting. Insects. 11: 1-10. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11080515
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Nixon, L, H. Leach, C. Barnes, J. Urban, D. Kirkpatrick, D. Ludwick, B. Short, D. G. Pfeiffer and T. C. Leskey. 2020. Development of behaviorally based monitoring and biosurveillance tools for the invasive spotted lanternfly (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae Lycorma delicatula). Environ. Entomol. 49: 1117-1126.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Kingan SB, Urban J, Lambert CC, Baybayan P, Childers AK, Coates BS, et al., 2019. A high quality genome assembly from a single, field-collected Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) using the PacBio Sequel II system. Gigascience, 8(10).
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Malek R, Kaser J, Gould J, Broadley HJ, Gould J, Ciolli M, Anfora G, Hoelmer KA. Footprints and ootheca of Lycorma delicatula influence host-searching and -acceptance of the egg-parasitoid Anastatus orientalis. Envir. Entomol. 48:1270-1276, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1093/ee/nvz110
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Accepted Year Published: 2020 Citation: Broadley HJ, Gould J, Wang XY, Hoelmer KA, Hickin M, Sullivan L, Elkinton JS. Life history and rearing of Anastatus orientalis, an egg parasitoid of the spotted lanternfly. Env. Entomol.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Accepted Year Published: 2020 Citation: Xin B, Zhang YL, Wang XY, Cao LM, Hoelmer KA, Broadley HJ, Gould JR. Exploratory survey of spotted lanternfly (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae) and its natural enemies in China. Env. Entomol.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Kaser J, Hagerty T, Cooperband MF, Broadley HJ, Gould JR, Bartlett C, Hoelmer KA. Behavioral response of the spotted lanternfly egg parasitoid Anastatus orientalis to chemical traces left by target and non-target adults. Poster abstract. Proc. USDA Invasive Species Forum, Annapolis, MD, Jan. 2020.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Accepted Year Published: 2020 Citation: Nixon, L.J., D.C. Ludwick, and T.C. Leskey. 2020. Horizontal and vertical dispersal capacity and effects of fluorescent marking on Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae) nymphs and adults. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Wolfin, M. S., Myrick, A. J., and Baker, T. C. (2020) Flight duration capabilities of dispersing adult spotted lanternflies, Lycorma delicatula. J. Insect Behav. doi.org./10.1007/s 10905-020-09754-w.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Wolfin, M. S., Binyameen, M., Wang, Y., Urban, J. M., Roberts, D. C., and Baker, T. C. (2019) Flight dispersal capabilities of female spotted lanternflies (Lycorma delicatula) related to size and mating status. J. Insect Behav. 32: 188-200.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Baker, T. C., Smyers, E. C., Urban, J. M., Meng,, Z., Pagadala Damadaram, K. J., Myrick, A. J., Cooperband, M. F., and Domingue, M. J. (2019) Progression of seasonal activities of adults of the spotted lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula, during the 2017 season of mass flight dispersal behavior in eastern Pennsylvania. J. Asia-Pac. Entomol. 22:705-713.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Myrick, A. J. and Baker, T. C. (2019) Analysis of anemotactic flight tendencies of the spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) during the 2017 mass dispersal flights in Pennsylvania. J. Insect Behav. 1:1123.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Domingue, M. J., and Baker, T. C. (2019) Orientation of flight for physically disturbed spotted lanternflies, Lycorma delicatula, (Hemiptera, Fulgoridae). J. Asia-Pac. Entomol. 22: 117-120.
  • Type: Other Status: Under Review Year Published: 2020 Citation: Halbert, S. E., C. A. Boring, C. R. Bartlett. 2020. Lycorma delicatula (White) (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae), the Spotted Lanternfly. Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry. 2 pp.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Heller, S., Joshi, N. K., Chen, J., Rajotte, E. G., Mullin, C., and Biddinger, D.J. 2020. Pollinator exposure to systemic insecticides and fungicides applied in the previous fall and pre-bloom period in apple orchards. Environmental Pollution, doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2020.114589.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Urban, J.M. In press. Update on research and management of spotted lanternfly in the Northeast U.S. Proc. USDA Invasive Species Forum, Annapolis, MD, Jan. 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Laura J. Nixon, USDA-ARS; Co-Authors: Heather Leach, Caitlin Barnes, Julie Urban, Danielle M. Kirkpatrick, Dalton C. Ludwick, Brent Short, Douglas G. Pfeiffer, and Tracy C. Leskey. Developing behaviorally appropriate monitoring tools for Lycorma delicatula. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Donnie Peterson, Rutgers University; Co-Authors: Michael C. Allen, Anne L. Nielsen, Julie L. Lockwood. Detection rates of spotted lanternfly in vineyards, a comparison of eDNA and visual survey methodologies. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Katarzyna Madalinska, Rutgers University; Co-Authors: Anne L. Nielsen. SLF egg mass distribution in wooded habitats. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Joe Keller, Penn State; Co-Authors: Dennis Calvin. Dispersion patterns and sample size estimation for spotted lanternfly egg masses. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Eric Day, Virginia Tech; Co-Authors: Theresa Dellinger, Doug Pfieffer, Mark Sutphin. Extension and outreach for SLF in Virginia. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Other Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Agnello, A., B. Brown, J. Carroll, L. Cheng, K. Cox, P. D. Curtis, A. Dunn, M. Helms, T. Robinson. Spotted Lanternfly, General Pest Management Considerations (Apples, Pears, Cherries, Peaches & Nectarines, Apricots, Plums & Prunes). 2019. 2020 Pest Management Guidelines for Commercial Tree-Fruit Production. Cornell Coop. Extension, Ithaca, N.Y. 306 pp. https://cropandpestguides.cce.cornell.edu/
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: A Nielsen, M Allen, K. Madalinska, A Rucker. 2020 Before You See the Spots: Using eDNA as a Biosurveillance Tool for Spotted Lanternfly in NJ Vineyards. Cumberland-Shenandoah Fruit Workers Conference, Winchester, VA
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Andrew Harner, Penn State; Co-Authors: Michela Centinari, Lauren Briggs, Heather Leach, and Julie Urban. Grapevine responses to increasing spotted lanternfly population density in 2019. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Anne Johnson, Penn State; Co-Authors: Osariyekemwen Uyi, Joe Keller, David Long, Brian Walsh, and Kelli Hoover. Spotted lanternfly development and reproduction without access to tree of heaven. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Mariam Taleb, Penn State; Co-Authors: Julie Urban. Fungal communities and sooty mold on SLF-infested A. altissima. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Michael Wolfin, Penn State; Co-Authors: Tom Baker, Andy Myrick. Flight dispersal capabilities of adult spotted lanternflies. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Lauren Briggs, Penn State; Co-Authors: Heather Leach. Spatial patterns and preference of spotted lanternfly oviposition. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Erica Smyers, Penn State; Co-Authors: Andrew Dechaine, Doug Pfeiffer, Dennis Calvin, Julie Urban. Spatial-temporal model for L. delicatula spring egg hatch. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Devin Kreitman, Rutgers University; Co-Authors: George Hamilton, Anne Nielsen, Melody Keena. Nymphal spotted lanternfly responses to temperature. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Stephanie Lewkiewicz, Temple University; Co-Authors: Sebastiano De Bona, Matthew Helmus, Benjamin Seibold. Mathematical modeling of SLF population dynamics. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Robert Malek, University of Trento; Co-Authors: Joe M Kaser, Hannah J. Broadley, Juli Gould, Marco Ciolli, Gianfranco Anfora and Kim A. Hoelmer. Footprints and ootheca of Lycorma delicatula influence host-searching and-acceptance of the egg-parasitoid Anastatus orientalis. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Joe M. Kaser, USDA-ARS Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit; Co-Authors: Tyler Hagerty; Miriam F. Cooperband; Hannah J. Broadley; Juli R. Gould; Charles Bartlett, Kim A. Hoelmer. Behavioral response of the parasitoid Anastatus orientalis to chemical traces left by spotted lantern fly and non-target adults. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Other Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Day, E., M. Sutphin, T. Dellinger, D. Pfeiffer and M. Dodd. 2019. Citizen science detection of spotted lanternfly. 2020 Spotted Lanternfly Summit. Harrisburg PA. March 3-4, 2020.
  • Type: Other Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Urban, J.M. Update on spotted lanternfly research. 2020 Spotted Lanternfly Summit. Harrisburg PA. March 3-4, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Sebastiano De Bona, Temple University; Co-Authors: Matthew Helmus. Mapping the spread of SLF: a data science approach. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Eric Clifton, Cornell University; Co-Authors: Louela Castrillo, Ann Hajek. Diversity of Beauveria fungi infecting spotted lanternfly populations. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Liam Sullivan, APHIS PPQ S&T Otis Laboratory; University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Co-Authors: Juli Gould, Hannah Broadley. Developing a rearing method for Dryinus sinicus, a potential biological control agent of spotted lanternfly. Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Tyler Hagerty, University of Delaware. Non-target rearing techniques for SLF biocontrol testing Part 1: Auchenorrhyncha and Reduviidae.Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Alana Russell, University of Rhode Island; Co-Authors: Alex Baranowski, Lisa Tewksbury, Hannah Broadley, Juli Gould. Non-target rearing techniques for SLF biocontrol testing Part 2: Other Hemiptera, Lepidoptera, and Mantodea.Virtual SLF Early Career Professionals Symposium, May 15, 2020.
  • Type: Other Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Leach, H.L. Update on spotted lanternfly extension. 2020 Spotted Lanternfly Summit. Harrisburg PA. March 3-4, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Dechaine, A.*, T. Kuhar and D. G. Pfeiffer. 2019. Phenology of Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae) in Virginia. Entomol. Soc. Am. Annu. Mtng., St. Louis MO. Nov. 17-20.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Dechaine, A.*, T. Kuhar, D. G. Pfeiffer, S. Salom and T. C. Leskey. 2019. New investigations of Lycorma delicatula in Virginia. Entomol. Soc. Am., Eastern Branch, Blacksburg, VA. Mar 10-12.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Calvin D, Urban J, Leach H. Preliminary research results on spotted lanternfly (Lorcoma delicatula) egg mass dispersion patterns to estimate population densities. Paper presented at the North American Invasive Species Management Association Annual Conference, Oct. 2, 2019, Saratoga Springs, NY.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Urban J, Smyers E, Roberts D, Leach H. Research informing spotted lanternfly management across the SLF lifecycle. Paper presented at the North American Invasive Species Management Association Annual Conference, Oct. 2, 2019, Saratoga Springs, NY.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Taleb M, Urban J. Sooty mold associated with spotted lanternfly: An assessment of affected microbial communities over time. Presentation given at the Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America, St. Louis, MO, 17-20 Nov. 2019.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Urban J, Roberts D, Walsh B, Leach H, Calvin D, Rost J. Spotted lanternfly endosymbionts and reproductive development. Presentation given at the Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America, St. Louis, MO, 17-20 Nov. 2019.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Kirkpatrick, D., H. Leach, J. Urban, R. Cooper, R. Valentin, A. Nielsen, J. Lockwood, D. Fonseca, D. Pfeiffer and T. Leskey. 2019. Preliminary trapping study and host range results for spotted lanternfly. In IDEP Symposium entitled Spotted lanternfly from Detection to Major Pest: Biology Spread, and Control. Entomol. Soc. Am. Eastern Branch, Blacksburg, VA. Mar 10-12.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Pfeiffer, D. G. 2019. A major new invasive pest arrives in Virginia: Spotted lanternfly establishment and research needs. Sigma Xi Annu. Mtng., Madison WI. Nov 14-17.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Pfeiffer D. G., E. R. Day, T. Dellinger, A. Dechaine*, T. Kuhar and M. Sutphin. 2019. Addressing the expansion of range of spotted lanternfly in Virginia, and impacts on tree species. Entomol. Soc. Am. Annu. Mtng., St. Louis MO. Nov. 17-20.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Kaser, J.M., T. Hagerty, M. F. Cooperband, H. J. Broadley, J. R. Gould, C. Bartlett, K. A. Hoelmer. 2020 [May 14]. [Poster presentation] Behavioral response of the spotted lanternfly egg parasitoid Anastatus orientalis to chemical traces left by target and non-target adults. USDA Interagency Forum on Invasive Species.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Leach, H*., D. Biddinger, & J. Urban. 2019. Spotted lanternfly damage and phenology in fruit crops. 2019 Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting, Nov. 17-20, 2019. St. Louis, MO.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Biddinger, D.*, H. Leach, F. Zhu, J. Urban, & A. Hajek. 2019. Controlling spotted lanternfly with insecticides and biopesticides in fruit crops and possible impacts on pollinators and other non-target insects. 2019 Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting, Nov. 17-20, 2019. St. Louis, MO.
  • Type: Other Status: Submitted Year Published: 2019 Citation: Biddinger, D. J., H. Leach, B. Walsh, & J. Urban. 2019 Plant Protection Report: Spotted Lanternfly Nymphs and Adults on Peach and Grape. 11 p. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/David_Biddinger
  • Type: Other Status: Submitted Year Published: 2020 Citation: Biddinger, D. J., H. Leach, B. Walsh, & J. Urban. 2020 Plant Protection Report: Spotted Lanternfly control on grape, peach and sunflower. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/David_Biddinger , 10 p.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Harner A, Briggs L, Urban J, Leach H, and Centinari M. Preliminary insights into grapevine ecophysiological responses to Spotted lanternfly population density in Pennsylvania. American Society of Enology and Viticulture annual conference (Video presentation) June 15, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Moural T., N. Phan, E. Rajotte, D. Biddinger, F. Zhu. Mechanisms of comparative pesticide toxicities in bees. In Symposium: Mechanisms in Chemical Adaptation to Support Pest and Pollinator Management. Annual Meeting of ESA, St. Louis, MO, November 2019
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Biddinger D., H. Leach, A. Hajek, F. Zhu, J. Urban. Controlling Spotted lanternfly with insecticides and biopesticides in fruit crops and possible impacts pollinators and other non-target insects. In Symposium: Invasion of the Spotted Lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula, in North America. Annual Meeting of ESA, St. Louis, MO, November 2019
  • Type: Websites Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: StopSLF.org project website was launched in August 2020. The website (https://www.stopslf.org/index.cfm) includes basic information on spotted lanternfly along with the SCRI project objectives, team members, and reports.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Urban J, Roberts D, Walsh B, Leach H, Calvin D, Rost J. Preliminary insights into female SLF reproductive development and endosymbiont transmission. Paper presented at the 2nd Annual Spotted Lanternfly Working Group Meeting, Penn State FREC, Biglerville, PA, Oct. 29, 2019.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Dechaine, A.*, D. G. Pfeiffer, T. Kuhar and S. Salom. 2019. Phenology and host plant shifts of spotted lanternfly in Virginia. Paper presented at the 2nd Annual Spotted Lanternfly Working Group Meeting, Penn State FREC, Biglerville, PA, Oct. 29, 2019.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Centinari M., Harner A, Briggs L, Urban J, Leach H: Impacts of spotted lanternfly on grapevine physiology, fruit production and composition: Preliminary results. Paper presented at the 2nd Annual Spotted Lanternfly Working Group Meeting, Biglerville, PA, October 29, 2019.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Greg Krawcyzk, Henry Rice, Edwin Winzeler. Practical challenges with SLF research: monitoring and ovicidal bioassays. Paper presented at the 2nd Annual Spotted Lanternfly Working Group Meeting, Biglerville, PA, October 29, 2019.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: David Biddinger. Possible non-target impacts of spraying for SLF. Paper presented at the 2nd Annual Spotted Lanternfly Working Group Meeting, Biglerville, PA, October 29, 2019.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Heather Leach, Ashley Leach, Julie Urban, Michela Centinari, David Biddinger, Liz Deecher, and Lauren Briggs. Grower response and management of spotted lanternfly in vineyards.Paper presented at the 2nd Annual Spotted Lanternfly Working Group Meeting, Biglerville, PA, October 29, 2019.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Dennis Calvin, Erica Smyers, Julie Urban, John Rost, Mitzy Porras, Heather Leach, and Joseph Keller. Spotted lanternfly seasonal population development, phenology and dispersion. Paper presented at the 2nd Annual Spotted Lanternfly Working Group Meeting, Biglerville, PA, October 29, 2019.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2019 Citation: Tracy C. Leskey, Sharon K. Jones, Dalton C. Ludwick, Laura J. Nixon, and Karen Felton. SLF host breadth and rearing: quarantine and field studies. Paper presented at the 2nd Annual Spotted Lanternfly Working Group Meeting, Biglerville, PA, October 29, 2019.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Harper, J.K. Potential Economic Impact of the Spotted Lantern Fly on Agriculture and Forestry in Pennsylvania. Update on spotted lanternfly extension. 2020 Spotted Lanternfly Summit. Harrisburg PA. March 3-4, 2020.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2020 Citation: Krawczyk, G., H. Rice and E. H. Winzeler. 2020. Spotted lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula - a potential new invasive pest of grapes and fruit. Orchard Pests and Disease Management Conference. Portland, OR. January 08, 2020.