Source: WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY submitted to
WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY RREA PROGRAM
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
NEW
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
1011377
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
WN.NRREA17-21
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Oct 21, 2016
Project End Date
Sep 30, 2021
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
Perleberg, A.
Recipient Organization
WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY
240 FRENCH ADMINISTRATION BLDG
PULLMAN,WA 99164-0001
Performing Department
Cooperative Extension
Non Technical Summary
SITUATION: Washington State has 215,000 families and individuals that control 5.8 million acres of forestland, making this the largest rural land use group in the state. Another 4.0 million acres of private land is grazed as either open and forested or transitory grass/ cropland. Most landowners manage for multiple objectives, such as productive timber and range land, wildlife habitat, and recreation. However, most natural resource professionals agree that the majority of landowners lack the knowledge and skill to accomplish their personal objectives. This jeopardizes the health and safety of the land, the economic well-being of the landowner, and the protection of public resources such as water, air, and wildlife. Most landowners lack a written management plan which provides the biological, physical, and political information necessary to make sound decisions in order to execute best practices in a logical and feasible manner. Forest and range owners need a surround-sound approach of educational deliveries of management information to protect their values without compromising those amenity and commodity forest and range values for themselves, society, and future for generations. PURPOSE: The purpose of our RREA program is to provide organized educational opportunities to meet the needs of Washington's forest and rangeland owners.
Animal Health Component
0%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
(N/A)
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
1230699302090%
1210799302010%
Goals / Objectives
Goal is to enhance resource management on working forests and rangelands. Specifically, we will focus on forest and rangeland stewardship and health. Our focus is watershed protection and management; management and control of forest and range fires, and the management and sustainability of forest and range resources.
Project Methods
Project will deliver research-based information about fundamental management practices and emerging issues. Mode of delivery will be a blend of time-tested best practices, such as forest and range owner's field days and Coached Forest Stewardship Planning Shortcourses, as well as online delivery via streaming videos, webinars, and e-newsletters. Evaluation will combine self-reported changes in awareness and knowledge, positive changes in behavior in executing new and best practices, and observed and research-based expectations in creating a more desirable future condition. Indicators of changes include number of educational events; number of landowners and managers trained to develop Stewardship Plans; number of Stewardship Plans written; number of acres impacted by future planning and present treatments; number of direct and Indirect contacts who Increased awareness and knowledge of the benefits and opportunities in forest and range management; number of dollars earned or saved.

Progress 10/01/19 to 09/30/20

Outputs
Target Audience:Audience includes 1) non-industrial private forest (aka "family forest") owners and rangeland owners, and 2) natural resource professionals. Owners include 1) NEW & BEGINNING family forest owners; 2) EXPERIENCED & MULTI-GENERATIONAL "LEGACY" forest owners; 3) UNDERSERVED forest owners; and 4) LIMITED INCOME OPPORTUNITY forest owners. Military veteran educational programming was part of our FY20 discussions, and we have established plans to engage veterans with forestry and ranch training at our new WSU Vetter Demonstration Farm. Natural resource professionals include a spectrum ranging from limited- education contractors, many whom are members of and work for Native American Indian tribes, and, Latino silvicultural contractors who tend to have limited English-speaking skills. Other professionals are well-educated, and generally representative of Washington State gender, age, racial, and ethnic distribution. Changes/Problems:Our popular summer field days, winter schools, and workshops all went online due to COVID-19 protections. We have seen a significant leap in attendance by forest and nonforest-owning attendees. While target audience remains families and managers of private forest land, our RREA program has contributed substantially to public (community) eduction and to natural resource professional development. Many public lands foresters, NGOs, tribes, and elected officials (and their staff) were able to learn about subjects relevant to family forestland ownership, of which most of those groups had admittedly never considered. This was a win-win when education could be broadcast primarily through Zoom, with no fee ($ cost), and with the safety and convenience of attending from thier home or offices. This year may be the most noteworthy year in our RREA-program history in terms of program attendance and creating awarenss. What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?The RREA program provided the opportunity for 6 extension educators to attend and present RREA outcomes at state and national networking endeavors, many of which were online due to COVID protections, and included: 1) National Leadership Conference of the American Tree Farm System, 2) Society of American Foresters Washington State and National conventions, 3) the Society of Rangeland Management, 4) Agroforestry in the Pacific Northwest Workgroup Training, 5) Empowering Tribal Culture, Ecology, and Food Systems, USDA Forest Service, 6) From Dissemination to Impact: Using Peer to Peer learning in Natural Resource Extension, Penn State University, U. Minn, and Colorado State U. NIFA-sponsored Workshop, 7) Using Innovative Educational Approaches to Enhance Ecosystem Health, U. Minn and Clemson University. NIFA-sponsored Workshop, 8) SAF virtual town hall for leadership, 9) From Zoology to Forestry to Increasing Narratives in University Curriculum, Northwest Indian College - Nez Perce, 10) Root & Butt Decays in Conifers: Identification & Management, 11) Foresters Roundtable, Coeur d'Alene, and 12) Shared Stewardship Peer Learning Session, National Forest Foundation, the National Association of State Foresters, and the Western Forestry Leadership Coalition. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?Project results were quantified using the WSU annual reporting system (Activity Insight). Program outreach and accomplishment reporting was achieved through a variety of delivery methods (face to face leadership and coordinating meetings, web-based; newsletters, etc.), pedagogical methodology, and civic and professional engagement (oral and poster presentations at local, state, and national conferences and meetings, some as virtual conferences). We advanced our RREA agroforestry transfer by creating a tribal agroforestry group to work concurrently with our Pacific Northwest Agroforestry Workgroup; a west-side Cascades workshop was postponed in spring of 2020, and we expect to combine the tribal forestry with the PNW group when properly safe to convene. When appropriate, evaluation data was shared with cooperating agencies, organizations, and elected officials. At the most local level, several opportunities have been taken to present the Extension Forestry and Rangeland Management Program directly to county commissioners face to face, or through the county agents, as well as state legislators. Some impacts of the including cultural resources education in all of our forestry curriculum has been the opportunity to collaborate with the Kalispel Tribe for utilizing their Indian Creek Community Forest for landowner trainings in wildfire hazard treatment education, demonstrating various fuels management choices. Another collaboration has been the opportunity for the forest landowner community to participate in the prescribed fire activities being conducted by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?We will follow our 2016-2021 WSU Strategic Plan for Enhancing Natural Resources and the Environment, as well as our 2016-2021 5-year RREA Plan of Work for Forest and Rangeland Stewardship and Health. Landowner needs assessment has been coordinated with the Washington State 10-year Forest Action Plan (now under revision) and a statewide Forest Health and Resiliency Initiative. With RREA support, a partnership grant with the WA Dept of Natural Resources and US Forest Service Western Competitive Grants, and a grant through the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service - Regional Conservation Partnership Program, two educators will engage family forest and rangeland owners in northeast and southwest Washington. These educators are located in the most important regions of Washington State for timber production and salmon recovery (southwest WA), and for fire hazard risk abatement and forest health improvement in NE WA. Both positions were eliminated by WSU but have been hired through these grants, and are identified as priorities for future permanent hiring; RREA has helped to sustain educational assistance through innovative partnerships and leveraging staff to provide invaluable technical and educational assistance to families and communities. As a result of COVID, funding planned to execute face to face workshops was re-designed to obtain necessary technology equipment for delivering forest health and stewardship information in an alternate and even more-accessible format, explaining our jump in program attendance during this remote learning epoch.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? The Forest and Rangeland Stewardship and Health Project delivered research-based information about fundamental management practices and emerging issues to 9,617 landowners and managers. Mode of delivery was a blend of time-tested best practices resulting in 101 events, including 38 workshops, five hands-on demonstrations, four 8-week Coached Forest Stewardship Planning Shortcourses, a Virtual Forest and Range Owners Field Day, 62 online deliveries via social media, streaming videos, podcasts, webinars, and e-newsletters distributed to 35,912 landowners. Evaluations combined self-reported changes in awareness and knowledge (92%, n=8,847 landowners), expected positive changes in behavior in executing new and best practices (88%, n=8,427), and observed and research-based expectations in creating a more desirable future condition. Indicators of progress include number of educational events (101); number of landowners and managers trained to develop Stewardship Plans (406 families); number of Stewardship Plans written or initiated (236); number of acres impacted by future planning and present treatments (245,268 acres); number of direct and indirect contacts who increased awareness and knowledge of the benefits and opportunities in forest and range management (656,108 landowners). Increased forage production, tree growth, and protection from wildfire, pests, and other damage agents are worth an estimated $75.5 million earned and saved.

Publications

  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Hill, D., S. Alexander, and A. B. Perleberg. 2020. WSU Vetter Demonstration Forest, Forest Stewardship Plan. Technical Report, Washington Department of Natural Resources.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Hudson, Tipton D. Conversation as an Education Medium for the Age of Distraction - the Art of Range Podcast. Rangelands 42, no. 1 (February 1, 2020): 916. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rala.2020.01.005.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Perleberg, A. B. Hanley, D.P., G. Kuhn, D.J. Robinson, B. Hanley. 2020. Davenport Living Snow Fence Demonstration: 15-Year Survival and Growth Update. Technical Bulletin TB06, Washington State University, Pullman, WA.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Shults, P. Seeking Ideal Mushroom Conditions. The Forestry Source. Vol 23, No. 12, 15 (2020)
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Shults, P. Hot, Dry Summers Take a Toll on Trees in Western Washington. Agriculture Climate Network Newsletter (November 2020)
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Shults P., ODea J., Bramwell S. Adapting Mushroom Forest Farming Practices to the Pacific Northwest. Association for Temperate Agroforestry Newsletter. Vol. 26 No.23 (Sept 2020)
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Forest Stewardship in the Chehalis River Basin. WSU Extension Impact Report. (2020)
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Shults, P., Nzokou, P. & Koc, I. Nitrogen contributions of alley cropped Trifolium pratense may sustain short rotation woody crop yields on marginal lands. Nutr Cycl Agroecosyst 117, 261272 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10705-020-10068-8
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Perleberg, A. B. 2020. Two-year Family Forest Succession Planning Education Campaign Achieves Surprising Impacts in Washington State. USDA Extension Risk Management Center. Denver, Co. http://erme.events/erme2020/conference-schedule
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Perleberg, A. B. 2019. Succession Planning for Washingtons Forest Landowners. Louisville, KY:. http://erme.events/
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Niemeyer, R., Tague, C. T. N., Adam, J. C., Burke, W., Perleberg, A. B., Schnepf, C. 2019. Forest Restoration, Streamflow, and Stakeholder Engagement: Integrating Forest Owner & Manager Input with Hydro-Ecological Simulations. Washington, D.C.: AGU Fall Meeting 2019. AGU. https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/612717
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. 2020. WSU Extension to Accelerate Forest Management Planning and Execution in Northeast Washington. Forest Stewardship Notes
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Perleberg, A. B. and J. Way. 2020. Washington Estate Tax. Northwest Woodlands, Winter, Vol 37(1). Pg 20-22.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. 2019. Extension Risk Management Education National Conference, "Succession Planning for Washingtons Forest Landowners, Extension Risk Management Education Center, Louisville.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Perleberg, A. B. 2020. Fall Seminar Series, "Options, Choices, and Resources when Harvesting Timber," Washington Tree Farm Program, Olympia, WA, United States of America.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Qualified Inspector Training, "Qualified Inspector Training," American Tree Farm System, webinar.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Perleberg, A. B. 2019. Executive Board Meeting of the Washington Society of American Foresters, "Shared Stewardship Conference Proposal," Washington Society of American Foresters, Olympia, WA, United States of America.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Perleberg, A. B. 2019. Northeast Washington Farm Forestry Association Annual Winter Meeting, "Information for your Brain, Transformation for your Land," Washington Farm Forestry Association, Chewelah, WA, United States of America. (invited)
  • Type: Websites Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: WSU Extension Forestry, updated FY2020. http://forestry.wsu.edu/ The WSU Extension Forestry program provides unbiased, research-based education serving owners and managers of forestland in Washington State.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2020 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Armillaria Oysteae  tree death. Lake Wenatchee, WA. https://images.bugwood.org/contrib/editinfo.cfm?batch=44905#1 Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Western Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus brevicomis). Lake Wenatchee, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/ff10b29d-0b5a-4dfc-9e8c-b416c45fab8/IMG_2433.JPG Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Western Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus brevicomis), South-side Woodpecker-flecked Bark. Lake Wenatchee, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/ff10b29d-0b5a-4dfc-9e8c-b416c45fab8/IMG_2436.JPG Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Western Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus brevicomis), South-side Woodpecker-flecked Bark. Lake Wenatchee, WA. https://images.bugwood.org/contrib/editinfo.cfm?batch=44905#1 Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Mixed Ponderosa Pine and Douglas-fir. Lake Wenatchee, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/ff10b29d-0b5a-4dfc-9e8c-b416c45fab8/IMG_2441.JPG Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Ponderosa pine killed by Ips pini, Douglas-fir unharmed I. Cle Elum, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/2121b1a3-6005-44d5-8b0a-52b036cbcaa/IMG_2204.JPG Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Ponderosa pine killed by Ips pini, Douglas-fir unharmed. Cle Elum, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/2121b1a3-6005-44d5-8b0a-52b036cbcaa/IMG_2225.JPG Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Ponderosa pine killed by Ips pini. Cle Elum, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/2121b1a3-6005-44d5-8b0a-52b036cbcaa/IMG_2222.JPG Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Ponderosa Pine. Co-dominant, two-topped, split tree breakage I. Cle Elum, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/c803feec-0361-4447-a7be-43e163dc34d/IMG_2211.JPG Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Ponderosa Pine. Co-dominant, two-topped, split tree breakage II. Cle Elum, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/c803feec-0361-4447-a7be-43e163dc34d/IMG_2212.JPG Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Ponderosa Pine. Co-dominant, two-topped, split tree breakage III. Cle Elum, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/c803feec-0361-4447-a7be-43e163dc34d/IMG_2213.JPG Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Ponderosa Pine. Co-dominant, two-topped, split tree breakage IV. Cle Elum, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/c803feec-0361-4447-a7be-43e163dc34d/IMG_2214.JPG Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Ponderosa Pine. Co-dominant, two-topped, split tree breakage V. Cle Elum, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/c803feec-0361-4447-a7be-43e163dc34d/IMG_2215.JPG Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Ponderosa Pine. Co-dominant, two-topped, split tree breakage VI. Cle Elum, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/c803feec-0361-4447-a7be-43e163dc34d/IMG_2216.JPG Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Ponderosa Pine. Co-dominant, two-topped, split tree breakage VII. Cle Elum, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/c803feec-0361-4447-a7be-43e163dc34d/IMG_2217.JPG Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Douglas-fir beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae) I. Lake Wenatchee, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/c803feec-0361-4447-a7be-43e163dc34d/IMG_2406.JPG Perleberg, A.B. 2020. Douglas-fir beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae) II. Lake Wenatchee, WA. https://secure.bugwoodcloud.org/bugwoodimages/uploads/user/54406/2121b1a3-6005-44d5-8b0a-52b036cbcaa/IMG_2222.JPG


Progress 10/01/18 to 09/30/19

Outputs
Target Audience:Audience includes 1) non-industrial private forest (aka "family forest") owners and rangeland owners, and 2) natural resource professionals. Owners include 1) NEW & BEGINNING family forest owners; 2) EXPERIENCED & MULTI-GENERATIONAL "LEGACY" forest owners; 3) UNDERSERVED forest owners; and 4) LIMITED INCOME OPPORTUNITY forest owners. Military veteran educational programming was part of our FY19 discussions, but we have not yet established program plans aimed at this group of forest and rangeland owners. Natural resource professionals include a spectrum ranging from limited-education contractors, many whom are members of and work for Native American Indian tribes, and, Latino silvicultural who tend to have limited English speaking skills. Other professionals are well-educated, and generally representative of Washington State Department of Natural Resources agency gender, age, racial, and ethnic distribution. Changes/Problems: Nothing Reported What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?The RREA program provided the opportunity for 7 extension educators (including one adjunct instructor) to attend and present RREA outcomes at state and national networking endeavors including 1) International Association of Temperate Agroforestry, 2) Society of American Foresters Washington State and National conventions, 3) the Society of Rangeland Management, 4) Agroforestry in the Pacific Northwest Workgroup Training, 5) National Leadership Convention of the American Tree Farm System, 6) Chehalis Poplar Plantation Tour, 7) "FCWG Learning Exchange Series", Forest Climate Working Group - Michigan State University, Online, 8) "Seeding Success: Tools, Technology and Techniques for Successful Extension Natural Resources Career", Seeding Success, Online, 9) "Bogs and Outwash - Growing Uneven-aged Douglas Fir in the Puget Sound Area," Forest Stewards Guild, 10) Red Alder Plantation Management: Site Selection to Final Harvest, Hardwood Silviculture Cooperative, 11) "Forest Research Updates," US Forest Service - Research Station, and 12) participation in the WCC 1006 Western Extension Forestry Coordinating Committee Meeting in Payson, AZ, where networking with other western states proved beneficial and has resulted in new collaborative projects. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?Project results were quantified using the WSU annual reporting system (Activity Insight). Program outreach and accomplishment reporting was achieved through a variety of delivery methods (face to face leadership and coordinating meetings, web-based; newsletters, etc.), pedagogical methodology, and civic and professional engagement (oral and poster presentations at local, state, and national conferences and meetings). We advanced our RREA agroforestry transfer by hosting a workshop and field trip in Spokane, coordinated by the Pacific Northwest Agroforestry Workgroup. A west-side Cascades version of this workshop is being planned and will take place near Eugene, OR, in spring of 2020. When appropriate, evaluation data was shared with cooperating agencies, organizations, and elected officials. At the most local level, several opportunities have been taken to present the Extension Forestry and Rangeland Management Program directly to county commissioners face to face, or through the county agents, as well as state legislators. One impact of the agroforestry workshop has been the formalizing of plans to creating a Tribal Agroforestry workshop, focusing on valued plant and forest use and conservation needs and products, revealed through collaboration with the Intertribal Timber Council, the Intertribal Nursery Council, the Northwest Native Basketweavers Association, and the USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station and Southwest Research Station. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?We will follow our 2016-2021 WSU Strategic Plan for Enhancing Natural Resources and the Environment, as well as our 2016-2021 5-year RREA Plan of Work for Forest and Rangeland Stewardship and Health. Landowner needs assessment has been coordinated with the Washington State 10-year Forest Action Plan (now under revision) and a statewide Forest Health and Resiliency Initiative. With RREA support, a partnership grant with the WA Dept of Natural Resources and US Forest Service Western Competitive Grants, and a grant through the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service - Regional Conservation Partnership Program, two educators (one already hired, one to be hired in 2020) will engage family forest and rangeland owners in northeast and southwest Washington. These educators will be located in the most important regions of Washington State for timber production and salmon recovery (southwest WA), and for fire hazard risk abatement and forest health improvement in NE WA. Both positions were eliminated by WSU but have been identified as priorities for future permanent hiring; RREA has helped to sustain educational assistance through innovative partnerships and leveraging staff to provide invaluable technical and educational assistance to families and communities. RREA has made it possible for western Washington forest owners to receive one-on-one technical assistance, a service considered critical for forest stewardship planning and best management practice execution.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? The Forest and Rangeland Stewardship and Health Project delivered research-based information about fundamental management practices and emerging issues to 2,599 landowners and managers. Mode of delivery was a blend of time-tested best practices resulting in 106 events, including 101 workshops, 3 Forest and Range Owners Field Days and five 8-week Coached Forest Stewardship Planning Shortcourses, as well as 22 online deliveries via social media, streaming videos, webinars, and e-newsletters distributed to 34,202 landowners. Evaluations combined self-reported changes in awareness and knowledge (96%, n=2,547 landowners), positive changes in behavior in executing new and best practices (90%, n=2,288 landowners), and observed and research-based expectations in creating a more desirable future condition. Indicators of changes include number of educational events (106); number of landowners and managers trained to develop Stewardship Plans (308 families); number of Stewardship Plans written or initiated (488); number of acres impacted by future planning and present treatments (156,995 acres); number of direct and indirect contacts who Increased awareness and knowledge of the benefits and opportunities in forest and range management (34,202 landowners); number of dollars earned or saved ($25,740,000).

Publications

  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Perleberg, A. B. 2019. Practical Applied Silviculture Practices for Foresters. Washington Association of District Employees (WADE) conference. Leavenworth, WA. June 10  12, 2019.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Perleberg, A. B. 2019. Succession Planning for Landowners. Washington Association of District Employees (WADE) conference. Leavenworth, WA. June 10  12, 2019.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Shults, P. 2019. Growing forest stewardship in the Chehalis River Basin through outreach and education. Poster. WSU 2019 Academic Showcase. 02/2019.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Shults, P. Tree Profile: Red Alder. Forest Stewardship Notes. Olympia, WA: Washington Department of Natural Resources. https://foreststewardshipnotes.wordpress.com/2018/10/15/tree-profile-red-alder/.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Shults, P. 2018. WSUs New Extension Forester Focuses on Forest Stewardship in the Chehalis River Basin. Small Forest Landowner News. Olympia, WA. Washington Department of Natural Resources. https://sflonews.wordpress.com/2018/11/28/wsus-new-extension-forester-for-focuses-on-forest-stewardship-in-the-chehalis-river-basin/.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Shults, P. 2019. Why do Log Prices Differ between Eastern and Western Washington? Forest Stewardship Notes. Olympia, WA: Washington Department of Natural Resources. https://foreststewardshipnotes.wordpress.com/2019/01/31/why-do-log-prices-differ-between-eastern-and-western-washington/.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Shults, P. (Panelist), Working Lands and Conservation Community Meeting, "Small Forest Landowner Panel," Pacific Northwest Coast Landscape Conservation Design, Chehalis, WA, United States of America. (November 2, 2018). (Invited)
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Shults, P. (Presenter), Forest Stewardship Coached Planning, Forest Health, Inventory, and Thinning Practicum, Washington State University Extension, Olympia, WA. (October 20, 2018).
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Shults, P. (Presenter), Forest Stewardship Coached Planning, Special Forest Products. Washington State University Extension, Chehalis, WA. (October 29, 2018).
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Shults, P. (Presenter), Small Farm Workshop Series, "Agroforestry and Woodlot Management for Small Farms in SW Washington," Washington State University Extension, Vancouver, WA, United States of America. (November 1, 2018). (Invited)
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Shults, P. (Presenter), Forest Stewardship Coached Planning, Moving Forward in Stewardship, Washington State University Extension, Chehalis, WA. (November 5, 2018).
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Niemeyer, R. J.; Tague, C.; Adam, J. C.; Schnepf, C.; Perleberg, A. B.; Nguyen, T. T. 2018. Forest thinning in dry forests: improving the resilience of forest health and streamflow in the Pacific Northwest. American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2018.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Truscott, S. 2019. Extension foresters expand stewardship education to save Washington forests. WSU Insider. Pullman, WA. Avilable 12/30/2019 https://news.wsu.edu/2019/11/22/extension-foresters-expand-stewardship-education-save-washington-forests/ . Media Contribution.
  • Type: Websites Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: WSU Extension Forestry, updated FY2019. http://forestry.wsu.edu/ The WSU Extension Forestry program provides objective, research-based education and resources for owners of forested property as well as the general public. We offer classes, workshops, and field days as well as publications, videos, and online resources to help you achieve your goals as a forest owner. We invite you to browse the vast resources on this site.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Forest Stewardship Notes. An e-Newsletter for technical information relevant to family forest owners. Editor: Patrick Shults
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Perleberg, A. B., Hanley, D. P., Kuhn, G., Robinson, D., Hanley, B. B. (2019). 15-Year Survival and Growth Review of the Davenport Living Snow Fence Demonstration in Washington State. Lincoln, NE: USDA Forest Service, National Agroforestry Center. https://afta2019.org : wp-content : uploads : 2019-NAAC-Abstracts
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Perleberg, A. B. (2019). Forest and Range Owners Field Day Scheduled for Southcentral Washington (Issue 11 ed., vol. Vol. 38). News of the Washington Cattlemens & Cattlewomens Associations. www.washingtoncattlemen.org : June-KP
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Perleberg, A. B., 2019 Extension Risk Management Education National Conference, "Succession Planning for Washingtons Forest Landowners," Extension Risk Management Education Center, Louisville, United States of America. (April 28, 2019).
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Hudson, T., 31st Family Forest Landowners & Managers Conference, "Forest Grazing," Idaho Forest Owners Association, Moscow, United States of America. (March 24, 2019).
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A., Coached Forest Stewardship Planning Shortcourse, Leavenworth, "Intro to Forest Ownership & Intro to Forest Ecology & Intro to Silvics & Intro to Silviculture," Washington State University, LEAVENWORTH, United States of America. (November 14, 2018).
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Perleberg, A. B., DNR Forest Health Division - Communications, "Teaching Landowners About Forest Health," WA Dept of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA, United States of America. (October 29, 2018).
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Glover, J. 2018. "Could a megafire similar to those menacing California erupt in Spokane? Expert says Its just a matter of time." Spokesman Review.(November 14, 2018). Media Contribution. https://www.spokesman.com/frontpage/2018/nov/13/
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Figueroa, P., Perleberg, A. B. Dangers You Ought to be Aware of While Working in the Forest. Corvallis, Oregon: Association for Temperate Agroforestry. https://afta2019.org


Progress 10/01/17 to 09/30/18

Outputs
Target Audience:Audience includes forest and rangeland owners and natural resource professionals. Changes/Problems: Nothing Reported What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?The RREA program provided the opportunity for 10 extension educators to attend and present RREA outcomes at state and national networking endeavors including 1) Association of Natural Resource Extension Professionals biennial conference, 2) Society of American Foresters, and 3) the Society of Rangeland Management. In addition, three new extension educators attended the Western Extension Forestry Coordinating Meeting in Vancouver, WA, where networking with other western states proved beneficial and has resulted in new collaborative projects. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?Project results were quantified using the WSU annual reporting system (Activity Insight). Program outreach and accomplishment reporting was achieved through a variety of delivery methods (web-based; newsletters, etc.), pedagogical methodology, and civic and professional presentations (oral and poster at local, state, and national conferences and meetings). We advanced our RREA agroforestry transfer with a webinar that was hosted by the Forest Service and was conveyed nationally. Our forest stewardship and health Extension program was also featured for NRCS and its partners through the state office monthly webinar. When appropriate, evaluation data was shared with cooperating agencies, organizations, and elected officials. At the most local level, several opportunities have been taken to present the Extension Forestry and Rangeland Management Program directly to county commissioners face to face, or through the county agents, as well as state legislators. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?We will follow our 2016-2020 WSU Strategic Plan for Enhancing Natural Resources and the Environment, as well as our 2016-2020 5-year RREA Plan of Work for Forest and Rangeland Stewardship and Health. With RREA support and through a partnership grant with the WA Dept of Natural Resources and US Forest Service Western Competitive Grants, we are adding two educators becasue of of the demonstrated and substantial demand by family forest and rangeland owners in northeast and southwest Washington. These educators will be located in the most important regions of Washington State for timber production and salmon recovery (southwest WA), and for fire hazard risk abatement and forest health improvement in NE WA. Both of these positions were eliminated by WSU but have been identified as priorities for future hiring; RREA has helped to sustain educational assistance through innovative partnerships and leveraging staff to provide invaluable technical and educational assistance to families and communities. RREA has made it possible for western Washington forest owners to receive one-on-one technical assitance, a service considered critical for forest stewardship planning and best management practice execution.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? The Forest and Rangeland Stewardship and Health Project delivered research-based information about fundamental management practices and emerging issues to 3,165 landowners and managers. Mode of delivery was a blend of time-tested best practices, including 69 workshops, 2 Forest and Range Owners Field Days and three 8-week Coached Forest Stewardship Planning Shortcourses, as well as 19 online deliveries via streaming videos, webinars, and e-newsletters distributed to 34,015 landowners. Evaluations combined self-reported changes in awareness and knowledge (96%, n=3,642 landowners), positive changes in behavior in executing new and best practices (90%, n=3,384 landowners), and observed and research-based expectations in creating a more desirable future condition. Indicators of changes include number of educational events (77); number of landowners and managers trained to develop Stewardship Plans (272 families); number of Stewardship Plans written or initiated (295); number of acres impacted by future planning and present treatments (189,217 acres); number of direct and indirect contacts who Increased awareness and knowledge of the benefits and opportunities in forest and range management (36,580 landowners); number of dollars earned or saved ($28,087,500).

Publications

  • Type: Websites Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: WSU Extension Forestry http://forestry.wsu.edu/ http://forestry.wsu.edu/nps/ http://forestry.wsu.edu/sw/ Includes Contacts, Directories, Publications, and Events.
  • Type: Other Status: Awaiting Publication Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. 2018. Colville-Little Spokane Basin Master Forest Stewardship Project Plan for the Landscape-Scale Restoration Program, Western States Competitive Grants, US Forest Service. WA Dept. of Natural Resources. Olympia, WA.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Niemeyer, R.J., Tague, C., Adam, J.C., Schnepf, C., Perleberg, A.B., Nguyen, T.T. 2018. Forest thinning in dry forests: improving the resilience of forest health and streamflow in the Pacific Northwest. 2018 American Geophysical Conference Fall Meeting, Washington D.C.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. Introduction to Silviculture. 2018. WSU-DNR Forest Stewardship Shortcourse. Leavenworth, WA.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. Forest Management Planning. 2018. Forest Stewardship Shortcourse. Leavenworth, WA.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. Riparian Forest Management. 2018. North Olympic Streamkeepers, Pt. Angeles, WA.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. Educating Non-Industrial Private Forest Landowners. 2018. Northeast Washington Forestry Coalition and USFS Colville National Forest Advisory Committee, Joint Meeting, Colville, WA.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. WSU Extension Forestry Facing Opportunity. 2017. Matchmaker Symposia, Washington State University, Pullman, WA.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. Silviculture for Enhancing Forest Health and Reducing Wildfire Hazard Risk. 2018. Blue Mountains Forest Owners Workshop, Dayton, WA.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. Renewable Resources Extension Act at Washington State University. 2018. Association of Natural Resource Extension Professionals, Biloxi, MS.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. What You Ought to Know About the Western Coordinating Committee. 2018. 2018. Association of Natural Resource Extension Professionals, Biloxi, MS.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. Forest Stewardship Planning in Washington State. 2018. WA Association of County Assessors, Ellensburg, WA.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. Silviculture for Improving Forest Health and Abating Wildfire Hazard. 2018. Central Washington Forest Stewardship Shortcourse, Cle Elum, WA.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. American Tree Farm System, Management Planning for Inspectors. 2018. Washington Tree Farm Program, Central Washington, Wenatchee, WA.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. American Tree Farm System, Management Planning for Inspectors. 2018. Washington Tree Farm Program, Inland Empire, Spokane, WA.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. Engaging Landowners Effectively to Actively Manage Their Forests. 2018. WA Association of District Employees, Technical Conference, Leavenworth, WA.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Awaiting Publication Year Published: 2017 Citation: Perleberg, A.B., and J. Dobrowolski. 2018. Forestland Grazing in the Inland Northwest. WSU Extension Fact Sheet ##.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Awaiting Publication Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. 2018. Managing Your Timber Sale. WSU Extension Bulletin EB1818, Pullman, WA.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Forest Stewardship Notes e-newsletter (quarterly). 2018. P. Shults (Ed.). Washington State University Extension Forestry and the DNR Small Forest Landowner Office. Olympia, WA.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Awaiting Publication Year Published: 2018 Citation: Perleberg, A.B., D. Hanley, G. Kuhn, D.J. Robinson, B. Hanley, B. Hanley. 2018. Davenport living snow fence demonstration: fifteen-year survival and growth summary. Technical Bulletin TB06, Washington State University Extension, Pullman, WA.


Progress 10/21/16 to 09/30/17

Outputs
Target Audience:Audience includes forest and rangeland owners and natural resource professionals. Changes/Problems: Nothing Reported What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?RREA project has provided for attendance to conferences where attendees learned during sessions, networking, and while contributing to the program. Also, RREA was utilized to fund one annual statewide team meeting to gain technical and administrative information and to coordinate activities. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?Project results were quantified using the WSU annual reporting system (Activity Insight). Program outreach and accomplishment reporting was achieved through a variety of media methods (web-based; newsletters, etc), pedagogical methodology, and civic and professional presentations (oral and poster). When appropriate, evaluation data was shared with cooperating agencies, organizations, and elected officials. At the most local level, several opportunities have been taken to present the Extension Forestry and Rangleand Management Program directly to county commissioners face to face, or through the county agent, as well as state legislators. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?We will follow our 2016-2020 WSU Strategic Plan for Enhancing Natural Resources and the Environment, as well as our 2016-2020 5-year RREA Plan of Work for Forest and Rangeland Stewardship and Health.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? The Forest and Rangeland Stewardship and Health Project delivered research-based information about fundamental management practices and emerging issues to 3,110 landowners and managers. Mode of delivery was a blend of time-tested best practices, including 3 Forest and Range Owners Field Days and one 8-week Coached Forest Stewardship Planning Shortcourses, as well as 32 online deliveries via streaming videos, webinars, and e-newsletters distributed to 64,335 landowners. Evaluations combined self-reported changes in awareness and knowledge (98%, n=3,047 landowners), positive changes in behavior in executing new and best practices (90%, n=2,810 landowners), and observed and research-based expectations in creating a more desirable future condition. Indicators of changes include number of educational events (54); number of landowners and managers trained to develop Stewardship Plans (68 families); number of Stewardship Plans written (49); number of acres impacted by future planning and present treatments (10,885 acres); number of direct and indirect contacts who Increased awareness and knowledge of the benefits and opportunities in forest and range management (88,000 landowners); number of dollars earned or saved ($22,858,500).

Publications

  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Perleberg, A. B. (Author & Presenter), Westergreen, T. (Author & Presenter), American Tree Farm System National Leadership Conference, "Leadership is a Contact Sport: Learning by Doing," American Forest Foundation, Washington, DC. (February 21, 2017).
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Perleberg, A. B., "Qualified Inspector Training, American Tree Farm System," WSU Extension and Washington Tree Farm Program, Spokane, WA. (January 18, 2017).
  • Type: Other Status: Submitted Year Published: 2017 Citation: Perleberg, A. B., Agroforestry Assistance, "Agroforestry Educational and Technical Assistance in the USDA Forest Stewardship Program," WSU Extension, Spokane, WA. (January 17, 2017).
  • Type: Websites Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: WSU Extension Forestry Includes Contacts, Directories, Publications, and Events.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Under Review Year Published: 2017 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. and Others. 2017. Managing Your Timber Sale. WSU Extension Bulletin (in progress - revision).
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Perleberg, A.B. 2017. Chehalis Basin Master Forest Stewardship Plan. Instructional Manual. WA Dept. of Natural Resources.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Weikel, J., K. Bevis, A.B. Perleberg, D.P. Hanley, and J. Bottorff. 2017. Westside Douglas-Fir Forests and Wildlife: Management Tools for Family Forest Owners. Woodland Fish and Wildlife Group, World Forestry Center.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Awaiting Publication Year Published: 2017 Citation: Perleberg, A.B., and J. Dobowolski. 2017. Forestland Grazing. WSU Extension Bulletin, Pullman, WA.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Gibbs, S., A.B. Perleberg, J. Sackett, T. Miketa, B. Norton. 2017. Washington State Integrated Forest Management Plan. WA Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Perleberg, A. B., Matchmaking for Interdisciplinary Research, "WSU Extension Forestry Facing Opportunity," Washington State University, Office of Research Services, Pullman, WA. (October 2, 2017).
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Perleberg, A. B., Tree Farmers Do It All  Wood, Water, Recreation and Wildlife, "2017 WSU Forestry Extension Events Help Landowners," 2017 WA Farm Forestry Association and WA Tree Farm Program Joint Annual Meeting, Bothell, WA. (May 4, 2017).
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Perleberg, A. B., Joint Annual Meeting of Washington Chapters of The Wildlife Society and the Society of American Foresters, "Forest Owner Field Days a Twenty-Year Success in Washington State," Washington Chapters of The Wildlife Society and the Society of American Foresters, yakima, WA, United States of America. (April 2017).