Source: IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY submitted to
ENGINEERING FOR FOOD SAFETY AND QUALITY
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
REVISED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
1007349
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
IOW05447
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
NC-_old1023
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Oct 1, 2015
Project End Date
Sep 30, 2020
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
Lamsal, BU, P.
Recipient Organization
IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
2229 Lincoln Way
AMES,IA 50011
Performing Department
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Non Technical Summary
With continual food recalls due to contamination of foods (eggs, lettuce, spinach, hydrolyzed vegetable protein, peanuts, pistachios, milk, etc.) by foodborne illness microorganisms and allergens, there is an increasing demand by consumers for safe, fresh-like, nutritious, quality food. These factors continue to challenge the US food processing industry. Emerging pathogenic microorganisms and allergens, tolerant to conventional treatment methods, create a demand for improved and novel food processes. Consumers expect foods to be safe, so that they can concentrate on the quality, nutritious, and healthy aspects of their food supply. The industry must constantly redefine technology to assure wholesomeness in processed foods. Thus, new and existing technologies must meet the challenge and play a pivotal role in improving the quality of value-added food products. Without extensive research, it would be difficult for the industry to meet these demands. To effectively compete in the global markets, the US food industry requires ready access to the scientific knowledge, well-prepared personnel, and a continuous dialog between academic researchers and industry practitioners. Collaborations among engineers, food scientists and other experts within the university setting, and across the nation can effectively address these needs of the industry by advancing technologies through research, preparing our future work force through educating the students, and bridging the gap between research and implementation through outreach. This project will provide safety and improve quality of food products via utilizing innovative methods to characterize food materials and packaging, develop new and improved processing technologies (such as high pressure processing and temperature assisted high pressure processing, irradiation, cleaning/sanitation of fresh fruits and vegetables prior and during processing), develop mathematical models to characterize quality and safety changes, develop pedagogical methodologies for improved learning of food engineering principles, and develop outreach programs to disseminate best practices for enhancing food safety and quality to stakeholders. The stakeholders impacted by this project will include the food industry, federal regulatory agencies, university curricula (students and faculty), and consumers. The research outcomes of this project will be used to enhance education and outreach programs for students and stakeholders. In addition to publishing refereed journal articles, book chapters, books, and conference presentations, there will be a number of active workshops, and demonstrations of advances in technologies to stakeholders. The expected output/impacts will cause a change in knowledge, actions, and a change in condition. New knowledge about existing and new technologies that will improve the safety and quality of foods will be developed. Students will have improved skills, and be better able to apply their knowledge in problem solving/decision-making. The results of this project will improve the both old and new technologies that will be adopted by the food industry. These improvements will help the industry to produce a safer, high quality, and nutritious food supply.
Animal Health Component
0%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
30%
Applied
40%
Developmental
30%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
5021899200010%
5015010110010%
5011510202010%
7125010100010%
5117410202010%
5015010202010%
5017210200010%
7114099110010%
5035010200010%
5035010309010%
Goals / Objectives
Characterize multi-scale physical, chemical and biological properties of food, biological and engineered materials Develop new and sustainable technologies to transform raw materials into safe, high quality, health enhanced and value added foods through processing, packaging and preservation Develop mathematical models to understand, predict and optimize for safe and improved quality of foods, and to enhance consumer health Disseminate knowledge developed through research and novel pedagogical methods to enhance student and other stakeholder learning and practice
Project Methods
Objective 1: Characterize multi-scale physical, chemical and biological properties of food, biological and engineered materials: Pressure-assisted thermal processing and electro-based technologies are of interest because of their potential to deliver superior quality pasteurized and shelf-stable low-acid foods. Studies will take place to extend thermal properties measurement methods under elevated pressure and temperature conditions.Objective 2: Develop new and sustainable technologies to transform raw materials into safe, high quality, health enhanced and value added foods through processing, packaging and preservation:Maximum utilization of raw materials: Stations (IA, IL, OH) will collaborate to understand the impact of different pre-treatment steps such as washing, cleaning, sanitation and cooling of raw produce prior to further processing at industrial scale. Similarly collaborative efforts are being made to understand the impact of simple household techniques such as cutting, slicing, and juicing on nutritional stability of raw fruits and vegetables.Enhance process efficiency (energy, water). We will investigate energy and water utilization efficiency of different conventional and novel food processing technologies.Reduce environmental impact (package, process, waste stream). Characterization of food processing waste, and the development of their value-added applications as functional food ingredients and biodegradable packaging materials will be determined.Enhanced consumer health. The effectiveness of existing and novel technologies to enhance consumer health will be evaluated. The extent of over- and under-processing associated with the variability of the information available for the design of food formulations, processing technologies, packaging materials, storage conditions, and behavior of foods post-consumption will be determined.Reaction kinetics of various food constituents at combined pressure-heat treatment will be investigated.Ensure food safety, enhanced quality and stability. Multi state collaborative efforts will develop and apply advanced thermal and non-thermal based alternative processing technologies to ensure the safety, quality, and improve food stability. Technologies to be investigated include high pressure based technologies, ultrasound ozone, chlorine dioxide and nano-technology.Kinetics of destruction of various pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, enzymes, quality attributes, and nutrients as a function of different process variables (temperature, pressure, electric field, irradiation dosage among others), composition, pH and water activity will be investigated. Mechanistic understanding of attachment, growth and internalization of microorganisms in fresh produce. Mechanistic understanding of impact of different technologies on food safety and quality at molecular level will be studied. Application of high intensity ultrasound and irradiation for decontamination of fresh produce and sprouting seeds will be studied. Nano technology collaborative efforts will include material synthesis and fabrication, food-nano-system interactions, product development and food properties, food quality, targeting and controlled release of bioactive and antimicrobials, bioseparation, biosensing and bioconversion and nano-packaging.Enhanced consumer health. The effectiveness of existing and novel technologies will be investigated. Investigate the extent of over- and under processing associated with the variability of the information available for the design of food formulations, processing technologies, packaging materials, storage conditions, and behavior of foods post-consumption.Create new value added products. We will employ high pressure, nano-technology, radio frequency dielectric heating, laser and other novel processing and packaging technologies for developing new value-added products.Objective 3: Develop mathematical models to understand, predict and optimize for safe and improved quality of foods, and to enhance consumer health:Produce sanitization modeling will be collaboratively studied between OH and IA stations.Risk analysis of thermal processing alone or in combination with alternative technologies (UV, high pressure, etc.) from harvest to product consumption will be studied collaboratively.Objective 4: Disseminate knowledge developed through research and novel pedagogical methods to enhance student and other stakeholder learning and practice: See the Products section for a complete list of products, presentations, symposiums, educational methods/materials, and workshops that will result from this study.Existing educational tools and the modules developed in section above will be collected and a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) approach to assess their efficacy we be used. We will systematically and quantitatively develop assessment instruments in collaboration with experts in SoTL within the station. Through collaboration among stations, we will seek external funding (e.g., USDA) for development of these learning tools and assessment strategies. These efforts will be coordinated with the IFT Education and Outreach Division as well as with the Higher Education Review Board (HERB).Milestones for developing simulation modules into food safety education and educational videosDuring the first year, learning outcomes for courses will be coordinated and simulation modules and videos will be developed covering the common food physical properties such as thermal properties, dielectric properties, rheological properties. Assessment tools will be developed to obtain feedback on the use of these videos in food engineering and food science courses. During the second year, the modules will be implemented in the same stations in food science and food engineering course, and additional modules will be developed for additional properties. Formative and summative assessment will be performed that documents improvements in learning (includes student and faculty surveys). In the third and fourth years, the modules will be fine-tuned based on assessment from previous year and implemented in more stations with the assessment process repeated. This will lead to the development of a web-based course, and intregation of this material into existing and new courses. An education specialist will be working with the group to make the assessments of each module and course type.Approaches to be used and Milestones: 2015-2016: Meet at IFT 2015 at the Education SPA to Create the taskforce and identify a group to lead subparts of objectives 1-4) and develop assessment instruments. 2016-2017: Application and assessment of selected methods and tools in each objective, and in selected lectures and (in-class and online) courses (3-year replications); write proposal and submit to pertinent funding agencies; select three existing teaching strategies and method of online deployment to be tested according to section (b). 2017-2018: Develop grant proposals based upon the results from each objective; initial publications and symposiums developed. Select of 3 to 5 modules in objective 4 to deploy at other participating stations and assess student learning and perceptions. Initiate an additional 5 teaching modules. 2018-2019: Continue with grant applications, publications, and presentations. 2019-2020: Continue with national and international dissemination of results (collaborative publications, symposiums, conferences, assessments, educational tools) and impacts of accomplishments.

Progress 10/01/18 to 09/30/19

Outputs
Target Audience:* Undergraduate and graduate students in Food Science, Food Technology, and Food Engineering courses • The food industry (large and small processors) from farm to table, including processing, product development, food quality, food safety, and marketing. Both line and management personnel. • Extension and outreach personnel. • Government agencies (FDA, USDA AMS AND FSIS, NASA, DOD, Homeland Security, etc.) • Consumers (including all racial, ethnic, and economical groups) • National and global researchers and practitioners. • Trade Associations (State and national food organizations: Food Processors Association; Spice Trade Associations; analytical services, packaging etc.) Changes/Problems: Nothing Reported What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?Training of students (undergraduate and graduate) was through opportunities to plan and carry out research experiments, run analytical tests (chemical, processing, microbiological, quality) as they pertain to faculty projects. They also gave oral and poster presentations to professional and lay audiences, and learned to use pilot plant equipment. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?The outputs from these projects have been shared with 24 universities, the USDA at the annual NC-1023 , and scientific meetings and conferences over the project periods. The results from several of these projects were presented at several international, national, regional, and Iowa conferences and workshops, Engineering Food Safety and Quality annual meeting, Institute of Food Technologists, American Oil Chemists' Society, microbiology society etc. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?Work will continue with, studying food functional properties of legume proteins, rapid detection of pathogens, and with gel-based fat replacement in meat products. Pertinent faculty will continue participating in multi-institutional testing of valuable antioxidants from wine grape pomace saved from 2018 production of cabernet sauvignon variety. Method validation and extraction variation among the labs will be established. The Iowa Station will continue to collaborate with other stations.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? Objective 1... Characterize multi-scale physical, chemical and biological properties of food, biological and engineered materials Specific collaborative project on grape pomace antioxidant standardized extraction method for comparison across participating labs. Farmers growing herbs in 'high tunnels' and greenhouses had the flavor of their herbs improved as impacted by the appropriate wavelengths of LED lighting. Objective 2... Develop new and sustainable technologies to transform raw materials into safe, high quality, health enhanced and value added foods through processing, packaging and preservation Starch and legume protein resulted in stronger films when reinforced with nanofibers from cassava bagasse. Model emulsion when size-decreased to nanosize were more stable. Biosurfactants that were produced on soyhull microbially stabilized those emulsions and showed antimicrobial performance against escherichia coli o157:h7 and listeria monocytogenes. Mayonnaise prepared using frozen-thawed egg yolk treated with hydrolyzed egg yolk proteins was characterized, along with developing lecithin and stearic acid based oleogels and oleogel emulsions for edible applications. Magnetic ionic liquid were used to capture and salmonella spp. and escherichia coli o157: h7 as low-cost, portable and rapid detection of bacterial pathogens detection in foods and food-processing. Colorimetric detection of Escherichia coli using engineered bacteriophage and an affinity reporter system can lead to rapid detection of pathogens in food and water systems. Faculty participate in multi-institutional testing of valuable antioxidants from wine grape pomace, that is ongoing. Objective 3... Develop mathematical models to understand, predict and optimize for safe and improved quality of foods, and to enhance consumer health IA station members' work generally fell outside the purview of this Objectives. Objective 4... Disseminate knowledge developed through research and novel pedagogical methods to enhance student and other stakeholder learning and practice Surveys on students' attitude approach towards learning of food engineering and processing was carried out in-class and in focus groups across 6 participating universities.This is ongoing project, the findings of which will be shared with universities across US

Publications

  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Travalini, A.P., Lamsal, B.*, Magalh�es, W.L.E. and Demiate, I.M., 2019. Cassava starch films reinforced with lignocellulose nanofibers from cassava bagasse. International Journal of Biological Macromolecules. 139: 11511161
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Ren, K. and Lamsal, B.P.* Mendonca, A. 2019. Stability of Emulsions and Nanoemulsions Stabilized with Biosurfactants, and their Antimicrobial Performance Against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes, Tenside Surfactants Detergents, 56(5): 436-446.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Primacella M., Wang T., Acevedo N.C. 2019. Characterization of mayonnaise properties prepared using frozen-thawed egg yolk treated with hydrolyzed egg yolk proteins as anti-gelator. Food Hydrocolloids, 996, 529-536
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Gaudino N., Ghazanib S.M., Marangoni A., Clark S., Acevedo N.C. 2019. Development of lecithin and stearic acid based oleogels and oleogel emulsions for edible semisolid applications. Food Research International, 116, 79-89
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Litvin, A.G., Currey, C.J., and Wilson. L.A. 2019 (online) 2020 Hardcopy Journal). Effects of supplemental light source on basil, dill, and parsley growth, morphology, aroma, and flavor. . J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 145:18-29. (https://doi.org/10.21273/JASHSO4726-19).
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Novel approaches to the low-cost, portable and rapid detection of bacterial pathogens in foods and food-processing environments
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Singh, S., Hinkley, T., Nugen, S.R. and Talbert, J.N., 2019. Colorimetric detection of Escherichia coli using engineered bacteriophage and an affinity reporter system. Analytical and bioanalytical chemistry, 411(27), pp.7273-7279.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Wang, D., Hinkley, T., Chen, J., Talbert, J.N. and Nugen, S.R., 2019. Phage based electrochemical detection of Escherichia coli in drinking water using affinity reporter probes. Analyst, 144(4), pp.1345-1352
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Hice, S., Wijeratne, S., Talbert, J. and Brehm-Stecher, B., 2019, July. Evaluation of a Commercial Enzymatic Drain Cleaner for Food Matrix Digestion. In IAFP 2019 Annual Meeting. IAFP
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Bollom* M., Clark S., Acevedo N.C. Development and characterization of novel bigel system in dairy foods. 2019 American Dairy Science Association (ADSA) Annual Meeting. Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. June 23-26, 2019.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Acevedo N.C., Sebranek J.G., Prusa K.J., Dickson J.S., Tart�* R., Utilization of conventional and high oleic soybean oil oleogels structured with rice bran wax to replace pork fat in mechanically separated chicken-based bologna sausage. Paulus J.S., 73st Reciprocal Meat Conference. Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. June 23-26, 2019
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Wilson, L. Food Grade Soybeans and Food Safety. Seed Technology Conferences. Iowa State University. 2019.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2019 Citation: Talbert, A.J., Graves, W. R., Wilson, L.A., Boylston, T. Horticulture Retreat (Floral Aromatics of Ptelea: Chemical Identification and Human Response, 2019.


Progress 10/01/17 to 09/30/18

Outputs
Target Audience: The food industry (large and small processors) from farm to table, including processing, product development, food quality, food safety, and marketing. Both line and management personnel. Extension and outreach personnel. Government agencies (FDA, USDA AMS AND FSIS, NASA, DOD, Homeland Security, etc.) Consumers (including all racial, ethnic, and economical groups) National and global researchers and practitioners. Trade Associations (State and national food organizations: Food Processors Association; Spice Trade Associations; analytical services, packaging etc.) Undergraduate and graduate students in Food Science, Food Technology, and Food Engineering courses Changes/Problems: Nothing Reported What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?Training of students (undergraduate and graduate) to run analytical tests (chemical, microbiological, quality) as they pertain to faculty projects. They also gave oral and poster presentations to professional and lay audiences, and learned to use pilot plant equipment. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?The outputs from these projects have been shared with 24 universities, NASA, and the USDA at the annual NC-1023 meetings over the project periods. The results from several of these projects were presented at several international, national, regional, and Iowa conferences and workshops, for example, Impacts of Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) and Post-harvest Handling Practices Certificate Training for Producers; On-Farm Food Safety Behaviors and Perceptions' of Customer Assurance; Engineering Food Safety and Quality annual meeting; Frozen Fruit and Vegetable conference; Midwest Aronia Berry Association (FSMA regulations, jam and jelly standards) and Institute of Food Technologists. Extension bulletins were being created in regards to the Aronia berry jams and jellies, and optimum harvest times. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?Some faculty will participate in multi-institutional testing of valuable antioxidants from wine grape pomace saved from 2018 production of cabernet sauvignon variety. Method validation and extraction variation among the labs will be established. Work will continue with rapid detection of pathogens, and with nanoencapsulation and delivery of nutraceuticals. The Iowa Station will continue to collaborate with other stations.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? Overall impact statement: NC1023 Iowa station members' work over the project period has improved the quality and nutrition of food products, by making better characterization of food and other biological materials, and by adding value to food and coproducts through processing and reducing food waste. Measuring rheological properties of concentrated food, measuring physico-chemical properties of soy products, extracting antioxidants from berries, developing value-added natural antimicrobial systems and their nano-material based efficient delivery, extrusion-based modification of milk protein concentrates to reduce hardening of high-protein nutrition bars, better detection of Salmonella using Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA), phage-based assay for the rapid, quantitative, and single cell visualization of E. coli are some work that have impacted the foods grown in Iowa, ways to process them safely, and utilize them completely. Consumers expect to have a safe high quality food supply. The outputs and impact of these projects have helped farmers, producers, processors, suppliers, current and future food industry scholars, and professionals to better understand how to deliver safe, high quality food to consumers. Objective 1... Characterize multi-scale physical, chemical and biological properties of food, biological and engineered materials Using data previously collected from Iowa and other stations, it was possible to collaborate with the FDA, and other agencies to create and validate recipes for Aronia jams and jellies that met the FDA standards for identity (regarding degree brix, water activity, and pH). The results from our study to determine the optimum harvest dates for Aronia berries is being applied in the field. Specific collaborative project accurately measured rheological properties of concentrated food. Objective 2... Develop new and sustainable technologies to transform raw materials into safe, high quality, health enhanced and value added foods through processing, packaging and preservation One of the solar food driers has been built and shipped to Africa by an entrepreneur to reduce postharvest food losses and determined quality of dried products. Developing methods for Rapid detection of pathogens in food and water systems can be used to reduce foodborne outbreaks Industry is evaluating extrusion-based process of milk protein concentrate for producing high protein nutrition bars. Determination of influence of wavelength of lights on quality (aroma and flavors) of herbs has been presented to farmers and LED manufacturer. Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable engineered nanomaterial-enabled delivery of antimicrobials and antioxidants compounds will result in efficient, safer, and healthier food products. Objective 3... Develop mathematical models to understand, predict and optimize for safe and improved quality of foods, and to enhance consumer health IA station members' work generally fell outside the purview of this Objective Objective 4... Disseminate knowledge developed through research and novel pedagogical methods to enhance student and other stakeholder learning and practice The Iowa station provided data and pedagogical methods for inclusion in a document to enhance student and other stakeholder learning and practice. Michigan Station leading this project. Iowa station contributed pedagogical methods/ syllabus to enhance students' and instructors' learning and best practice in food engineering and processing.

Publications

  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Banach, J.C., Clark, S. and Lamsal, B.P., 2018. Extrusion modifies some physicochemical properties of milk protein concentrate for improved performance in high-protein nutrition bars, Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 98: 391-399.
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Wilson, LA, Beekman TL. 2018. Optimal Aronia Berry Harvest. Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. FS 29: 1-4.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Wang, F., Mendon�a, A., Brehm-Stecher, B.F., Dickson, J., DiSpirito, A., Shaw, A. and Thomas-Popo, E., 2018. Long-Term Survival Phase Cells of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 Have Significantly Greater Resistance to Ultraviolet Radiation in 0.85% Saline and Apple Juice. Foodborne pathogens and disease, 15(9): 538-543
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Hinkley, T.C., Singh, S., Garing, S., Le Ny, A.L.M., Nichols, K.P., Peters, J.E., Talbert, J.N. and Nugen, S.R., 2018. A phage-based assay for the rapid, quantitative, and single CFU visualization of E. coli (ECOR# 13) in drinking water. Scientific reports, 8(1): 14630.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Hinkley, T.C., Garing, S., Singh, S., Le Ny, A.M., Nichols, K.P., Peters, J.E., Talbert, J.N. and Nugen, S.R., 2018. Reporter bacteriophage T7 NLC utilizes a novel NanoLuc:: CBM fusion for the ultrasensitive detection of Escherichia coli in water. Analyst, 143(17):4074-4082
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Ozdemir, N., Pola, C. C., Teixeira, B. N., Hill, L. E., Bayrak, A., Gomes, C. 2018. Preparation of black pepper oleoresin inclusion complexes based on beta-cyclodextrin for antioxidant and antimicrobial delivery applications using kneading and freeze drying methods: a comparative study. LWT-Food Science. 91:439-445
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Pereira, M. C., Oliveira, D. A., Hill, L. E., Zambiazi, R. C., Borges, C. D., Vizzotto, M., Mertens-Talcott, S., Talcott, S., Gomes, C. 2018. Effect of nanoencapsulation using PLGA on antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of guabiroba fruit phenolic extract. Food Chemistry. 240: 396-404.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Brehm-Stecher, B.F. Applications of Natural Antimicrobials in Foods: Strategies for Overcoming Current Challenges, International Association for Food Protection European Symposium in Stockholm, Sweden, April 26, 2018
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Brehm-Stecher, B.F., Advances in Pre-Analytical Sample Preparation: Unclogging The Bottleneck from Sample to Answer, Keynote talk, 20th International Symposium on Extraction Technologies (ExTech), Ames, IA, June 18, 2018
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Hice, S.A., Clark, K.D., Anderson, J.A., Brehm-Stecher, B.F., Rapid Pre-Concentration & Detection of Salmonella Using Magnetic Ionic Liquids & Recombinase Polymerase Amplification, 20th International Symposium on Extraction Technologies (ExTech), Ames, IA, June 20, 2018
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Zha, Y., Pola, C., Martinez, A., Summerlin, T., Johnson, J., Althawab, S., Oliveira, D., Pant, S., Gomes, C. L. 2018. Encapsulation of Chinese plant extracts using hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin and chitosan for antibacterial delivery applications. Conference of Food Engineering (CoFE) 2018, Minneapolis, MN, Sept. 10-12, 2018.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: CoNFoMA 2018: convergence of (nano)technology and food manufacturing: future of food and the role of technology  Minneapolis, MN  Sept. 8 and 9, 2018
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Brehm-Stecher, B.F., Bhunia, A.K., B5th Annual Conference on Rapid Detection for Food Safety in Bethesda, MD, Advances in Genomics, Capture Technologies & High Throughput Detection, June 27  28, 2018
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Mendonca, A.M., Jackson-Davis, A., Brehm-Stecher, B.F. Natural Antimicrobial Preservatives in Foods: Where are We in Terms of Application and Commercialization?, International Association for Food Protection European Symposium in Stockholm, Sweden, April 26, 2018
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Midwest Aronia Association Update on Federal Jam and Jelly: FDA Regulations. Omaha, NE. March 26, 2017
  • Type: Other Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Midwest Aronia Association Update on Food safety Regulations (FSMA) Omaha, NE. March 26, 2017


Progress 10/01/16 to 09/30/17

Outputs
Target Audience: Undergraduate and graduate students in Food Science, Food Technology, and Food Engineering courses (formal and informal programming, practical hands-on experiences, innovative teaching/learning methodologies). The food industry (large and small processors) from farm to table, including processing, product development, food quality, food safety, and marketing. Both line and management personnel. Workshops, videos, Webinars, site programming, will be used. Extension and outreach personnel. Government agencies (FDA, USDA AMS AND FSIS, NASA, DOD, Homeland Security, etc.) Consumers (including all racial, ethnic, and economical groups) National and global researchers and practitioners. Trade Associations (State and national food organizations: Food Processors Association; Spice Trade Associations;analytical services, packaging etc.) Changes/Problems: Nothing Reported What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?Training of students (undergraduate and graduate) to run analytical tests (chemical, microbiological, quality). They also gave oral and poster presentations to professional and lay audiences, and learned to use pilot plant equipment. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?The outputs from these projects have been shared with 24 universities, NASA, and the USDA at the annual NC-1023 meeting. The results from several of these projects were presented at several international, national, regional, and Iowa conferences and workshops: Impacts of Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) and Post-harvest Handling Practices Certificate Training for Producers; On-Farm Food Safety Behaviors and Perceptions' of Customer Assurance; Engineering Food Safety and Quality annual meeting; Frozen Fruit and Vegetable conference; Midwest Aronia Berry Association (FSMA regulations, jam and jelly standards) and Institute of Food Technologists. Extension bulletins are being created in regards to the Aronia berry jams and jellies, and optimum harvest times. This will allow farmers and producers know when to harvest for optimum composition (pigment, antioxidants, flavor) and how to label those products to sell legally. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?Work will be continued with the Aronia jams and jellies, dried mango, microwavable popcorn, pulse recipes with low-glycemic indexes for Type II Diabetics, and shelf life determinations for products. The Iowa Station will continue to collaborate with other stations and the Iowa Department of Inspection and Appeals.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? IMPACT:Consumers expect to have a safe, high-quality food supply. The outputs and impact of these projects have helped farmers, producers, processors, suppliers, current and future food industry scholars, and professionals to better understand how to deliver safe, high quality food to consumers. The data collected from fruit (mango) dried in a new solar-dryer, made with local global materials, can be used to help increase the shelf life, reduce food loss/waste and made the food supply safer in less-developed countries. Work to create a Standards of Identity for Aronia Berry jams and jellies, has a positive impact on the Aronia berry industry in the US. We worked to create new microwavable popcorn flavorings that have harmful chemicals eliminated from them, while still being appealing to consumers. Another project has developed new recipes using different pulses cultivars for those with Type II Diabetes in an effort to reduce the glycemic index through the utilization of pulses. (Pulses are part of the legume family.) Obj 1.Characterize multi-scale physical, chemical and biological properties of food, biological and engineered materials. Using data previously collected from Iowa and other stations, it was possible to collaborate with the FDA, and other agencies to create and validate recipes for Aronia jams and jellies that met the FDA standards for identity (regarding degree brix, water activity, and pH). As it is very difficult and takes a long time to change FDA Standards of Identity to include aronia jams and jellies in the list of standard fruits that can be used, FDA agreed to let jams and jellies made with aronia berries to be recognized as long as they are listed as alternative fruit. The results from our study to determine the optimum harvest dates for Aronia berries is being applied in the field. Obj 2.Develop new and sustainable technologies to transform raw materials into safe, high quality, health enhanced and value added foods through processing, packaging and preservation. High temperature and humidity in other countries along with the lack of electricity in more rural places can and has lead to food spoilage and food shortage. The high temperature, moisture, and poor storage do not allow for food to be stored for a long period of time without experiencing potentially dangerous microbial growth, decreasing nutritional value and postharvest spoilage. The lack of electricity greatly decreases the number of food storage options to prevent these food detoration (i.e. refrigerators). A solar-powered dryer can help to reduce the amount of food lost while keeping the food preserved. The solar-drier made from local materials, greatly benefits the local village population. Type II Diabetics require their diet to contain foods that have low-glycemic indexes. Recipes featuring different types of pulses have been developed and will be tested to determine if their low-glycemic indexes can benefit Type II Diabetics. A project regarding various microwavable popcorn products is in progress to attempt and remove certain undesirable chemicals from the popcorn flavorings, while still being able to withstand the high temperatures of the microwave without flashing off. Obj 3 Nothing to report. Obj 4. Disseminate knowledge developed through research and novel pedagogical methods to enhance student and other stakeholder learning and practice. The Iowa station provided data and pedagogical methods for inclusion in a document to enhance student and other stakeholder learning and practice (Michigan Station leading this project).

Publications

  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Ramirez-Gomez NO, Acevedo NC, Toro-Vasquez JF, Ornelas-Paz JJ, Dibildoz-Alvarado E. 2016. Phase behavior, structure and rheology of candelilla wax/fully hydrogenated soybean oil mixture with and without vegetable oil. Food Research International 89:828-837.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Xiang C., Acevedo N.C. 2017. In situ self-assembled nanocomposites from bacterial cellulose reinforced with electrospun poly(lactic acid)/lipids nanofibers. Polymers, 9, 179; DOI: 10.3390/polym9050179
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Yoshikawa H.Y., Pink D., Acevedo N.C., Peyronel F., Marangoni A.G., Tanaka M. 2017. Mechanical response of single triacyglycerol spherulites by using microcolloidal probes. Chemistry Letters 46(4): 599-601
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Acevedo N.C., MacMillan B.B., Newling B., Marangoni A.G. 2017. The effect of shear on the diffusive movement of oil in fats. RCS Advances. 7:1634-1642.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Ramel P., Co E., Acevedo N.C., Marangoni A.G. 2016. Structure and Functionality of Nanostructured Triacyglycerol Crystal Networks. Progress in Lipid Research, 64:231-242.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Wilson, L. A. Food Safety. (Presentation). Midwest Aronia Association, La Vista, NE. March 25.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Wilson, L. A. Standards of Identity for Aronia Jams and Jellies. (Presentation). Midwest Aronia Association, La Vista, NE. March 25.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Wilson LA, Fruit Quality and Standards. (Presentation). Iowa State University Extension Workshop. Ames, IA. Jan. 20.


Progress 10/01/15 to 09/30/16

Outputs
Target Audience: Undergraduate and graduate students in Food Science, Food Technology, and Food Engineering courses (formal and informal programming, practical hands-on experiences, innovative teaching/learning methodologies). The food industry (large and small processors) from farm to table, including processing, product development, food quality, food safety, and marketing. Both line and management personnel. Workshops, videos, Webinars, site programming, will be used. Extension and outreach personnel. Government agencies (FDA, USDA AMS AND FSIS, NASA, DOD, Homeland Security, etc.) Consumers (including all racial, ethnic, and economical groups) National and global researchers and practitioners. Trade Associations (State and national food organizations: Food Processors Association; Spice Trade Associations; analytical services, packaging etc.). Changes/Problems: Nothing Reported What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?Training of students (undergraduate and graduate) to run analytical tests (chemical, microbiological, quality). They also learned how to talk about their science by giving oral and poster presentations to professional and lay audiences. They learned to use pilot plant equipment. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?The outputs from this project have been shared with 24 universities, NASA, and the USDA at the annual NC-1023 meeting. The results from several of these projects were presented at several international, national, regional, and Iowa conferences and workshops: Impacts of Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) and Post-harvest Handling Practices Certificate Training for Producers; On-Farm Food Safety Behaviors and Perceptions' of Customer Assurance; Engineering Food Safety and Quality annual meeting; Frozen Fruit and Vegetable conference; Midwest Aronia Berry Association and Institute of Food Technologists; Aronia Berry Field Days presentations on the farm for farmers and small processors. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?Work will continue with Aronia Berries, high protein protein bars, rapid microbial testing methods, packaging material, the influence of wavelengths of light on their aroma and flavor or herb, full scale-up of the osmotic dehydrator for use by farmers and cultures in other counties.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? IMPACT: Consumers expect to have a safe high quality food supply. The outputs and impacts of this project have helped farmers, producers, processors, suppliers, current and future food industry scholars, and professionals to better understand how to deliver safe, high quality food to consumers. For example, a variety of techniques to reduce the microbial loads on fresh produce were studied and the results were shared with producers, processors, students and others in the food science community. Another example includes the work to identify the optimum time to harvest Aronia Berries and to create a Standards of Identity for Aronia Berry jams and jellies. Both of these research results have favorably impacted the Aronia Barry industry and allowed U.S. Aronia farmers to compete with higher quality products against imported Aronia concentrates from Eastern Europe. Objective 1... Characterize multi-scale physical, chemical and biological properties of food, biological and engineered materials. Long-term storage of irradiated and non-irradiated rennet and Low Heat Treated Dried Milk, found that an unopened container of rennet always had more activity than the rennet that was opened and resealed. Likewise, 5-Gry treated rennet had less activity than the control rennet. Aronia jams and jellies standard of identity for FDA was developed with recipe standardization to meet the FDA standard of identity and their requirements for degree brix, water activity and pH. Two new granola products were tested for shelf life stability by analyzing the color aroma, and water activity. Both short term high temperature simulated online shipping, and longer term storage at room temperature showed that the high barrier package protected the granola from water uptake and oxidation. There was no change in quality or safety concerns. The Spotted Winged Drosophila has recently been found to infect berries with its larvae which can ruin the harvest. The project across multiple states and involves developing recipes for farmers markets, restaurants and grocery stores. Recipes that are made are then tested for quality, shelf life and microbial factors (within GMP-DALs). Baking applications displayed the most promising results. As only minor differences in aroma, color, and texture were found. Objective 2. Develop new and sustainable technologies to transform raw materials into safe, high quality, health enhanced and value added foods through processing, packaging and preservation. Sensory evaluation, by a trained panel, of model high-protein nutrition bars formulated at 30 % protein with extrusion-processed milk protein concentrate (80%, MPC80) was carried out during accelerated storage at three temperatures. Effect of MPC80 particle size reduction via jet-milling on instrumental and sensory texture of 30% protein nutrition bar shows promise. A process was developed to produce Sweetened dried Aronia Berries utilizing osmotic and heat drying. Bench-top and mini-scale-up processes produced safe, healthy, high quality sweeten dried berrie (below 0.6 water activity, and a colored sweetened byproduct for food use. Objective 3... Develop mathematical models to understand, predict and optimize for safe and improved quality of foods, and to enhance consumer health. For Aronia berry harvest, the optimal harvest date for Aronia berries was best determined by using. Brix, Brix/acid ratio, soil moisture (VSM), and total polyphenol content. The berry and juice colors weren't good parameters for following the maturation of Aronia berries. Correlations between Aronia berry characteristics and weather conditions were found. This has permitted the estimation of the optimal harvest dates for farmers. Objective 4... Disseminate knowledge developed through research and novel pedagogical methods to enhance student and other stakeholder learning and practice. Results of the research have been used in food science classes to demonstrate the application of knowledge and research findings to real world problems.

Publications

  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Acevedo NC, Franchetty D. 2016. Analysis of co-crystallized free phytosterols with triacylglycerols as a functional food ingredient. Food Research International 85:104-112.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Agudelo-Laverde LM, Acevedo NC, Schebor C, Buera MP. 2016. Opacity studies in dehydrated fruits in relation to proton mobility and supramolecular aspects. Food Bioprocess Technology 9(10): 1674-1680.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Au C, Wang T, Acevedo NC. 2016. Development of a low resolution 1H NMR spectroscopic technique for the study of hen egg yolk gelation. Food Chemistry 204:159-166.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Banach, J.C., Clark, S., and Lamsal, B.P.* 2016. Textural performance of crosslinked or reduced-calcium milk protein ingredients in model high-protein nutrition bars, Journal of Dairy Science, 99:60616070.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Banach, J.C., Clark, S., and Lamsal, B.P.* 2016. Instrumental and Sensory Texture Attributes of High-protein Nutrition Bars Formulated with Extruded Milk Protein Concentrate, Journal of Food Science, 81(5): S1254-S1262.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Awaiting Publication Year Published: 2016 Citation: Ram�rez-G�mez NO, Acevedo NC, Toro-Vazquez JF, Ornelas-Paz JJ, Dibildox-Alvarado E. 2016. Phase behavior, structure and rheology of candelilla wax/fully hydrogenated soybean oil mixtures with and without vegetable oil. Food Research International. (Forthcoming).
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Yakubu A, Wilson LA, Bern CJ, Brumm TJ. 2016. Use of recycled containers for hermetic maize storage in East Africa. Journal of Stored Products and Postharvest Research. 7(6):53-60.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Acevedo NC, Marangoni AG. 2015. Nanostructured fat crystal systems. Annual Review of Food Science and Technology 6:3.1-3.26.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Au C, Acevedo NC, Wang T. 2015. Determination of the gelation mechanism of freeze-thawed hen egg yolk. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 63(46):10170-10180.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Shaw A, Strohbehn C, Naeve L, Domoto P, Wilson, L. 2015. Current trends in food safety practices for small growers in the Midwest. Food Protection Trends 35(6):461-469.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Shaw A, Strohbehn C, Naeve L, Domoto P, Wilson, L. 2015. Knowledge gained from good agricultural practices courses for Iowa growers. Journal of Extension 53(5).
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Shaw A, Strohbehn C, Naeve L, Domoto P, Wilson, L. 2015. Systematic Approach to Food Safety Education on the Farm. Journal of Extension 53(6).
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Banach, J.C., Clark, S., and Lamsal, B.P.* 2016. Microstructural Changes in Model High-protein Nutrition Bars Formulated with Modified Milk Protein Concentrates, Journal of Food Science, 81 (2): C332-C340.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Nguyen Z, Acevedo N C. 2015.Effect of cooling rate on the properties of phytosterol enriched edible oleogels. World Congress On Oils And Fats & 31st ISF Lectureship Series. Rosario, Argentina. October 31- November 4.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Accepted Year Published: 2016 Citation: Eckert CK, Wilson L, Barnum G, Beekman TL, Calvert V, Montalban A, Schaumburg J, Perchonok M. 2016. Time and Radiation Effects on Cheese Production during Long-Term NASA Space Missions. National IFT meeting. Chicago Ill. July 16-18.
  • Type: Book Chapters Status: Awaiting Publication Year Published: 2016 Citation: Peyronel F, Acevedo NC, Pink DA, Marangoni AG. 2016. Supramolecular assembly of fat crystal networks from the nanoscale to the mesoscale. In: Sato K, editor. Crystallization of Lipids. Wiley-Blackwell. (Forthcoming).
  • Type: Book Chapters Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Agudelo M L, Acevedo NC, Schebor C, Buera MP. 2015. Effect of Relative Humidity on Shrinkage and Color Changes in Dehydrated Strawberry. In: Water Stress in Biological, Chemical, Pharmaceutical and Food Systems. Part of the series Food Engineering Series. Springer. p 469-476.
  • Type: Book Chapters Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Sullivan C, Acevedo NC, Peyronel F, Marangoni, AG. 2015. Fat Nanostructure. In: Marangoni AG, Pink D, editors. Edible Nanostructures: A Bottom-up Approach. The Royal Society of Chemistry. UK: Cambridge. p 6-37.