Source: UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - RIVER FALLS submitted to
CREATING CAREER PATHWAYS THROUGH INNOVATIVE AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE CURRICULUM AND OUTREACH
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
EXTENDED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
1015336
Grant No.
2018-70001-27834
Project No.
WISW-2017-09183
Proposal No.
2017-09183
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
NLGCA
Project Start Date
May 1, 2018
Project End Date
Apr 30, 2022
Grant Year
2018
Project Director
Rausch, B.
Recipient Organization
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - RIVER FALLS
410 SOUTH THIRD STREET
RIVER FALLS,WI 54022-5010
Performing Department
Animal and Food Science
Non Technical Summary
The University of Wisconsin - River Falls Department of Animal and Food Science is anually enrolling nearly four hundred undergraduate students with a stated career interest in the area of companion animal science. This intergrated proposal specifically addresses needs created by enrollment pressures of the program to generate innovative educational opportunity for the students. Through unique collaboration with two non-profit agencies, students will gain both strengthened classroom learning experiences, as well as opportunities for field-based internships.Supporting objectives are fourfold: (1) development of two novel companion animal science undergraduate courses, (2) expansion of the university's novel service dog training internship to include an Ambassador program with the aim of honing student leadership skills through public education and outreach, (3) creation of a intercollegiate network of North American colleges with undergraduate service dog training programs, culminating in a summit for idea-exchange and student collaboration, and (4) field-based internship development to engage students directly with underserved sectors of the pet-owning population through a nationally unique non-profit veterinary hopsital. The proposed high-impact activities will serve as models for other ungraduate animal science programs expanding into companion animal science disciplines. Enhancement of the companion animal program is especially poised to attract, recruit and retain students who lacked opportunity or access to traditional "gateway" agriculture experiences in the K-12 period, such as Agriculture Education curriculum, FFA and 4H. Students will emerge from the enhanced program prepared to lead, communicate and work collaboratively to create a diverse agriculture workforce that is representative of the national workforce.
Animal Health Component
100%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
(N/A)
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
90338301060100%
Goals / Objectives
The University of Wisconsin - River Falls Department of Animal Science annually enrolls nearly 400 students with a stated career interest in companion animal science. The goals of thisintegrated proposalare to specifically address needs created by enrollment pressures of the program and to generate innovative educational opportunities. Through collaboration with two non-profit agencies, students will gain both strengthened classroom learning experiences, as well as opportunities for field-based internships.Supporting objectives are threefold: (1) development of two novel companion animal science undergraduate courses, (2) expansion of the university's current service dog training internship to include an Ambassador program with the aim of honing student leadership skills through education and outreach, and (3) field-based internship development to engage students directly with underserved sectors of the pet-owning population through a nationally unique non-profit veterinary hospital. These high-impact activities will serve as models for other undergraduate animal science programs throughout the country that are expanding into companion animal science disciplines. Enhancement of the companion animal program is especially poised to recruit and retain students who lacked opportunity or access to traditional "gateway" agriculture experiences in the K-12 period (Agriculture Education, FFA, 4H). Students will emerge from the enhanced program prepared to lead, communicate and work collaboratively to create a diverse agriculture workforce representative of the national workforce.Objective 1: Educational: Course Developmentdevelopment of two additional core course offeringspurchase of equipment and instrumentation essential to core companion animal course learning outcomesObjective 2: Educational / Outreach: Capacity building in the newly developed Assistance Dog Education Program and Training (ADEPT)Augmentation of the current ADEPT internship through creation of Ambassador program activities, cultivating additional student leadership and team experiences (locally, nationally, internationally).Within this internship framework, develop a North American intercollegiate network of university programs that involve assistance dog raising and training by undergraduate students.Objective 3: Educational / Outreach: Internship developmentGeneration of innovative and unparalleled field-based undergraduate internship experiences at a nationally unique, non-profit full-service veterinary hospital. Internship design and development will build on established outreach activities to underserved communities of pet owners, including: veterans, persons with disabilities and low-income populations of companion animal owners.Project Alignments and Contributions to the Legislatively Authorized Purpose of the NIFA Program:USDA Strategic Plan Goal 1 Assist rural communities to create prosperity so they are self-sustaining, re-populating, and economically thriving. Sub-goals (a): leveraging capital markets to increase Government's investment in rural America and (b): Increase agricultural opportunities by creating new marketsThe companion animal industry is a diverse array of small businesses, corporations, non-profits and NGO's. The industry is underserved by agricultural college curriculum, and is ripe for business development opportunities. An example of direct alignment of this proposal with this goal is the proposed educational development of science-based, professional trainers and educators, employable in rural markets.USDA-REF Action Plan Goal 6 Education and Science Literacy. Sub-goals: (a) Cultivate, recruit and graduate the next generation of a highly-skilled diverse workforce that will contribute to innovations in food, agriculture, natural resources, and human sciences and (b) recruit a diverse pre-collegiate, undergraduate and graduate student population, minority and non-minority studentsThe companion animal program is able to recruit and retain undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds, including first-generation students, students from low-income backgrounds, and students lacking a traditional farming background. The program is particularly accessible for students interested in animal science and the agricultural/animal health industry, but lacking previous opportunities to engage with the agricultural industry through applied experiences such as FFA, 4H or agricultural education programs during their K-12 education.Sub-goals (c): provide practical learning experiences to increase awareness to all youth about educational pathways and career opportunities in agriculture and (d) use non-formal education programs, outreach, 4-H, and other youth development programs to transfer knowledge and technology?.Formation of the ADEPT Ambassador program carries the primary objective of public outreach and educational activity for school youth and other interested public and private sector organizations.Sub-goal (e): enhance existing partnerships with land-grant universities and other educational organizations to identify and assist socially disadvantaged and limited resource producers, beginning farmers, women producers, and veterans, and to remove program barriers to participation.The proposed collaboration is unique: UW-River Falls (non-land grant college of agriculture), Mission Animal Hospital (non-profit full service veterinary hospital) and Pawsitive Perspectives Assistance Dogs (non-profit assistance dog organization) PawPADs uses the educational process of training service dogs as part of the overall objective of partnering assistance dogs with humans and facilities. Clients include, or have included: persons with physical disabilities, Type 1 diabetics, youth-at-risk programs, public school programs, VA facilities, prison programs, U.S. State Department (Mongolia) and social service agencies providing victim advocacy.Advocacy and outreach opportunities through the ADEPT Ambassador Program would impact professionals and persons in: education (school resource dogs, students with service dogs), rehabilitation (occupational, physical, communication therapies), legal (victim advocacy programs, access issues), human health care centers (applications of animal-assisted therapy), 4H organizations (training methodology, international communities interested in advancing companion animal interaction/treatment) and veterinary medicine. As already evidenced by the span of focused outreach listed previously, potential impacts of Ambassador activity will be far-reaching: local, regional, national and international.NIFA Strategic Plan Goal 1 Science: Catalyze Exemplary and Relevant Research, Education and Extension Programs Sub-goal (a): Ensure the development of human capital, communities, and a diverse workforce through research, education, extension and engagement programs in food and agricultural sciences to support a sustainable agriculture system. See above: USDA-REF Action Plan Goal 6, sub-goal (a).Integration of biological and social sciences. Sub-goal (a): successful and powerful academic foundations toward needed expertise and relevant professional skills employers anticipate and value; for example, in government nonprofits, social services, education institutions, and businesses.The activities of the proposal, in particular the course proposal for ANSC 318 Assistance Dog Industry and Training, and the ADEPT Ambassador program, directly align with these goals, producing students of diverse disciplinary majors (animal science, pre-veterinary and veterinary technology, psychology, criminal justice, sociology, education, and human health service providers (physical and occupational therapy, communicative disorders)), who are prepared to lead, educate and advocate for the partnering of humans and companion animals.
Project Methods
Objective 1: Course development and infrastructure support - UWRF Companion Animal emphasis.Methods : ANSC 318 Assistance Dog Industry and Training offered once/year. Course topics to be inclusive of a broad spectrum of undergraduate majors. The course will provide training demonstrations, as well as examples of assistance dog partnering and work, and will benefit dramatically from the presence of dogs currently being trained and handled by ADEPT students. To meet objectives for multidisciplinary student engagement, the course will be open to broad university enrollment.Methods: ANSC 422 Exotics Care and Management offered once/year. The diversity of animal species in this course will necessitate advanced instructional methods, blending online preparatory assignments and supplemental reading with in-class lecture. Prerequisites reflect the intended rigor of the course. Content will include: case examples, reflections of trends in the industry, field trips, in-class speakers and appropriate peer-reviewed bodies of literature to supplement textbook chapters.Evaluation 1. Measures of student learning and engagement: course evaluations at semester-end, instructor evaluation by departmental faculty observation. 2. Measures of student numbers impacted by proposed course development: enrollment data for students interested in the course content. Successful course completion: students attaining grade C or higher. The evaluation plan also includes: (1) metrics summarizing who benefited most and least (course grade distribution (objective); student reflection statements (subjective) at end of course) (2) explanation of revisions and improvements to increase the project's value will be provided by the instructor during course progress and as a final course summary of revisions to enhance student learning and (3) improvements to make project more cost-effective (evaluation printing costs, filed trip expenses, and textbook use).Objective 2a: Cultivation of additional student leadership and team experiences through ADEPT.Method: ADEPT Ambassador Program: 12 paid internships: 4 / year. Upon successful completion of the first semester ADEPT internship, students will have the option of entering the second-semester ADEPT Ambassador internship to further craft a skillset in leadership, advocacy, and communication. During the internship experience, students will receive both applied team-training experience with their assigned assistance dog-in-training and foundational instruction to cultivate leadership and communication skills necessary for public engagement. Co-PI Ball will develop and oversee operation of the internship. PI-Rausch will serve as faculty coordinator for the internship. The ADEPT Ambassador program would arrange delivery of presentations and demonstrations to interested institutions and public/private associations. Student activity will occur at existing local and regional level (schools, civic organizations, 4H groups, campus visit events for prospective students, and government /social service organizations). Larger-scale outreach activities will be developed in the following directions:leverage the existing Falcon 4H student organization to develop potential presentation at the intercollegiate 4H conference and national 4H conference,develop an intercollegiate summit hosting students from North American colleges that have service dog training clubs or programs, to be hosted at the UW-River Falls campus, andform an international outreach experience over J-term or summer to connect the American service dog industry to interested organizations forming internationallyEvaluation: 1. Measures of student learning and engagement: student evaluations, numbers of students enrolling in and successfully completing the ADEPT Ambassador program. Reflective statements of each outreach experience will be assessed. Each outreach audience will be surveyed to assess impact and quality of presentation, student preparation, and suggestions for improvement. 2. Measures of student numbers impacted by proposed course development: enrollment data, successful internship completion and number of outreach engagements attended will provide objective data to assess student impact. The evaluation plan includes the following: (1) metrics summarizing who benefited most and least (numbers of students successfully completing the internship and student reflection statements), (2) explanation of revisions, improvements and enhancements to increase value of the project will be provided by Ms. Ball during internship progress and as a final summary of revisions to enhance student learning (3) improvements to make project more cost-effective (printing costs, transportation and presentation fees, and materials).Objective 2b: Development of an intercollegiate network of students training service dogsMethod: During Year 1, a list of potential members would be generated, drawing from both academic sources and current non-profit assistance dog organizations. Initial contact would be email format and phone conferencing, with end-goal being the development of an on-site summit hosted by UWRF in the third year. The summit would bring together collegiate service dog groups groups as well as service dog organizations to foster greater collaborative relationships within this industry. The summit would provide a forum for idea exchange via round-table discussion, student presentations and industry speakers.Evaluation: Measures of student learning, outreach and engagement will be provided by tabulation of organizations contacted, as well as organizations responding to online / phone engagement, and organizations interested in formation of an onsite intercollegiate experience. With successful planning and realization of an on-site summer workshop, evaluations of the workshop experience would generate valuable information for revisions, improvement and enhancements.Objective 3a: Development of 9 rotating internships for Companion Animal students at a nonprofit veterinary medical center.Method: 3 internships/year; 200 hours/internship. Hours will be divided among both medical and management staff. Students will have skills checklists and a final written case study as internship components. Completion will demonstrate an understanding case flow and hopsital management.Objective 3b. Development of 9 paid internships through mobile veterinary outreach practiceMethod: Field-based internship through the mobile veterinary unit of Mission Animal Hospital, 3 internships/year; 200 hours/internship. Students to provide start-to-finish support for the medical and surgical service of the mobile practice, including patient check-in, assessment and post-operative recovery instructions with owners. PI-Rausch will serve as faculty coordinator for the internships.Evaluation of Objective 3 a and b: 1. Measures of student learning and engagement: Student evaluations, Numbers of students enrolling in and successfully completing the internship. Assessment of outreach summaries and reflective statements. 2. Measures of student numbers impacted by proposed course development: Enrollment data, successful internship completion and number of students participating in the internship. The evaluation plan includes the following: (1) metrics summarizing who benefited most and least (numbers of students successfully completing the internship as well as student reflection statements), (2) explanation of revisions, improvements and enhancements to increase value of the project will be provided by Dr. Albright.

Progress 05/01/19 to 04/30/20

Outputs
Target Audience:UW-River Falls Animal Science students (300 students, 2019-2020 enrollment) • Dunnn County Humane Society staff, animal populatioin and greater Dunn County population being served by the animal shelter services • Mission Animal Hospital staff, clientele and underserved communities lacking access to affordable veterinary services: veteran populations, disabled persons using service animals (dogs) and low-income metropolitan or remote/rural communities. • Persons with disabilities seeking service animals (dogs) • Incarcerated populations engaged with training service animals (dogs) • Community organizations (4H, breed clubs, non-profit volunteer base, etc.) seeking education / information regarding service dog training Changes/Problems:Undoubtedly, the major change has been the impact of COVID-19 on planned events for Year Three, including the intercollegiate service dog summit as well as 2020-2021 Oshkosh field trip to perform community education and prison educational exchange forum, and wellness clinic travel to the Red Lake Nation. Classes were moved suddenly to an online platform, creating additional and unexpected workload challenges. We will meet these challenges head on through the provision of novel online content, and the use of safe social distancing allowed by the large multi-use classroom space awarded in Year Two. What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?Applied skills in the following areas: safe animal handling and restraint, veterinary assistance, program management, community outreach, written and oral communication, professional networking, community education, leadership training and advanced service dog training (puppy to placement). How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?Product results (animal served) reporting to Red Lake Nation animal rescue non-profit Course enrollment and student evaluations reported through Acvitity Insight at UW-River Falls Feedback to Journey Together Service Dog Organization, with novel and expanded collaboration under development. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals? Final purchasing phase (supplies and equipment) of the project now that designated space has been obtained. Continued updating and enhancement of core coursework Mentorship of incoming new faculty Expansion of collaborations with Journey Together Service Dog Organization

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? Course development: ANSC 321 Companion Animal Care and Management (Rausch) has passed through faculty governance and is now one of four required corse courses in the Companion Animal emphasis in the Animal Science major. ANSC 421: Pilot field experience for 12 Animal Science - Companion Animal students: Fall, 2019. Overnight travel to Oshkosh, WI for three activities: networking casual dinner experience with the Board Members of Journey Together Service Dog group, instruction to community-based class for Animal CPR, Educational Exchange with incarcerated inmates in the Journey Together Service Dog Training Program. ANSC 490 Independent Study: 8 students enrolled (summer session and fall semester) to partake in off-site epxeriential learning pilot course. The field experience course was developed and supervised by Rausch (PI) to provide a three-day veterinary clinical experience at Red Lake Nation Reservation in Redby, MN. Students gained skills such as animal handling and restraint, vaccine administration, basic health assessment, orphaned neonatal care and feeding, therapeutic grooming with sedation, client communication and mnagement of wellness care for low-income / underserved community. ANSC 389 Service Dog Insdutry (Ball), underdevelopment in Year Two for instruction, Year Three. Capacity Building: Three major developments in this area occurred during Year Two. First, the emphasis was awarded desginated teaching space in Hagestad Hall. The area is generous in size and allows abundant multipurpose use: private meeting room, secure storage of program equipment, demonstration space that accomodates animal use, and lecture space for fourty students. Second, under faculty guidance and mentorship, a new student organization was formed (with constitution and by-laws) called "CAPS": Companion Animal Professional Society. It held it's first meeting in late February, 2020, and will have a virtual meeting since the suspension of campus activity due to the pandemic. Student enrollment is at 76, which is remarkable for a club that formed and enrolled new membership during the school year (as opposed to the typical "Fall Activity Round-up"), and reflective of campuswide interest in companion animal science and professions. Third, the university awarded a tenure-track facuty position for the companion animal emphasis, the third designated position in a six year timespan. The position was filled, and the third Companion Animal faculty member will begin August, 2020. Internship: ADEPT 15 students Mission Animal Hospital 1 student Dunn County Humane Society 2 students

Publications

  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Accepted Year Published: 2019 Citation: Ball, L., S. Miller and B. Rausch. Creating Career Pathways through Innovative Agricultural Science and Outreach. Poster Presentation. NARRU Annual Conference Proceedings, October, 2019.


Progress 05/01/18 to 04/30/19

Outputs
Target Audience:Target Audience: UW-River Falls Animal Science students (250 students, 2018-2019 enrollment) Dunnn County Humane Society staff, animal populatioin and greater Dunn County population being served by the animal shelter services Mission Animal Hospital staff, clientele and underserved communities lacking access to affordable veterinary services: veteran populations, disabled persons using service animals (dogs) and low-income metropolitan or remote/rural communities. Persons with disabilities seeking service animals (dogs) Incarcerated populations engaged with training service animals (dogs) Community organizations (4H, breed clubs, non-profit volunteer base, etc.) seeking education / information regarding service dog training Efforts: Curriculum development: Course development: Novel content for the Companion Animal program at UW-River Falls was provided through a pilot course: ANSC 389 Special topics: Companion Animal during Spring Semester 2019. This course enrolled 30 students, and had a wait list of three students. One student left the university during the semester; 29 completed the course successfully. This course successfully passed faculty governance to be implemented as a required, 3-credit course offering within the Animal Science - Companion Animal emphasis core coursework. It will be offered annually, both fall and spring semesters, beginning fall semester 2019. This represents a significant achievement of project objectives at an accelerated pace. This success will enable expansion of project activity into additional areas of curriculum and program development, with one such example listed directly below - formation of the Companion Animal Studies minor. Programming development: Enrollment in the Companion Animal emphasis now parallels the historically largest emphasis in the Animal Science department - equine. Both emphases enroll around 250 students. Also of significant importance is the fact that interest in Companion Animal course offerings is very strong from students not specifically enrolled in the Companion Animal emphasis. This includes students from across multi-discipline areas such as Ag Business, Broad Area Ag studies, Ag Education, Pre-professional students (pre-veterinary) in Biology and Chemistry, and Veterinary Technology students. Some of these students desiring access to the companion animal coursework but not necessarily the Animal Science major, can now be served by the flexible option of a Companion Animal Studies minor. This minor was created as a result of the interest in the coursework, the enrollment pressures on the courses, and the accelerated pace of the course development activities of the project (see above). The Companion Animal Studies minor was approved by faculty governance in the spring of 2019 and will be implemented for students beginning Fall 2019. Equipment and Supplies purchasing: Major purchases during the first year of the project included the acquisition of simulator models for student hands-on learning activities. These simulators obliviate the dependency on live-animal use, which has significantly reduced cost and challenges associated with live-animal use, particularly because companion animals are regulated under the Animal Welfare Act, impacting teaching use and demonstration. Supplies and equipment were also purchased to expand experiential learning components of the ANSC 421 Canine and Feline Care and Management course. Internship development: 18 students ADEPT 15 students Mission Animal Hospital 1 student Dunn County Humane Society 2 students Community outreach: ADEPT, through development of the ambassador internship program, provided student-lead community outreach in the form of presentations and demonstrations to the following organizations: Ezekiel Lutheran Church Adult Learning forum (18 individuals), Among Friends Dementia program (30 individuals), and UWRF Big Brothers and Big Sisters organization (6 youth). Additionally, the interns travelled to Oshkosh WI to collaborate with Journey Together Service Dog prison training program (32 inmates), organizing an Educational exchange clinic, to exchange ideas and experiences with training service dogs. Changes/Problems:The new course that was developed during the first year of the project revealed significant student interest in companionate animal species other than dogs and cats, especially non-domestic species (avian, reptile, amphibian, aquatic and some small mammals). Not surprisingly, the students are eager to learn about the challenges of husbandry and healthcare for the thousands of species of animals that fall into this category. This area of education is entirely unique at the undergraduate level and within Animal Science, which has traditionally focused on domestic animal species benefitting human populations for food and fiber. Furthermore, undergraduate education for these animal species has traditionally been provided through biology departments, focusing wildlife ecology and thereby inherently lacking information regarding captive management, as well as issues involving captive wildlife welfare and human society. Awareness of the opportunity to further improve the quality of the companion animal program has led to additional planned activities for the coming year, as described in this report. What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?Upon reflection, it is fair to acknowledge that the accelerated pace, demands and success of the (above) course and programming development came at the expense of activities in the area of professional development for the PI. That said, a significant area of professional development was achieved through pursuit of certification for Basic Life Support (BLS) and Advanced Life Support (ALS) through the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society RECOVR initiative (8.5 hrs). Successful completion of this 9-hour veterinary course, juxtaposed with the purchase of the Canine CPR simulators, has uniquely positioned Rausch, PI to expand opportunity for student-lead animal CPR instruction to broader sectors of the community. This opportunity captures a novel and untapped community service while concurrently providing companion animal students with additional opportunities to develop and hone leadership and education skills through assistance with community-based instruction. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?Dunn County Humane Society newsletter to report on the student internship and the progress in feline housing modifications through internship activity. Student presentations at the National Council on Undergraduate Research symposium, Green Bay Wisconsin, Mar 2019 (2 posters and abstracts). Educational exchange clinic with Journey Together Service Dog program and their prison-based service dog training program. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?Without question, this grant award has provided significant and substantial means of support that were critically needed within the large and growing Animal Science - Companion Animal emphasis at UW-River Falls. The robust activity that occurred in the first year resulted in stable implementation of three different internship programs, a course with rapid and successful passage through faculty governance, and an entirely new program in the Companion Animal Studies minor, also passed through faculty governance. The year 1 foundational work revealed that diverse experiential learning opportunities with live companion animals, especially exotics, are still lacking in the emphasis. This is primarily due to the program's rapid growth and large enrollment.Accommodating these educational experiences for such a large population poses numerous challenges, not the least of which are concerns regarding animal welfare, as addressed by AWA regulations that include strict protocol for the use of companion animals for teaching and demonstration purposes. One idea to address this challenge is to partner with agencies that would benefit from student enthusiasm and desire to learn. This idea will be developed over the next year of project activity, and includes plans to develop collaborative educational experiences both domestically and internationally. In addition to the activities originally proposed, the following lists new proposed activities to accomplish the overarching goal of building capacity for a comprehensive companion animal program at UW-River Falls: Domestic activitites: Develop partnership with Journey Together Service Dog Organization in order to expand educational exchange clinics to include not only the incarcerated population of service dog trainers, but also to volunteers associated with Journey Together and 4H groups / kennel clubs interested in service dog industry. Mission Animal Hospital: provision of student support teams for mobile clinic operations serving low-income rural populations and Native American reservation populations who are currently experiencing veterinary medical care access deficiencies and / or feral companion animal population control issues. Develop partnership with Rosie's Red Lake Animal Rescue. Envisioned are student support teams to provide structured, supervised support in a predictable manner for their seasonal and field-based veterinary services at the Red Lake Ojibwe reservation. International Activities: Wildlife Institute of Belize: spring-break travel to Belize to learn about the health and management issues pertaining tonon-domestic species of animals commonly kept as pets, namely herptile and psittacine species. Professional development through faculty exploration of additional opportunities in Thailand (elephants and small animal clinics) and Ecuador (Amazon-based field experiences) pilot course offering ANSC 389 Companion Animal Field Experiences in Spring 2020 that includes a required spring break international field experience in Belize pilot course offering ANSC 389 Companion Animal Field experiences that expands the Belize field experience from 10 days to 21 days. Other activities: continued equipment purchases, pending acquisition of space at UW-River Falls (awaiting administrative approval). additional course development in area of off-site experiential learning (see above) expanded reporting of project activities through conference (NACTA) poster presentations and abstract proceedings continued development of ADEPT activities

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? Enrollment in the UW-River Falls Animal Science - Companion Animal emphasis continues to expand. Of special note, this enrollment draws non-traditional and under-represented populations in the U.S. agriculture workforce. As well as many first-generation students, the emphasis enrolls students from Hmong, Native American, Black and Hispanic populations, as well as international students and students with LGBTQ identities. The ability to address the education needs and career objectives of these student populations, while providing a pathway into agriculturally-oriented careers, directly achieves the over-arching objecting of the NIFA NLGCA award - to diversify the United States agricultural workforce to more directly reflect the diverse face of the American workforce population. With enthusiasm, we are happy to report that core course development proceeded at an accelerated rate during the first year of the three-year project. This acceleration allowed expansion of project activity into an unplanned area (programming). Now that we have met this goal, we are embarking on exceeding it through addressing the continued student demand for experiential learning within the companion animal sciences. Objective 1: Educational: Course Development development of two additional core course offerings purchase of equipment and instrumentation essential to core companion animal course learning outcomes Course development: A course developed during Summer and Fall Semester 2018 (Rausch, PI) was offered as a pilot course for Spring semester, 2019. This 2-credit course was expanded and submitted as a 3-credit course proposal, which passed faculty governance in the Spring of 2019. The course was accepted into the core curriculum for the Animal Science major - Companion Animal emphasis as ANSC 321 Companion Animal Care and Management, a 3-credit lecture-based course, to be offered both fall and spring semesters annually. Initial offering of this novel course will begin Fall Semester, 2019. Programming development: The companion animal coursework faces enrollment pressures from students in other majors (pre-veterinary, ag business, education, veterinary technology among others), and students enrolled in other species emphases in the ANSC major. Some students are finding that their career objectives would be best-served by a minor in the companion animal coursework. There was no such option available to UW-River Falls students. The existent Animal Science minor included coursework focusing solely on production animal species and management, which was not serving the career objectives of the novel student population in the Animal Science major. To serve this interest, Rausch proposed and successfully developed a Companion Animal Studies minor, which was accepted by faculty governance in the spring of 2019. This new minor will be available for students beginning Fall Semester, 2019. Continuing under this goal were the initial purchases made during 2018-2019 to support the laboratory components of the ANSC 421 Advanced Canine and Feline Care and Management course. These purchases addressed the pressing need for hands-on learning in this capstone course through the use of simulators, namely: canine limbs (4), canine CPR models (5), skin models (4), ear models (4) and oral / jaw models (4) and fluid-delivery systems (5). These models allow students to learn and practice: wound care, triage / field first-aid, basic life support, grooming, fluid support, and recognition of basic canine and feline pathologies related to common care practices through all life stages. Additional supplies were purchased to assist in the delivery of content pertaining to safe handling / safe restraint procedures. Objective 2: Educational / Outreach: Capacity building in the newly developed Assistance Dog Education Program and Training (ADEPT) Augmentation of the current ADEPT internship through creation of Ambassador program activities, cultivating additional student leadership and team experiences (locally, nationally, internationally). Ball, co-PI, expanded enrollment in ADEPT from 7 students to 15 students, and began implementation of the Ambassador internship through cultivation of more advanced training and teamwork skills of returning students in the ADEPT program. In addition to providing community outreach in the form of educational presentations and demonstrations of service dog work, the returning interns served as mentors to newly enrolled interns, assisting with the learning process for service dog training as well as animal care. The students participated in an on-site summer clinic at Pawsitive Perspectives training center, learning the ADA laws and regulations surrounding service dogs, public access training, and care of the dogs. Students traveled to Oshkosh, WI to participate in an educational exchange with Oshkosh State Correctional Institute inmates involved in the Journey Together Service Dog training program. Additionally, students enrolled in the novel Ambassador program began community outreach activity through provision of educational seminars and demonstrations both on-campus and through the broader community. Objective 3: Educational / Outreach: Internship development Generation of innovative and unparalleled field-based undergraduate internship experiences at a nationally unique, non-profit full-service veterinary hospital. Internship design and development will build on established outreach activities to under-served communities of pet owners, including: veterans, persons with disabilities and low-income populations of companion animal owners. Development of novel internship offerings in the Companion Animal program began during summer of 2018, with successful implementation of three slots at two locations: Dunn County Humane Society (DCHS), Menomonie, WI (2 internships) and Mission Animal Hospital, Eden Prairie, MN (1 internship). At DCHS, the interns were immersed in the daily operations of a county-run animal shelter. Experiential education was provided in the form of animal care, animal health, public service and communication and non-profit management. Additionally, the students successfully presented results of a project to develop feline housing portal modifications; the results of this project allowed additional development of plans for installation of new feline housing in the animal shelter. These results were communicated in a student-lead NCUR poster presentation an abstract publication in Spring, 2019. At MAH, the intern rotated through this large, non-profit veterinary hospital in the departments of: human resources, community outreach / fundraising, veterinary mobile practice operations in under-served communities, and veterinary technology. All students in each of the internship areas (ADEPT, DCHS, MAH) report high satisfaction with the learning areas and the overall experience. In the case of the MAH internship, the experience lead to full-time employment with the hospital.

Publications