Source: NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY submitted to
DELIVERING IPM EDUCATION AND OUTREACH TO NEW MEXICO`S COMMUNITIES
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
EXTENDED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
1013838
Grant No.
2017-70006-27189
Project No.
NMBennett-17G
Proposal No.
2017-04411
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
EIP
Project Start Date
Sep 1, 2017
Project End Date
Aug 31, 2020
Grant Year
2019
Project Director
Thompson, M.
Recipient Organization
NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY
1620 STANDLEY DR ACADEMIC RESH A RM 110
LAS CRUCES,NM 88003-1239
Performing Department
Ag Science Center Los Lunas
Non Technical Summary
Due to the fact 77% of the population in New Mexico lives in a city center, the overall goal of this EIP proposal is to focus IPM education and outreach on a previously underserved group of urban stakeholders. NMSU will continue to meet the needs of a diversifying agricultural market while extending programing to a growing urban population through the community, pollinator health, and recreation lands program priorities. Specific objectives will focus on providing IPM education and outreach to stakeholders targeted in each priority, facilitating effective communication among project collaborators, and addressing stakeholder driven applied research needs. Our proposal directly aligns with the national IPM roadmap and CPPM goals including: 1) IPM for natural resources and recreational environments, 2) diversified IPM systems, and 3) IPM for sustainable communities. To address the IPM needs across the state, New Mexico plans to implement field-based activities such as workshops, lectures, field days, pest walks, extension publications, and applied research demonstrating IPM tactics with the goal of increasing IPM awareness and adoption among our stakeholders.The EIP program primary and secondary priorities for New Mexico include:1. Primary priority, IPM in Communities2. Primary priority, IPM in Pollinator Health3. Secondary priority, IPM on Recreational Lands4. Secondary priority, IPM Partnership in Wide-Area Pest Monitoring5. Secondary priority, IPM Support for Pest Diagnostic Facilities
Animal Health Component
0%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
100%
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
21605301130100%
Goals / Objectives
The major goal for the IPM program in New Mexico is to increase IPM awareness and implementation in urban communities, recreational lands, and encourage integrated pest management as well as habitat conservation to protect pollinators. The IPM program at New Mexico state aims to incorporate and respond to stakeholder needs through educational opportunities and applied research that advances IPM practices in our state. The objectives used to achieve the goals set for New Mexico State's EIP project are listed below for each primary and secondary priority.1. Primary Priority: IPM Implementation in CommunitiesEducational and research objectives for the IPM implementation in communities include: 1) improving pest and beneficial insect identification, 2) expanding strategies for organic pest control, 3) gardening for beneficial insects, 4) increasing monitoring for garden and landscape pests, and 5) applied research that demonstrates the importance of flower area and flower diversity in augmenting beneficial insects.2. Primary Priority: IPM for Pollinator HealthEducational and research objectives for IPM for pollinator health include: 1) increasing awareness of native pollinators, 2) expanding habitat installations for pollinators, 3) increasing implementation of IPM strategies for managed bees, 4) establishing best management practices for pollinator conservation in urban landscapes and small farms, and 5) research that develops native flower mixes for attracting native pollinators.3. Secondary Priority: IPM for Recreational LandsEducational and outreach objectives for IPM on Recreational Lands include: 1) improving training on IPM for recreational lands, 2) more training on tree and pest identification, and 3) identifying better monitoring strategies for early pest detection.4. Secondary Priority: IPM Partnerships in Wide-Area Monitoring and Reporting SystemsThe objective of initiating wide-area monitoring in NM is to encourage the adoption of IPM in urban landscapes through increased pest and beneficial insect monitoring. Wide-area monitoring will initiate monitoring of beneficial and pest insects important to IPM programs in urban landscapes including: bumble bees, syrphid flies, coccinellid beetles, and grasshoppers. An important objective of this priority is recruiting Master Gardener volunteers to assist in data collection.5. Secondary Priority: IPM support for Pest Diagnostic FacilitiesNMSU offers pest diagnostic services to the residents of NM in the areas of plant diseases, weeds, and insects. The goals of our pest diagnostic facility include: 1) accurate sample identification and timely reporting back to clientele and 2) increased diagnostic capabilities for the agricultural science centers.
Project Methods
1. Primary Priority: IPM Implementation in CommunitiesEfforts for Community IPM: Educational opportunities through guides, trainings, and workshops. NMSU Extension provides a significant amount of in-person IPM training through lectures, Master Gardener trainings, workshops, field days, and site visits. Extension guides, factsheets, hands-on displays, and on-line media are passive sources of educational IPM material that will supplement in-person training.Curriculum development for advanced IPM training. Our second effort is to develop advanced IPM curriculum for veteran Master Gardeners. Topics will cover IPM for weeds, organic insect pest suppression, and plant care and selection for disease management.Developing on-line Master Gardener training. Our third effort within the community IPM priority is to build on-line training programs for the Master Gardener Program enabling NMSU to research a wider audience.IPM education through demonstrations and research. Our fourth effort within the community IPM priority is to establish a display garden as well as conduct research that demonstrates and encourages the adoption of IPM practices to stakeholders.Methods for evaluating Efforts: Program activities will be evaluated with a formal survey, informally through post-training evaluations, and through identification quizzes administered before and after garden walks. Indicators of success will include increased awareness and understanding of IPM concepts related to community IPM, increased use of IPM practices, reduced use of chemical controls, and increases in floral resource plantings.Methods and Analysis for Applied Research: Flower area and diversity will be manipulated using containers in residential landscapes. Five treatments will be tested: 1) low flower area + low diversity, 2) high flower area + low diversity, 3) low flower area + high diversity, 4) high flower area + high diversity, and 5) a control no flowers added. Timed collections using hand-held vacuums will be collected immediately after and prior to the removal of containers. Data on beneficial insect abundance and diversity will be analyzed using ANVOA.2. Primary Priority: IPM for Pollinator HealthEfforts for Pollinator IPM:Educational opportunities through guides, trainings, and workshops. Activities within IPM for Pollinator Health will include 8 presentations a year on the topic of NM pollinators and their conservation. A lecture series in partnership with the ABQ Botanic Gardens will support spring and fall presentations on topics related to pollinator conservation and IPM. Pollinator walks will be initiated at local botanic gardens (Santa Fe and Albuquerque) to provide stakeholders with the opportunity to learn pollinator identification. Each year of this grant, one pollinator workshop will be offered.Educational opportunities through demonstrations. Habitat installations coupled with educational signs are effective teaching tools, offering examples of IPM implementation to stakeholders. Pollinator habitat will be installed at the ABQ Botanic Gardens urban farm, a community garden in Las Cruces, and the display garden at Los Lunas. Educational signs will accompany the pollinator plantings at garden locations educating visitors on pollinator IPM.Methods for evaluating Efforts: Activities within IPM for Pollinator Health will be evaluated with a formal survey, informally through post-training evaluations, and attendance at events. Indicators of success will include increased awareness and understanding of IPM concepts related to IPM for pollinators, increased use of IPM practices to protect pollinators, reduced use of chemical controls, and increases in pollinator habitat.Methods and Analysis for Applied Research: A demonstration research plot will be established at the Los Lunas Science Center to address stakeholder questions regarding ideal planting combinations for pollinators and other beneficial insects. The objective of this applied research is to develop and evaluate three flower mixes that are designed to attract different groups of beneficial insects. The three mixes will include: 1) a bumble bee mix, 2) a solitary bee mix, and 3) a natural enemy mix. Demonstration plots will be a RCBD design with 5 replications for each mix. Study plots will be sampled twice a month June-September using a vacuum sampler. NMDS (non-metric multi-dimensional scaling) will be used to analyze differences in community composition across mixes.3. Secondary Priority: IPM for Recreational LandsEfforts for Recreational Lands:Educational opportunities through guides, trainings, and workshops. Park and open space managers indicated poor tree identification skills as an impediment to effective monitoring and pest diagnosis. Each year of this grant, a tree identification walk will be supported. To encourage the use of trees and shrubs that support beneficial insects throughout the growing season, a flowering phenology tree and shrub guide will be developed. Finally, a challenging invasive species that open space managers struggle to control is salt cedar. NMSU will support IPM training for this invasive species.Development of tree maps for IPM training purposes. Few green space managers have the tree identification skills needed to develop management plans for infested trees or implement species specific monitoring for targeted pests. To aid green space managers in tree and pest identification, we will develop tree maps at 3 locations across the state.Methods for evaluating Efforts: Activities within IPM on Recreational Lands will be evaluated with a formal survey, informally through post-training evaluations, tree identification quizzes before and after walking tours, and attendance at events. Indicators of success will include increased awareness and understanding of IPM concepts for recreational lands, increased use of IPM practices in parks and open spaces, improved tree diagnostic skills, reduced reliance on chemical controls in parks, and increases in tree diversity and habitat for beneficial insects.4. Secondary Priority: IPM Partnerships in Wide-Area Monitoring and Reporting SystemsEfforts for Wide-Area Monitoring: Educational opportunities through participatory research and workshops. EIP funding will support a beneficial and pest insect monitoring program in the Albuquerque and Santa Fe area. NMSU Extension will coordinate with the Master Gardener Program to identify volunteers interested in participating in the monitoring program and provide training workshops on insect identification and sampling protocols.Alerts and distributional maps showing insect abundances. Once data is collected and submitted through the iPiPE app or iPiPE portal, alerts and distributional maps for beneficial insects and pests will be available.Methods for evaluating Efforts:Surveys and program retention to evaluate impact. To measure the impact wide-area monitoring has on stakeholders, informal surveys of project participants will be conducted at the beginning and end of the monitoring program. Finally, volunteer retention in the program will be an additional indicator of program success.5. Secondary Priority: IPM support for Pest Diagnostic FacilitiesEfforts for Pest Diagnostics: Efforts for pest diagnostics include: 1) sample identification and reporting back to clientele and 2) increased diagnostic capabilities for the agricultural science centers.Methods for evaluating Efforts: The success of the pest diagnostic program will be evaluated based on a growing capacity to perform diagnoses each year, and the feedback received from clients.

Progress 09/01/19 to 08/31/20

Outputs
Target Audience:The target stakeholder groups included: homeowners, growers, native plant and honey bee organizations, K-12 students,Master Gardeners, staff for municipal parks & other recreational lands. Changes/Problems:The COVID-19 pandemic has interrupted and slowed progress on multiple project goals and objectives. However, we are continuing to adapt our programs to socially distanced formats, such as video resources, social media posts, and webinars so that our New Mexico stakeholders receive important education on best management practices and foundations of IPM and pollinator health and adopt IPM practices in commercial, small-scale farm, and home plantings of grapes, What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided? Nothing Reported How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?Results have been disseminated to communities of interest via educational IPM signage, workshops and events in the NMSU Agricultural Science Center at Los Lunas Learning Garden and across the state (both in-person and remote/video presentations), pest & beneficial insect identification trainings, development of informative Extension guide publications, lecture series, Extension Master Gardener classes, and publication of 2 chapters contributed to the Valle de Oro Backyard Refuge Guide. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?IPM Implementation in Communities Objectives · IPM Education - 20 in-person (or live-stream) IPM educational events; presented by NMSU specialists covering horticulture, viticulture, plant pathology, weed management, entomology, forestry, etc. Stakeholders have been increasingly requesting IPM education across the state. A focus will be placed on reaching counties and groups that were underrepresented in previous trainings. - 5 trainings will be converted into a digital open-access format meeting accessibility standards. Proposed topics: Garden Management, Urban Tree Care, Orchard Pests, Pollinators, Beneficial Insects. Presented through "Read...Set...Grow!" YouTube Series. · Demonstration Garden - 12 public events to be held the NMSU Los Lunas Ag. Science Center Learning Garden. This demonstration garden has become a hands-on learning hub for many educational events, including workshops and field days. Stakeholders, including small farmers, extension educations, Master Gardeners, non-profit organizations, and K-12 students, regularly utilize the garden space as an outdoor classroom and meeting space. · Development of Educational Guides - IPM for Fruit and Nut Pests · Research - Mulch Study. - Vegetable Shade Cover Study IPM Implementation in Specialty Crops: Grapes Objectives · IPM Education for Vineyards - In-person site visits (as allowed under COVID19 protocol) and/or electronic communication with individual grape growers and prospective grape growers - 3-6 Workshop/presentations: "Effective vineyard water use" and "Insect and disease identification, monitoring, and management" · Research - Vineyard Ground Cover (FY2019 - Ongoing) - Complete nematode manuscripts: refereed and extension (one each) - Water use and monitoring in Vineyards (FY2019 - Ongoing) - Completion of Red Blotch Virus drone monitoring IPM for Pollinator Health Objectives · IPM Education - 5 in-person (or livestream) pollinator educational events - Managed Pollinator Workshop - Beginning Beekeeping · Lecture Series II - 2 additional speakers (Spring and Summer 2021). We have had positive feedback about having visiting speakers, and we will continue this series. If traveling is not allowed due to COVID19, a multi-speaker webinar series will be created. · Development of Educational Guides - IPM for Pollinator Conservation - IPM for Managed Pollinators - Landscape Design and Urban Pollinators · Research - Managed Pollinator Beehive Trial - Managed pollinators (honeybees) are popular in urban, peri-urban, and agriculture stakeholders. Many types of novel bee hives have risen in popularity in recent years. A trial testing beehive type (standard frame boxes, top-bar hives, novel design hives, etc.) will be conducted. Trial set to begin Spring 2020; delayed due to COVID19. Because extreme summer temperatures in New Mexico are not suitable for establishing hives, first-year trials will begin April 2021. IPM on Recreational Lands Objectives · IPM Education - 3 videos for tree pest identification. Presented through "Ready...Set...Grow!" YouTube Series. · Development of Educational Guides - Unmanned Arial Vehicle (UAV) for Tree Pest Survey

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? 1. IPM Implementation in Communities Goal: Educate New Mexico stakeholders on best management practices and foundations of IPM. Objectives · IPM Education - >100 in-person trainings with IPM-related content were given across the state to for various stakeholders given by NMSU Extension Specialists - Educational IPM signage - delayed due to COVID19, expected completion Aug. 2020 - Santa Fe-Topic: What is IPM? · Demonstration Gardens - Installation of beneficial insect habitat Santa Fe Park - delayed due to COVID19, expected completion Aug. 2020 · Pest & Beneficial Insect Identification Trainings - 10 Garden Walks · Development of Educational Guide - "Common Garden Pests of New Mexico and IPM Strategies" - in press, release Aug. 2020 - Content includes a thorough explanation of IPM, descriptions of the 15 topmost common garden insect pests in New Mexico, and a glossary ~25 pages. · Research - Ornamental Bulbs for Pollinators (FY2018-FY2020) - Data analysis in progress, factsheet to be released Fall 2020. - Mulch Study (established Fall FY2019-ongoing) - Investigation of the impact of different mulches on sapling and soil health by measuring soil-moisture and above and below-ground temperatures; tree growth and development; weed and insect pest management - Year 1 data collection to be completed by Aug. 2020 Outcomes Improved stakeholder recognition of pest and beneficial insects Increased knowledge among homeowners regarding IPM strategies Increased use of IPM strategies among urban stakeholders Reduction in chemical use Increased habitat installed for beneficial insects 2. IPM Implementation in Specialty Crops: Grapes (initiated FY2018) Goal: Encourage adoption of IPM practices in commercial, small-scale farms, and home plantings of Grapes. Objectives · Viticulture IPM Education - 12 educational workshops and presentations at varied commercial grape grower stakeholder meetings, pesticide applicator and master gardener trainings, and small grower workshops - Produce a minimum of one YouTube video on vine water status monitoring for efficient water use in New Mexico vineyards - Produce a "New Mexico Vineyard Water Use" factsheet · Lecture Series in partnership with Albuquerque Bio-park Botanic Garden. - 6 public lectures on grape production and IPM therein · IPM for Vineyards Guide, expected in early 2021 · Research - Vineyard Ground Cover (FY2019- Ongoing) - Soil health and eco-service impacts of vineyard ground covers. - Nematode Survey and Characterization (FY2018-FY2020) - Data collection complete and analyses to correlate beneficial and destructive nematode occurrence and distribution with various soil parameters, on-going with expected journal manuscript submission in 2020 - 2 Oral poster presentations: Society of Nematologists Annual Meeting (2018, 2019), - Results presented at New Mexico grape grower conferences in 2019, 2020 - Extension publication: "Occurrence and Distribution of Nematodes in New Mexico Vineyards", to be submitted 2020 - Water Use and Monitoring in Vineyards (FY2019-FY2020) - Collaborative effort with the Pueblo of Santa Ana, Sandoval County, NM to characterize the amount of water used by various V. vinifera varieties intended for sparkling wine production. - 1 Oral poster presentation: 64th Annual New Mexico Water Conference - 1 Presentation to conservation group: Estacado Resource, Conservation & Development Council, 11th Annual Northeastern New Mexico - 1 Grower, workshop/training on effective vineyard water use in 2020 - 1 Undergraduate student internship completed in partnership with Universidad Tecnológica De Paquimé, Chihuahua, Mexico · New IPM Technologies: Drone Mapping of Red Blotch Virus occurrence - Drone mapping for identification of Red Blotch Virus and incorporation of IPM strategies, Year 1 data completed and undergoing analysis. Year 2 (2020) -pending COVID19 state regulatory changes, documentation and verification of red blotch occurrence via PCR with correlation to drone-captured images of affected vines/vine blocks - Expected, technical/research note journal submission of: "Documented Occurrence Red Blotch Virus in New Mexico" in partnership with NMSU plant diagnostic lab Outcomes Adoption of IPM strategies for management of leafhoppers and other insects in commercial, small-scale farm, and home grape plantings Improved insect, nematode, and disease recognition and monitoring by grape grower stakeholders Improved awareness of the importance of soil health in vineyard in regards to its impact on occurrence of nematodes Increased awareness of grapevine water use monitoring and calculation of appropriate irrigation water to apply at various growth stages throughout the growing season Increased awareness of virus symptoms and effective monitoring thereof by commercial grape growers Increased beneficial insect habitat support among grape growers 3. IPM for Pollinator Health Goal: Educate New Mexico stakeholders on best practices for supporting Pollinator Health Objectives · IPM Education - 10 pollinator centric in-person lectures to stakeholder groups - 15 extension displays across the state at extension meetings, field days, educational events, community events. - 2 multi-part workshops: Sandoval County (4-part series), Online state-wide w/ Xerces Society (5-part series) (scheduled for July 2020) - Interpretive IPM signage in public spaces: Los Lunas Agriculture Science Center Learning Garden, Albuquerque BioPark Botanical Garden (scheduled for April 2020; delayed due to COVID19) · Lecture Series - 4 public lectures on pollinator health were held in collaboration with the Albuquerque BioPark with speakers who are leaders in pollinator research and extension from across the country. · Pollinators Identification Trainings - 5 Trainings Completed: 2 in Albuquerque, 1 in Santa Fe, 1 in Los Lunas w/ Xerces Society, 1 in Truth or Consequences · Development of Educational Guides - 2 chapters contributed to Valle de Oro Backyard Refuge Guide - Native Plants for Pollinators (expected completion Fall 2020) - Plant Mixes for Beneficial Insects (expected completion Fall 2020) · Research - Native Plant Mixes Plot (FY2017-FY2020) - Data collection complete; analysis and publication forthcoming Outcomes Improved public recognition of and increased habitat for native pollinators Increased knowledge among stakeholders regarding IPM for pollinator habitat Increased use of IPM strategies among beekeepers Reduction in chemical use in managed hives 4. IPM on Recreational Lands Goal: Educate New Mexico stakeholders on greenspace and recreational IPM management Objectives · Development of Educational Guides - IPM Strategies for Insect Pests of Trees - Trees and Shrubs for Beneficial Insects in Central New Mexico (in review, expected release Aug. 2020) · Tree Mapping (expected completion Aug. 2020) - 3 Map and tree guides for stakeholder education. - City of Las Cruces "Young Park Walking Tour" (completed 2019; Access https://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_h/H429.pdf) - New Mexico Junior College in Hobbs "Trees and Shrubs Walking Tour (expected completion Aug. 2020) - St Johns College in Santa Fe "Trees and Shrubs Walking Tour" (expected completion Aug. 2020) · New IPM Technologies: Drone Survey Mapping - Drone mapping for the incorporation of IPM strategies, Year 1 data completed and undergoing analysis. Year 2 (2020) -pending COVID19 state regulatory changes Outcomes Improved recognition of tree species in NM public parks Increased adoption of new monitoring strategies Increased adoption of IPM tactics in parks Incorporation of high species diversity-supporting beneficial insects

Publications

  • Type: Other Status: Under Review Year Published: 2020 Citation: Common Garden Pests of New Mexico and IPM Strategies
  • Type: Other Status: Under Review Year Published: 2020 Citation: "Trees and Shrubs for Beneficial Insects in Central New Mexico"


Progress 09/01/18 to 08/31/19

Outputs
Target Audience:The target stakeholder groups included: homeowners, growers, native plant and honey bee organizations, K-12 students, Master Gardeners, staff for municipal parks & other recreational lands. Changes/Problems:The overall goal of the EIP priorities has not changed: to increase awareness and adoption of IPM practices with urban stakeholders. Nor have the specific objectives changed and will focus on providing IPM education to the stakeholders targeted in each priority, facilitating effective communication with project collaborators, and addressing stakeholder driven research needs. The changes maintain the original proposal focus areas as highlighted in the IPM Road Map and the CPPM program: 1) IPM for natural resources and recreational environments, 2) diversified IPM systems, and 3) IPM for sustainable communities. Original program priorities: Primary Priorities 1) IPM Implementation in Communities - see changes below 2) IPM for Pollinator Health - no change Secondary Priorities 1) IPM on Recreational Lands - no change 2) IPM Partnerships in Wide-Area Pest Monitoring and Reporting System - see changes below 3) IPM support for Pest Diagnostic Facilities - see changes below Proposed Changes with Explanation: Primary Priority Changes: IPM Implementation for Communities - The research component has been altered. Preliminary results from Year One of the flower crate study showed that there was little to no difference in the diversity and abundance of beneficial insects between the treatments; therefore, due to the complexity of deploying the crates to the study sites along with the timing of flowering for the different species used, we have decided that changing this study is a better use of our resources. Scope: The scope of this priority has not changed. Description of New Activities: Ornamental Bulbs as Early Season Resources for Pollinators: peer-reviewed research report, Extension publication, demonstration workshops, educational programs on beneficial insect habitat enhancements. Although not native to the Southwest region, early-blooming ornamental bulbs may provide nectar, pollen, habitat, or a combination of these resources to beneficial insects and thereby increase their population levels in urban and rural landscapes. This project is located within the Demonstration Garden that was established in Year 1 under this Primary Priority. Mulch Study & Demonstration Plots (to start in FY 2019): peer-reviewed research report, Extension publication, demonstration workshops, educational programs directed at homeowners, landscapers, and urban developers. In our semi-arid climate, soils are exposed to extreme temperatures, minimal precipitation, and high winds. Protecting those soils is imperative to maintain soil and plant health. For this study, we are investigating the impact of different mulch treatments on soil health by measuring soil-moisture and above and below-ground temperatures. Encouraging cultural practices that improve soil health and water retention is imperative to maintaining healthy plants which in turn minimizes pest populations. In other regions, research has confirmed benefits of fibrous, woody mulch on IPM-related horticultural issues (e.g., control of weedy species, and improving soil health by encouraging beneficial insects and microbes), but this work has not been done on the landscape scale in New Mexico soils. This work will also take place within the Demonstration Garden that was established in Year 1 under this Primary Priority NEW Primary Priority Initiated: 3) IPM Implementation in Specialty Crops: Grapes - Justification for Primary Priority Initiated: Monitoring of pests and efficacious resource use are critical to successful implementation of IPM in specialty crops. Although New Mexico's commercial winegrape plantings only occupy approximately 1,500 acres, the state's wine production and consumption generates substantial tax revenue. Table grapes for fresh consumption are a viable small-scale commercial crop and home garden plantings occur throughout New Mexico. Insect pests, nematodes, fungal diseases, scarcity of irrigation water, and sodic/saline soils reduce yield and quality and increase production costs of this specialty crop. Monitoring of insect pests and diseases, recognition and amelioration of unsuitable edaphic conditions and accurate estimation water stress and monitoring of water application rates can improve natural pest suppression, increase eco-services offered by perennial vineyard plantings and minimize use of synthetic pesticides and fertilizers as well as irrigation water within sustainable production schemes. The goal of grape IPM in NM is to encourage adoption in commercial, small-scale farm and home plantings via insect, nematode and disease monitoring, soil health awareness and improvement with ground covers and rootstocks, investigation of increased eco-services with pollinator beneficial insect habitat support and irrigation monitoring. Program activities for this priority include: 1) nematode survey results/manuscript publication and distribution via peer-reviewed journal (Journal of Nematology), extension bulletin(s), industry newsletter and workshops 2) soil health and eco-service impacts of vineyard ground covers with educational opportunities for workshops and presentations at academic, grower and master gardener meetings 3) water use monitoring at collaborating vineyards statewide with individual site visits to explain water conservation, irrigation efficiency and applied grapevine water use. Secondary Priorities Eliminated: 2) IPM Partnerships in Wide-Area Pest Monitoring and Reporting Systems - Separate funding was successfully procured in the form of a NIFA Integrated Platform for Extension and Education (IPIPE) grant. The original goals and objectives of this project were adopted under the iPIPE funding. 3) IPM Support for Pest Diagnostic Facilities - Equipment and program materials were purchased and remaining funds could be allocated to other project priorities. What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?Program Specialist Miranda Kersten acheived drone licensure. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?Various workshops, presentations, social media posts, an Extension guide publication, informational booths at community events (see above for details). What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?IPM Implementation in Communities (original priority) Expected Outcomes/Impacts: 1) Improve stakeholder recognition of pest and beneficial insects 2) Increase knowledge among homeowners regarding IPM strategies 3) Increase use of IPM strategies among urban stakeholders 4) Reduction in chemical use 5) Increased habitat installed for beneficial insects Objectives/Activities: ? Finish, publish, and distribute the new extension guide "Common Garden Pests of New Mexico and IPM Strategies" ? Curriculum development of Weed IPM education and guide ? Install beneficial insect habitat in Santa Fe Park ? Develop and install educational IPM signage in Santa Fe - Topic: What is IPM? ? IPM Trainings & Workshops - Presentations, workshops, and training activities with IPM-related content for various stakelholders by multiple NMSU Extension Specialists and IPM Program Specialists. • Offer frequent activities Learning Garden (established in Year 1 of this project), as well as in public gardens. • Design and install educational IPM displays in public gardens in Santa Fe, Albuquerque, Hobbs, and Las Cruces. • Research Continuation and Addition - Data collection and presentations • Ornamental Bulbs as Beneficial Insect Habitat Enhancement • Complete analysis of FY2018 data • Workshop activity to install FY2019 plant material in Fall 2019 • Newspaper column & extension publication on incorporation of ornamental bulbs in NM landscapes and urban IPM benefits • Mulch Study & Demonstration Plots (new research activity in FY 2019) Investigation of the impact of different mulches on soil health by measuring soil-moisture and above and below-ground temperatures. • Newspaper column on benefits of mulch in support of IPM goals to be published in-print across the state of New Mexico as well as online for broadcast using social media • Demonstration site at the Learning Garden IPM Implementation in Specialty Crops: Grapes (newly initiated priority in FY2018) Expected Outcomes/Impacts: 1) Encourage adoption of IPM strategies in commercial, small-scale farm, and home grape plantings 2) Increased insect, nematode, and disease monitoring by grape stakeholders 3) Improved awareness of the importance of soil health for IPM in vineyards 4) Increased beneficial insect habitat support among grape growers Objectives/Activities: Vineyard ground covers: • Soil health and eco-service impacts of vineyard ground covers with educational opportunities for workshops and presentations at varied stakeholder meetings. Funding to support salary for viticulture PhD student Ms. Jacquline Cormier. • Initial study presentation at Amer. Society of Horticultural Science, July 2019. • Results presentation at NM WSARE Sustainable Agriculture Conf. Summer 2019 • Soil carbon sequestration data collection • Track water use of various ground covers in vineyard setting Water use and monitoring: Collaborative effort with the Pueblo of Santa Ana, Bernalillo County, NM to characterize the amount of water used by various V. vinifera varieties intended for sparkling wine production. • Apply established crop coefficient (Kc) from other regions and calculate percentage of evapotranspiration required by each variety. • Collect weekly soil moisture and stem water potential data from a commercial vineyard with each of the study varieties. • Calculate consumptive water use of each variety to estimate total water requirement of each variety under environmental and edaphic conditions • Internship requirements of undergraduate Ms. Ludim Elda Quintana of Chihuahua Mexico will be fulfilled using award funding for salary. • Monitoring of insect pests and diseases by grape growers • Recognition and amelioration of unsuitable edaphic conditions and accurate estimation of water stress and monitoring of water application rates • Nematode survey results/manuscript publication and distribution via peerreviewed journal (Journal of Nematology) • Extension bulletin(s), Industry newsletter, manuscripts, and workshops • Workshops and presentations to educate growers on soil health and ecoservice impacts of vineyard ground covers • Water use monitoring at collaborating vineyards statewide with individual site visits to explain water conservation, irrigation efficiency and applied grapevine water use. IPM for Pollinator Health (original priority) Expected Outcomes/Impacts: 1) Improved public recognition of and increased habitat for native pollinators 2) Increased knowledge among stakeholders re: IPM for pollinator habitat 3) Increased use of IPM strategies among beekeepers 4) Reduction in chemical use in managed hives Objectives/Activities: • Extension Guides - Finish, publish, and distribute 2 in progress guides: "Native Plants for Pollinators" and "Valle de Oro Backyard Refuge Guide" • Trainings, Presentations, and Workshops - Complete the in progress workshop for the Zuni Pueblo • Lecture Series (August 2019) - Danielle Bilot from Univ. of Colorado to speak about "Landscape Design and Urban Pollinator Habitat" at the ABQ BioPark • Interpretive Signs for Pollinator Habitat - Complete signage for ABQ BioPark • On-Going Research - Complete collection second season of data in native plant/flower mix plots through September 2019, including visual observations and insect collections. Collection of bees (both years) to be identified to species level. IPM on Recreational Lands (original priority) Expected Outcomes/Impacts: 1) Improved recognition of tree species in NM public parks 2) Increased adoption of new monitoring strategies 3) Increased adoption of IPM tactics in parks 4) Incorporation of high species diversity supporting beneficial insects Objectives/Activities: • Complete, publish, and distribute guide "Tree resources for pollinators" • Tree Mapping - Complete and distribute map and tree guide for NM Junior College in Hobbs, NM. Map trees for St. John's College in Santa Fe • Drone survey mapping - Complete park and vineyard drone mapping for incorporation of IPM strategies

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? IPM Implementation in Communities (original priority) Develop Extension Guide - "Common Garden Pests of New Mexico and IPM Strategies" (90% complete, in progress) Content includes thorough explanation of IPM, descriptions of the 15 top most common garden insect pests in New Mexico, and a glossary. 25 pages. IPM Trainings (100% complete) Over 100 activities with IPM-related content for various stakeholders given by several NMSU Extension Specialists and IPM Program Specialists. The demonstration garden (established in YEAR 1), now called the "NMSU Los Lunas Ag. Science Center Learning Garden" was the site for stakeholder participation, internships, outreach events, school activities, and workshops. Pest & Beneficial Insect Identification Trainings (75% complete, in progress) Garden Walks, including one on insect identification and one on plant identification (to be held in July 2019), provide engaging educational opportunities using collection, monitoring, training and introductions to the app iNaturalist. Research Continues - Data collection and presentations The research component has been altered. Final results from Year One of the flower crate study showed that there was little to no difference in the diversity and abundance of beneficial insects between the treatments; therefore, due to the complexity of deploying the crates to the study sites along with the timing of flowering for the different species used, we have decided that changing this study is a better use of our resources. The scope of this priority has not changed. Evaluate and demonstrate ornamental bulb capacity for attracting beneficial insect populations in central New Mexico in late winter and early spring (new research objective, in progress) Demonstration & Study: Observation of beneficial insect activity and an educational tool for encouraging the inclusion of in late winter backyard beneficial insect habitats. Expected outcomes include newspaper columns, workshops, and programs on beneficial insect habitat enhancements. IPM Implementation in Specialty Crops: Grapes (newly initiated priority in FY2018) Monitoring of pests and efficacious resource use are critical to successful implementation of IPM in specialty crops. Although New Mexico's commercial winegrape plantings only occupy approximately 1,500 acres, the state's wine production and consumption generates substantial tax revenue. Table grapes for fresh consumption are a viable small-scale commercial crop and home garden plantings occur throughout New Mexico. Insect pests, nematodes, fungal diseases, scarcity of irrigation water, and sodic/saline soils reduce yield and quality and increase production costs of this specialty crop. Monitoring of insect pests and diseases, recognition and amelioration of unsuitable edaphic conditions and accurate estimation water stress and monitoring of water application rates can improve natural pest suppression, increase eco-services offered by perennial vineyard plantings and minimize use of synthetic pesticides and fertilizers as well as irrigation water within sustainable production schemes. The goal of grape IPM in NM is to encourage adoption in commercial, small-scale farm and home plantings via insect, nematode and disease monitoring, soil health awareness and improvement with ground covers and rootstocks, investigation of increased eco-services with pollinator beneficial insect habitat support and irrigation monitoring. Program activities include: 1) nematode survey results/manuscript publication and distribution via peer-reviewed journal (Journal of Nematology), extension bulletin(s), industry newsletter and workshops 2) soil health and eco-service impacts of vineyard ground covers with educational opportunities for workshops and presentations at academic, grower and master gardener meetings 3) water use monitoring at collaborating vineyards statewide with individual site visits to explain water conservation, irrigation efficiency and applied grapevine water use. Objectives/Activities include: peer-reviewed manuscripts, extension bulletin(s) and industry newsletter(s) and workshops. This is a collaborative effort between NMSU researchers and the state's commercial winegrowers. IPM for Pollinator Health (original priority) Extension Guides (70%, 1 complete, 2 in progress) "Backyard Beneficial Insects of New Mexico" Extension Guide H-172 52-page booklet, published in May 2019. Accessible at https://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_h/H172.pdf "Native Plants for Pollinators" (in progress) "Valle de Oro Backyard Refuge Guide" (in progress) 3 Pollinators and Beneficial Insect Identification Trainings (100% complete) 2 in Albuquerque, 1 in Santa Fe Lecture Series (100% complete) - "Healthy Habitat for Bees and Butterflies" Dr. Shaun McCoshum presented, Albuquerque BioPark Botanical Garden Presentations (100% complete) New Mexico Beekeepers Association (Albuquerque): "Bees & Native Plants" Vector Control Course (Albuquerque): "Pollinator Health" Basics of Gardening Series (Moriarty): "IPM/Beneficial Insects" Master Gardener classes (9 presentations in 8 counties): "Integrated Pest Management for Extension Master Gardeners" Workshops (70%, 2 complete, 1 in progress) Complete: final 2 of the four-part workshop series with Sandoval County Extension (seed collection and landscape design) In progress: Workshop for Zuni Pueblo Interpretive Signs for Pollinator Habitat (50%, 1 complete, 1 in progress) Complete: NMSU Los Lunas Ag. Science Center Learning Garden signage • In progress: Albuquerque Botanic Gardens Research (on-going, in progress) Collection second season of data in native plant/flower mix plots May 2019-September 2019, including visual observations and insect collections. Year 1 preliminary data has been analyzed. Year 1 collection of bees to be identified to species level (in progress). IPM on Recreational Lands (original priority) Guides (70% complete, 2 complete, 1 in progress) "IPM Strategies for Insect Pests of Trees" (complete) City of Las Cruces "Young Park Walking Tour" (complete) Tree resources for pollinators (in progress) Tree mapping at NM Junior College in Hobbs, NM (60% complete, on-going) Drone mapping (in progress) in vineyards and parks. IPM Partnerships in Wide-Area Pest Monitoring and Reporting System (priority changed) Separate funding was successfully procured in the form of a NIFA Integrated Platform for Extension and Education (IPIPE) grant. The original goals and objectives of this project were adopted under the iPIPE funding. IPM support for Pest Diagnostic Facilities (priority changed) Equipment and program materials were purchased and remaining funds are to be allocated to other project priorities.

Publications

  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Backyard Beneficial Insects of New Mexico Extension Guide H-172 52-page booklet, published in May 2019. Accessible at https://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_h/H172.pdf
  • Type: Websites Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: https://loslunassc.nmsu.edu/demonstration-garden.html


Progress 09/01/17 to 08/31/18

Outputs
Target Audience:Priority 1: IPM Implementation in Communities Homeowners and Master Gardeners were the target audience reached in the community IPM priority durning our first year of funding. Priority 2: IPM for Pollinator Health The target stakeholder groups reached for the Pollintor Helath priority included: homeowners, growers, and native plant and honey bee organizations. Priority 3: IPM on Recreational Lands The target audience EIP activities reached for IPM on Recreatioanl Lands were parks and open space managers. Priority 4: IPM Partnerships in Wide-Area Pest Monitoring For the IPM Partnerships in Wide-Area Monitoring, we have partnered with the Extension Master Gardener Program to initiate monitoring across 3 counties in New Mexico. Priority 5: IPM Support for Pest Diagnostic Facilities The Plant Diagnostic Clinic at NMSU provides diagnostic services to the state reaching growers, homeowners, open space managers and parks departments. Changes/Problems: Nothing Reported What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?As reported under products, New Mexico State Extension with support of EIP funding has provided over 50 opportunities for training and profession development on topics including: IPM, Beneficial Insect Conservation, Conservation Biological Control, Pollinator Ecology, Pollintor Conservation, Use of Drone Techonology in Pest Monitoring, Weed Identifcaiton and Management, Insect Pest Identification and Management, Disease Management, and Designing for Ecosystem services. Trainigns were offered through workshops, field days, identification walks, Extension events, and the Master Gardener Program. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?Results have been dissemanted to the communities of interest using: in-person trainings, newsletters, social media, and extension publications. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals? Nothing Reported

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? Priority 1 Accomplishments: IPM Implementation in Communities The Extension program at NMSU supports IPM education for weeds, insects, and diseases. Through workshops, field days, and garden walks, Extension specialists have collectively provided over 40 in person trainings to New Mexico stakeholders. Two extension guides have been published on the following topics: 1) Using Insectary Plants to Attract and Sustain Beneficial Insects for Biological Control and 2) Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for Home Gardeners. Advanced curriculum for IPM training for insects has been drafted, and we plan to finalize the curriculum during summer 2018. The Los Lunas Agricultural Science Center has built the capacity to host online Master Gardener trainings, and using EIP funds, we will be working with remote Extension offices in New Mexico to expand their ability to participate in online programming. NMSU has worked with the University of Wisconsin Survey Center to develop an online survey to evaluate the IPM programming offered through NMSU Extension. A test survey went out in May, and I anticipate all survey participants will receive the survey by July 2018. A demonstration garden has been established at the Los Lunas Agricultural Science Center. Research activities are underway for the 2018 field season. A total of 20 study sites have been identified, research plants (alyssum, partridge peas, coreopsis, and sunflowers) for manipulative treatments are growing in our greenhouse and two undergraduate students have been hired to assist with summer research activities. We anticipate deploying treatments across study sites in July and August 2018 during which insect data will be collected. Priority 2 Accomplishments: IPM for Pollinator Health A total of 11 presentations on pollinator ecology, identification, conservation and pest management were presented to stakeholders during the first year of EIP funding. In addition, 3 pollinator identification walks were offered at parks and field days. In collaboration with the Albuquerque Botanical Gardens, a pollinator lecture series was initiated this spring with our first invited speaker coming from the University of Florida. In year 2, we plan to host a speaker in both the fall and spring. In the first year of funding, two articles were written for the Honey Beekeepers Newsletter on pollinator habitat installation and conservation programs for pollinators. The demonstration garden established at the Los Lunas Agricultural Science Center has incorporated pollinator habitat. The research proposed for this activity is underway. A research plot was established in the fall of 2017 that included 7 different native plant treatments. Treatments consisted of different combinations of native plants with six species in each mix. The research plot was established in a RCBD design with 5 replications. Each native plant mixture will be evaluated for its attractiveness to native pollinators and natural enemies. Treatment plots will be evaluated during the 2018 field season using visual observations and vacuum sampling. Two undergraduate students have been hired and will be assisting in data collection and sample processing for summer 2018. Priority 3 Accomplishments: IPM on Recreational Lands Stakeholders working on recreational lands identified three primary needs. The first IPM need related to management of recreational lands was training in tree species identification. Parks and open space mangers identified poor tree identification skills as an impediment to effective IPM implementation. To address this need, NMSU Extension through EIP funding is partnering with communities across New Mexico to develop tree maps for training purposes. The first year of funding we collaborated with the City of Las Cruces Parks Department. An undergraduate student with a forestry background was hired to map and identify all tree species in one city park. To date, the tree survey is complete, a map has been created, a printed guide with map and tree identification tips is in progress, and each tree species in the park will be labeled with its scientific and common name. The second IPM need stakeholders identified was a pocket guide to insect pests of trees and shrubs. An undergraduate student has been hired and is working on developing this extension guide. To date, we have completed pest descriptions for 20 pests and during summer 2018, we will collect pictures for each pest. We anticipate the pocket guide will be completed and published in 2018. A grant from the New Mexico Department of Forestry is also supporting this project. The third need parks and open space managers identified was a more efficient method for pest monitoring. To address this need, NMSU is evaluating the use of drones for insect pest monitoring in urban parks and forests. This spring a drone workshop was held in collaboration with the Physical Science Laboratory's Test Site Facility at NMSU. The workshop covered the use of drones for pest monitoring as well as state and federal regulations for drone use. Drone test flights have been completed for the 2018 field season, and surveys are planned in collaboration with the Santa Fe Parks Department for pest monitoring in three parks. Priority 4 Accomplishments: IPM Partnerships in Wide-Area Pest Monitoring To improve pest and beneficial insect monitoring in New Mexico's urban landscapes, we have partnered with the Extension Master Gardener program. Master Gardeners have been recruited to participate in monitoring of insect pests and beneficial insects in their backyards during summer 2018. To date, 20 Master Gardeners have volunteered to participate in the monitoring program. Three workshops were held during spring 2018 to train volunteers on sampling protocols and teach the pest and beneficial insect groups the project will be monitoring. In addition to the Master Gardeners collecting data in backyard gardens, two undergraduate students will also monitor pest and beneficial insects in an additional 10 urban natural areas and parks. Volunteers and students will collect data twice a month June through September. To aid volunteers and students in monitoring and recording activities, a pocket guide of pictures and identification tips for beneficial and pest insects was created. Priority 5 Accomplishments: IPM Support for Pest Diagnostic Facilities The Plant Diagnostic Clinic at NMSU has received and processed over 1800 samples. This service improves IPM implementation for growers, homeowners, open space managers and parks departments by providing correct pest identification as well as IPM recommendations. In addition to providing diagnostic services, 3 pest diagnostic clinics were held at grower's markets across New Mexico in 2017 and are again planned for 2018.

Publications