Source: UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA submitted to
2017 CROP PROTECTION AND PEST MANAGEMENT EXTENSION IMPLEMENTATION PROJECT FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
EXTENDED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
1013962
Grant No.
2017-70006-27149
Project No.
FLA-ENY-005649
Proposal No.
2017-04448
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
EIP
Project Start Date
Sep 1, 2017
Project End Date
Aug 31, 2019
Grant Year
2018
Project Director
Leppla, N. C.
Recipient Organization
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
G022 MCCARTY HALL
GAINESVILLE,FL 32611
Performing Department
Entomology and Nematology
Non Technical Summary
The University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences IPM Program provides statewide, interdisciplinary and inter-unit coordination and assistance in IPM to protect agriculture, communities and the environment (http://ipm.ifas.ufl.edu ). This IPM program, conducted in partnership with the well-established Extension community, is helping to develop and deliver more effective, safe and sustainable IPM options, along with the training required for them to be widely adopted. In addition to coordination (20%), the 2017 CPPM, EIP project includes four sub-projects: "Non-traditional IPM change agents (NICA) providing programming for housing and residential environments" (Priority- IPM Implementation in Communities, 20%), "Enhance the Florida Collaborative Plant Pest and Disease Diagnostic System" (Priority- IPM Support for Pest Diagnostic Facilities, 20%), "Pest and natural enemy profiles in conventional and GMO cotton cultivars in North Florida" (Priority- IPM Implementation in Agronomic Crops, 20%), and "A searchable database website and trained citizen scientist network to promote vetted pollinator plants and enhance pollinator health" (Priority- IPM for Pollinator Health, 20%). The sub-projects will be conducted by four workgroups consisting of 10 Project Directors and Co-PIs, and initially eight county Extension faculty members from seven counties. The overall objective will be to expand the Extension IPM programs into as many counties as resources permit, particularly for the housing and residential environments and enhanced diagnostic system sub-projects. The pollinator project will apply statewide and at least in the southeast. Results of the GMO cotton project also will benefit the region. All sub-projects are new and will be self-sustaining after three years.
Animal Health Component
0%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
(N/A)
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
21624101130100%
Goals / Objectives
IPM Coordination for the University of Florida1. Support and encourage Extension faculty in conducting IPM projects2. Coordinate and report on the multi-disciplinary IPM projects3. Assist county-level IPM activities and collaborative workgroupsHousing and Residential Environments Housing1. Diversify IPM messengers who will incorporate IPM into existing housing programs2. Develop and deliver materials and tools needed to increase residential IPMPlant Pest and Disease Diagnostic System1. Revitalize the Florida Plant Diagnostic Network (FPDN)2. Expand partnerships and involvement in the UF/IFAS Pest Alert listservIPM for Cotton Cultivars in North Florida1. Establish a sentinel cotton plot at WREC following agronomic practices of the Florida panhandle2. Evaluate the occurrence and abundance of the pests and beneficial insects in the WREC plot and commercial cotton fields3. Produce and disseminate management guidelines, and train cotton producer's and agricultural professional's to identify cotton pests and natural enemies Pollinator Plants and Pollinator Health1. Expand the Ecological Plant Database by adding vetted pollinator plants2. Develop and deliver training in identifying plants, plant parts and arthropods3. Conduct a citizen science project to provide training in submitting pollinator plants
Project Methods
IPM Coordination for the University of Florida- Form collaborative project teams; collaborate with state and county Extension faculty to develop and deliver IPM training and services; provide educational resources, such as high caliber instruction and publications; conduct applied IPM research to generate new IPM technologies; partner with federal, state, county and commodity organizations; and mentor faculty and students.Housing and Residential Environments Housing- Conduct annual in-service training on IPM through UF/IFAS Extension's on-site Pest Management University or other appropriate alternative, provide feedback as the Non-Traditional IPM Change Agents (NICA) project working group on amendments to better target resident clientele, provide 1 hour of IPM programming as part of existing Extension housing programs, provide measureable impacts on IPM knowledge, attitude, and behavior change through agent and clientele assessments.Plant Pest and Disease Diagnostic System- Increasing the speed, accuracy and effectiveness of local plant pest and disease scouting and identification; increase high-risk sample submission; enhance first detector and diagnostic capabilities; provide resources for appropriate sample submission; assure rapid digital and actual specimen delivery; enhance the "Florida Pest Diagnostic System;" and revitalize the "Florida Pest Alert listserv."IPM for Cotton Cultivars in North Florida- Organize a select producer and county Extension agent advisory committee, establish sentinel plots, identify pest and beneficial insects in the plots, develop a downloadable APP, deliver science-based knowledge on the seasonal, stage-specific occurrence and abundance of the pests and beneficial insects associated with cotton.Pollinator Plants and Pollinator Health- Expand a searchable website containing a comprehensive database of vetted pollinator plants, add plant information and pollinator plants based on research literature, solicit online or mobile submission of photographs and associated information, conduct a train-the-trainer workshop curriculum with presentations, educational resources (printed and electronic), activities (i.e. transects) and methods and resources for identifying plants, plant parts and arthropods, as well as methods for determining pollinator presence through use of transects, traps and digital photography.

Progress 09/01/17 to 08/31/18

Outputs
Target Audience:IPM Coordination for the University of Florida: State, regional and national IPM Stakeholders; commodity associations; agricultural producers; the general public; end users or consumers; underserved communities; land-grant university partners; research, teaching and Extension faculty; staff and students; and federal, state and county governmental agencies. Housing and Residential Environments Housing: Early adopter housing and horticulture agent teams from eight different counties (Citrus, Escambia, Holmes, Jefferson, Seminole, Suwanee, Volusia, Washington) and others in Florida for delivery to housing program participants, 1,200 total residents from up to 12 counties (Proportionate by population). Plant Pest and Disease Diagnostic System: Extension programs in pest and disease diagnostics, UF/IFAS; FDACS, DPI; USDA, APHIS; and USDA, ARS. IPM for Cotton Cultivars in North Florida: Extension agents, Extension specialists, and cotton producers from the Florida Panhandle, Cotton Incorporated. Pollinator Plants and Pollinator Health: Extension faculty, the general public, Green Industry professionals, NRCS program staff or users, plant and gardening organizations (Master Gardeners, garden clubs, plant societies, etc.), environmentally focused societies (Xerces Society, etc.), honey producers, and urban planners. Changes/Problems: Nothing Reported What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?For Coordination: The following Doctor of Plant Medicine ½-time assistants have received training on the project: Nicole Casuso, graduated 2017, Extension materials; Lanette Sobel, 2015-2019, forest entomology research; Alex Gannon 2017-2019, applied research, stink bugs, Extension presentations; Sage Thompson 2018-2021, applied research, stink bugs, Extension presentations and materials; Morgan Pinkerton, 2017-2019, applied research, stink bugs, Extension presentations and materials; Ph.D. Cory Penca, 2016-2018, applied research, stink bugs; Simon Yeboah, 2017-2019, applied research, tropical fruit flies; Yasaman Moghaddassi, 2017-2019, applied research, parasitoid wasp; and M.S. Arjun Khadka, 2017-2018, applied research, stink bugs. For Housing and Residential Environments Housing: On January 29-20, 2018, an Extension in-service training was attended by Judy Corbus (Washington and Holmes counties), Julie Shoup (Jefferson), Katherine Allen (Suwanee), Carolyn Saft (Suwanee), Lisa Hamilton (Volusia), Dorothy Lee (Escambia), Sarah Ellis (Citrus), Barbara Hughes (Seminole), Karen Stauderman (Volusia), and Kaydie McCormick (Seminole). Katherine Allen taught the IPM segment at least three times through her homebuyer program. For Plant Pest and Disease Diagnostic System: On May 17, 2018, a Master Gardener photography and entomology training was conducted in Sumter County led by DPM students Sage Thompson and Clayton Bania, and DPM Director Amanda Hodges. For IPM for Cotton Cultivars in North Florida: In the first year, the co-PI received the following training and professional development: A) Mandatory training Group 1, IRB-01 on the Human Subjects Research and Group 3, Social/Behavioral Research Investigators and Key Personnel, B) Assessing needs and priorities in Extension programming, and C) Program evaluation training - Extension Road Map. The project will have the participation of a UF Ph.D. student and a Visiting Scientist from Brazil. For Pollinator Plants and Pollinator Health: Active training will occur in Year 2 but some citizen scientists already are using an app (https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/pollinators-of-florida). How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?For Coordination: Future outcomes of the project may affect society in general primarily by reducing the environmental impact of invasive pests and diseases, thereby increasing the profitability and sustainability of agricultural and horticultural enterprises.We endeavor to disseminate information that will create an IPM culture among Florida's citizens that will replace the automatic dependence on pesticides. For Housing and Residential Environments Housing: We seek to increase IPM awareness among the general public by delivering a science-based IPM message directly to consumers and diversifying the IPM messengers to encourage the practice of IPM. We provided training to the pest management industry, Extension agents, homebuyers, and others throughout the State. For Plant Pest and Disease Diagnostic System: This state-wide collaborative effort has been directed at potential first detectors, e.g., Extension agents and their clientele. Specialty crop growers are primary recipients and beneficiaries. For IPM for Cotton Cultivars in North Florida: We are continuously producing and disseminating management guidelines and training cotton producers and agricultural professionals to identify cotton pests and natural enemies. Extension materials related to cotton pests and Bt technology is produce and delivered to farmers and agricultural professionals via presentations and hands-on exercises. For Pollinator Plants and Pollinator Health: Our project will increase the use of plants that enhance pollinator health by creating a pollinator plant database website using engaged citizen scientists to contribute nominations of pollinator plants that are further vetted by our expert workgroup. The resulting database website will assist residents and professionals with the selection and use of plants that enhance pollinator health in Florida and throughout the Nation. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?For Coordination: The 2017-20 USDA, NIFA, CPPM, EIP Project for the University of Florida will be managed effectively, including overseeing the four subprojects. The IPM Florida website will be continuously updated with new content. The website structure leads clientele directly to information that can help them solve pest problems. There were 174,831 website visits in 2017. Extension IPM activities will include training students, participating in Extension training, producing guides, developing and delivering materials, assisting in maintaining up-to-date IPM-related EDIS publications, serving as a point of contact for clientele, and providing IPM and biological control consultation. There were 417 email consultation contacts in 2017. The UF/IFAS IPM Coordinator will participate as a member of SERA IEG-003 (Southern Region IPM Coordinators), and submit the required USDA REEports. He will coordinate development of IPM grant proposals in cooperation with UF/IFAS research and Extension faculty members and serve as the Florida contact for the Regional Information Network (RIN). The primary function of the RIN is to address regulatory decisions regarding IPM, most often involving pesticide registrations. The IPM Coordinator will continue to advance the UF/IFAS IPM program, especially funding, staffing, and collaboration. He endeavors to institutionalize the IPM approach to solving pest problems, rather than perpetuating reliance primarily on pesticides, i.e., not trying something else only after pesticides are considered not effective or affordable. It is expected that the UF/IFAS IPM program will serve as a model for cooperation between state IPM specialists and county Extension faculty. Statewide consultation and technical support in IPM and biological control will be provided continuously. For Housing and Residential Environments Housing: In the second year of our project, we will recruit county Extension faculty from two additional counties, provide in-service training to new and existing agents, support on-site county program development, collect evaluation data, and begin a six month follow up subsample of clientele attitudes and IPM implementation. We will complete the basic recommendations and begin video segments that support homeowner IPM training. Material will be posted at UF/IFAS and eXtension urban CoP sites. We will submit an invited article to the Journal of IPM based on our housing IPM session at the 9th International IPM Symposium. For Plant Pest and Disease Diagnostic System: The Florida Collaborative Plant Pest and Disease Diagnostic System will be improved further by implementing plans to strategically update the Florida First Detector website (http://www.flfirstdetector.org/ ). Increasingly, the Florida First Detector website will be used as a portal to direct First Detectors to diagnostic resources in Florida, including the plant pathology and entomology diagnostic clinics, DDIS (Distance Diagnostic and Identification System), and partnering external diagnostic resources at the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry (FDACS-DPI). We will increase the number of blog posts per week and expand the county Extension faculty audience. Additional real-time information relevant to current plant pest pressure in Florida will be provided by the Extension plant clinics. For IPM for Cotton Cultivars in North Florida: Documentation of the population dynamics of key pests associated with cotton will continue with year-round trapping and field sampling in experimental and commercial cotton fields in the ecological transition zone between temperate and subtropical climates and exists in North Florida. The project will generate specific information on cotton cultivation and provide IPM recommendations for producers in the Florida Panhandle region that will be disseminated through presentations at technical meetings. The development of a downloadable app for mobile devices describing the prevalent pests and natural enemies associated with cotton in the Florida Panhandle will be initiated in the second year of the project. For Pollinator Plants and Pollinator Health: The pollinator plant database website will continue to be enhanced with additional plants and associated pollinators. We will continue to promote this pollinator plant database website (https://protectingbees.njaes.rutgers.edu/find-plants/) and tabulate website visits and usage. The "Pollinators of Florida" app will be mined for additional data to add to the database website. This app will be promoted to clientele as a citizen scientist project to assist with data collection. Additional resources will be developed as part of the curriculum to train citizen scientists. The curriculum will be implemented via statewide workshops.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? Subproject: IPM Coordination for the University of Florida 1. Support and encourage Extension faculty in conducting IPM projects. We cooperatively developed the 2017 CPPM, EIP project including four new subprojects with considerable county Extension collaboration. The IPM coordinator assisted cooperators in writing grant proposals, new Hatch projects, IPM success stories, and joint publications (listed in Continuation Report). 2. Coordinate and report on the multi-disciplinary IPM projects. The IPM Coordinator chaired or served on national, regional and state committees involved in pest management, e.g. International Organization for Biological Control, Mass Rearing and Quality Assurance Working Group past convener, the FAMU Center for Biological Control Advisory Council chair, an ANBP- Liaison to the Board of Directors, on the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, DPI Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey Advisory Committee, on the Doctor of Plant Medicine Program, Internal Advisory Committee, on several committees of the International IPM Symposium, on the FAMU College of Agriculture and Food Sciences Advisory Board and Advisory Council of the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences, and on the Sysco Sustainable/IPM Program Advisory Council. IPM consultation was provided continuously. 3. Assist county-level IPM activities and collaborative workgroups. The IPM Coordinator was appointed to a UF/IFAS Extension Horticulture Green Team Pesticide Recommendation Task Force to determine the best and most efficient ways to effectively assist clients regarding pesticide recommendations and to provide much needed new resources to county Extension agents to fill information gaps. Additionally, guidance was contributed on UF/IFAS diagnostic services and also on pest identification and cultural practices that help to prevent pest infestations, mechanical and biological control, and chemical control as part of a systematic approach to avoiding or managing pests and diseases. Subproject: Housing and Residential Environments Housing 1. Diversify IPM messengers who will incorporate IPM into existing housing programs. We completed our first in-service training on IPM through UF/IFAS Extension's on-site Pest Management University, January 29-30, 2018, that included county faculty from Citrus, Escambia, Holmes, Jefferson, Seminole, Suwanee, Volusia, and Washington counties. We also made final edits to the evaluation tool for agent in-servicing and the evaluation tool to be administered after they deliver the IPM module through their programs. 2. Develop and deliver materials and tools needed to increase residential IPM. We drafted IPM documents on bats, bed bugs, birds, filth flies, fire ants, German cockroaches, head lice, rodents, ticks, stinging insects (wasps, yellow jackets, bees), and tramp ants that have been sent to colleagues (external and Non-Traditional IPM Change Agents, Non-traditional IPM change agent team) for review. German cockroach guidance was published in December 2017. Subproject: Plant Pest and Disease Diagnostic System 1. Revitalize the Florida Plant Diagnostic Network (FPDN). Collaboration with Master Gardeners at plant clinics was enhanced with photography-based diagnosis. A training session was conducted in May 2018 with Sumter County Master Gardeners. In addition to photography-based training, participants were taught basic entomology skills. 2. Expand partnerships and involvement in the UF/IFAS Pest Alert listserv. Graduate students enrolled in the UF Doctor of Plant Medicine (DPM) program have been updating the UF/IFAS Pest Alert website on a routine basis as of January 2018 under the supervision of the DPM Director. Facilitating a routine and consistent blog presence has been key for initial revitalization of the blog posts. Subproject: IPM for Cotton Cultivars in North Florida 1. Establish a sentinel cotton plot at West Florida Research and Education Center (WFREC) following agronomic practices of the Florida panhandle. Varieties of cotton cultivated in the Florida Panhandle have been selected to be included in sentinel cotton plots at the West Florida Research and Education Center in the 2018 crop season. 2. Evaluate the occurrence and abundance of the pests and beneficial insects in the WREC plot and commercial cotton fields. The pest insects in experimental areas at WFREC and in commercial cotton fields in the region have been identified. The population dynamics of cotton bollworm, soybean looper and fall armyworm have been documented by year-round pheromone trapping. Since August 2017, experimental areas at WFREC and cotton commercial fields have been sampled with beat cloth, plant inspection and sweep net to determine the occurrence of pests and natural enemies. 3. Produce and disseminate management guidelines, and train cotton producer's and agricultural professionals to identify cotton pests and natural enemies. In the first year of the project, an initial survey was designed to gather baseline data on the current knowledge of producers from the Florida Panhandle to recognize species of pests and beneficial insects associated with cotton fields, and the abundance of these pests throughout the cropping season. The survey was conducted during crop field days. Informative material related to pests and Bt technology in cotton was produce and disseminated via presentations and hands-on exercises with farmers and agricultural professionals at Extension meetings. Subproject: Pollinator Plants and Pollinator Health 1. Expand the Ecological Plant Database by adding vetted pollinator plants. The searchable database website was expanded and enhanced by adding vetted pollinator plants searchable by pollinator, season, hardiness zone (8-11), plant species, plant type and other plant characteristics. Collaboration was established with the USDA, NIFA, SCRI project (Grant 2016-51181-25399) titled "Protecting Pollinators with Economically Feasible and Environmentally Sound Ornamental Horticulture." 2. Develop and deliver training in identifying plants, plant parts and arthropods (combined with Objective 3). We developed a train-the-trainer workshop curriculum and conducted a citizen science project to provide training in submitting pollinator plants. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission (FFWC) already hosts a "Pollinators of Florida" project on the iNaturalist app website. We will collaborate with FFWC to use "Pollinators of Florida" as part of our grant's objective of developing a training program for citizen scientists to contribute information on plants being used by pollinators.

Publications

  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: Kaur, G., J. Guo1, Y. Niu, S. Brown, G. P. Head, P. A. Price, S. P. Moraes, X. Ni, and F. Huang. 2018. Susceptibility of corn earworm populations from southeastern United States to Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab2 proteins. ESA-Southeastern Branch Meeting, Orlando, FL.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: Leppla, N. C., A. C. Hodges, M. G. Pinkerton, and S. M. Thompson. 2018. The crop protection community increasingly includes practitioners and scientists who effectively manage pests for agricultural producers. The New IPM: Where is Crop Protection Taking Us? 2018 International IPM symposium, Baltimore, MD.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: Owens, D. R. and N. C. Leppla (co-organizers). 2018. Maintaining IPM integrity with invasive insects. 2018 International IPM symposium, Baltimore, MD.
  • Type: Other Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: Oi, F. M. 2018. Building capacity in extension and the pest control industry. Symposium: IPM in Housing: A Round Table to Discussion on Diversifying the Messenger. 2018 International IPM symposium, Baltimore, MD.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: Paula-Moraes, S.V. 2018. IPM and IRM in field crops in a scenario of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea. In symposium section: Managing the former allopatric Helicoverpa zea and H. armigera in the Americas: Experience and challenges going forward. 9th International IPM Symposium, Baltimore, MD.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: Preston, S. 2018. "Diversifying the IPM messenger: combining finance and mortgage training with IPM." A Round Table to Discussion on Diversifying the Messenger. 2018 International IPM symposium, Baltimore, MD.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: Ratcliffe, S. T. M. Baur, B. J. Beckie, L. J. Giesler, N. C. Leppla, and J. Schroeder (presented by N. C. Leppla). 2018. Crop protection contributions toward agricultural productivity. Integrating New Technology to Meet the Future Challenges of Agriculture: A Sharing of Experiences, Northeastern Plant, Pest, and Soils Conference. Philadelphia, PA.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: Thompson, S., M. Pinkerton, A. C. Hodges, and N. C. Leppla. 2018. Florida First Detector: teaching invasive species monitoring and identification to public audiences. Landscape Ornamental IPM Workshop, Gainesville, FL.
  • Type: Other Status: Other Year Published: 2017 Citation: Paula-Moraes, S.V. 2017. Corn earworm and fall armyworm in Florida Panhandle: what you need to know. Corn Variety Field Day, Jay, FL.
  • Type: Other Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: Paula-Moraes, S.V. 2018. Identifying and timing control of Lepidoptera species to reduce pesticide applications. Farm Day, farmers did an exercise to identify and categorize the economic importance of different insect pests in the region of the Florida Panhandle, Atmore, AL.
  • Type: Other Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: Paula-Moraes, S.V. 2018. Caterpillars in crops. Row Crop Short Course, I surveyed farmers about the phenology of occurrence of pests during the cotton crop season and recognition of the Bt technologies available to manage caterpillars, Marianna, FL.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Leppla, N. C., M. W. Johnson, J. L. Merritt, and F. G. Zalom. 2017. Applications and Trends in Commercial Biological Control for Arthropod Pests of Tomato, pp. 283-298. In: W. Wakil, G. Brust, and T. Perring (Eds.), Sustainable Management of Arthropod Pests of Tomato, Elsevier 372 p.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Leppla, N. C., K. L. Johnson II, K. J. Juneau, J. L. Merritt, C. R. Kerr and Y. C. Newman. 2017. Pest and beneficial arthropods in a Tifton 85 Bermudagrass field in North Central Florida. Florida Entomologist. 100: 680-683.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Penca, C. J., A. C. Hodges, L. L. Davis, N. C. Leppla, and R. C. Hochmuth. 2017. Abundance and diversity of beneficial and pest arthropods in buckwheat on blueberry and vegetable farms in north Florida. Florida Entomologist. 100: 186-189.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Reisig, D., A. S. Huseth, J. S. Bachelor, A. A. Mohammad-Amir, L. Braswell, H. J. Burrack, K. Flanders, J. K. Greene, D. A. Hebert, A. Jacobson, S. V. Paula-Moraes, P. Roberts, and S. V. Taylor. 2018. Long-term empirical and observational evidence of practical Helicoverpa zea resistance to cotton with pyramided Bt toxins. J. Economic Entomology. p.1-10. doi: 10.1093/jee/toy106.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Fraisse, C. W., and S.V. Paula-Moraes. 2018. Degree-days: growing, heating, and cooling. UF/IFAS, EDIS, ABE381.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Funderburk, J. E., N. A. Casuso, N. C. Leppla, and M. C. Donahoe. 2017. Insect and mite integrated pest management in Florida cotton. UF/IFAS, EDIS, ENY-886. 14 p.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Hallberg, R., N. C. Leppla, and R. C. Hochmuth. 2017. University of Florida study helps farmers find best fields for sweet potatoes. IPM in the South (April), Southern IPM Center. 2 p
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Kerr C. R., N. C. Leppla, E. A. Rohrig, G. Lotz, R. J. Stuart, and T. R. Smith. 2017. Mass-rearing Tamarixia radiata standard operating procedures. Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry, Bureau of Methods Development and Biological Control. Technical Manual No. 1. 41 p.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Oi, F., E. N. I. Weeks, J. Jonovich, and D. Miller. Assessment-based pest management of german cockroaches. EDIS ENY-989. (http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1190)
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: Baldwin, J., S. P. Moraes, L. Ledbetter-Kish, and R. Pereira. 2018. Red fire ants in fields crops of Florida Panhandle. ESA-Southeastern Branch Meeting, Orlando, FL.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: Gannon, A., and N. C. Leppla. 2018. Trap crops for attracting the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), and its natural enemies. Biocontrol in the Southeast: from Weeds to Arthropod Pests, S-1058 Symposium at ESA-SEB conference, Orlando, FL.