Source: UNIVERSITY OF MAINE submitted to
ICOOK: A 4-H PROGRAM TO PROMOTE CULINARY SKILLS AND FAMILY MEALS FOR OBESITY PREVENTION
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0228718
Grant No.
2012-68001-19605
Project No.
ME0-2011-04536
Proposal No.
2014-07139
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
A2101
Project Start Date
Aug 1, 2012
Project End Date
Jul 31, 2018
Grant Year
2016
Project Director
White, A.
Recipient Organization
UNIVERSITY OF MAINE
(N/A)
ORONO,ME 04469
Performing Department
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Non Technical Summary
The 4-H approach to "learn by doing" is at the heart of this project. Youth, 9-10 years old, will learn the importance of a healthful lifestyle by doing activities that contribute to good health. Through the iCook 4-H program youth will collaborate with their primary meal preparer to develop cooking skills and increase and enhance family mealtimes and physical activity. Culinary skills and physical activity of youth will be increased to help prevent childhood obesity. Childhood obesity, a critical public health concern, is a multifactorial problem. In 2008, 19.6% of children 6-11 years old were obese. Researchers have identified lack of parental education in nutrition, sedentary lifestyles, availability of high-caloric foods, and scarcity of healthful foods as contributing to the obesity crisis. Decreased frequency of family meals has been associated with low socioeconomic status and overweight in youth. The 2010 White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity emphasized that solutions for the next generation will result from educating children on nutrition and healthful living. The iCook 4-H program is a 5-state partnership among researchers and Extension faculty who will use a community-based participatory approach to reduce childhood obesity in rural, low-income populations. The objective is to test whether a 24-month intervention, based on building foundational skills for culinary proficiency and increasing family meals and physical activity, can positively impact the body mass index of youth compared to a control condition. The project will include youth-adult dyads cooking and being physically active together. 4-H curricula, Fast Foods and Youth in Motion, will be modified for iCook. To add interest and enthusiasm, youth will use a website developed for the study to share short videos to demonstrate their learning at home. The website will be an interactive format for personalized and customized learning through information sharing, blogging, chatting, goal setting and tracking progress. Family dyads (n=500) will be recruited, randomized into control and treatment groups, and assessed at 0, 4, 12, and 24 months. Outcome measures for youth include physical measurements, 3-day activity records, diet quality, cooking skills, family meal characteristics, and quality of life. Accelerometer data will be gathered on 25% of youth. Outcome measures for adults include kitchen proficiency, attitudes and practices on child feeding and obesity proneness, family mealtime characteristics and quality of life. The intervention program includes 6, two-hour sessions for the dyads in the first year, followed in the second and third year with continuous website activity. iCook will be tested for dissemination and sustainability during the fourth year of the grant with 120 family dyads. Evaluation tools will be developed to accompany iCook to assess program effectiveness. The intervention is reciprocal in nature with dyads modeling behavior for each other to build foundational skills for healthful lifestyles for obesity prevention.
Animal Health Component
(N/A)
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
90%
Developmental
10%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
70360203020100%
Knowledge Area
703 - Nutrition Education and Behavior;

Subject Of Investigation
6020 - The family and its members;

Field Of Science
3020 - Education;
Goals / Objectives
The goal of the 5-year project is to increase culinary competence, family meal times and physical activity of youth to help prevent childhood obesity using a community-based participatory research approach through the integration of research and extension via 4-H programming. The objective is to determine whether a 24-month intervention, based on building foundational skills for competence in culinary skills, family meal times, and physical activity, can positively impact the body mass index (BMI) z scores of children compared to a control condition. Specifically for year 1, the objectives are to: develop/modify research materials including curriculum, website, and evaluation tools; pilot test the iCook intervention; establish inter and intra state steering committees to provide research guidance and decision-making; and establish the infrastructure, including protocols and training, for study implementation. Outputs include a study website and curriculum ready for testing with priority population.
Project Methods
This study is a control/treatment intervention design with assessments at 0, 4, 12, and 24 months. Family dyads of 9-10 year old youth and the adult who is the main food preparer (n=500 dyads) will be recruited. Assessments over two years will allow for monitoring of weight and behavioral characteristics during a period of preadolescence and to identify sustained behavior change. Principal investigators from five states with their Cooperative Extension/4-H and community partners will work together, using the community based participatory research approach to design, deliver and evaluate the iCook 4-H Program to reduce childhood obesity. The program is a non-diet approach to weight management for youth. Healthy weight status will be achieved by improved dietary intake, family meal times, and increased physical activity. Extension personnel are familiar with citizens and communities in the state and have relationships with community stakeholders, therefore the Extension specialist in each state will choose the counties to deliver the intervention considering the priority populations. Recruitment efforts will focus on rural, diverse, low-income populations,who are recipients of SNAP. Recruitment will occur in such places as schools with at least 50% students eligible for free or reduced price lunch. Youth will be randomized into control and treatment groups and assessed for physical measurements and complete questionnaires on dietary quality, physical activity, cooking skills; eating habits; characteristics of meal times; and quality of life. Accelerometer measures will be collected on 25% of the youth. Adults will complete questionnaires about kitchen proficiency; child feeding practices and obesity proneness; rating of child cooking skills; characteristics of family meals; quality of life, self-reported height and weight and demographics. The 4-H curricula, Fast Foods and YOUth in Motion, both developed in Nebraska, will be modified for use in the intervention. To add interest and enthusiasm, youth will be given mini video recorders to create and share, on a secure study website, short clips they develop at home to demonstrate their learning around cooking, physical activity and family meals. The website will be developed specifically for the study in an interactive format to provide a community for information sharing, chatting, goal setting and tracking progress. Family dyads will participate in six, 2-hour sessions, delivered over three months, designed to develop culinary skills, engage youth in meal planning and preparation, increase and enhance family meal times, improve quality of dietary intake, and increase physical activity. Reciprocal role modeling to build skills and self-efficacy will occur during the sessions and at home. Process evaluation will occur on an ongoing basis for quality improvement. Program evaluation tools, developed during the first year, will be refined throughout the remaining years. During year 4 of the study, the program will be tested for dissemination and sustainability.

Progress 08/01/12 to 07/31/18

Outputs
Target Audience: 2013 Pilot Intervention. The participants were dyads (n=48) composed of 9-10 year old youth and their adult primary meal preparer who participated in the iCook 4-H pilot. Youth (female=72%, male=28%; mean age 9.7 years) were 47% white, 18% Hispanic, 13% black, 13% Native American, 2% Asian, and 7% other. Of the adults, 70% were married and 84% had at least some college education. 2013-2015 Intervention Study. At 0 month, 228 dyads (control n=77, treatment n=151) completed assessments. Overall, youth (mean age=9.35 [.67] years) were 55% female, 68% white. Diversity was represented by 14% Hispanic and 12% Black. Adults were 75% female (mean age 38[5]) and of the 25% males, they were older (mean age 43 [11]). Adults were 68% white,75% married, and 36% were on government assistance programs. 2015 Pilot Dissemination. Participants were 27 dyads from the three participating states of Maine, Nebraska, and Tennessee. Youth, mean age 10 (.91) years, were 66% female. Adults, mean age 42 (8.9) years, were 89% female. The majority were married (89%), employed (72%) and held a degree in higher education (75%). 2015 Dissemination Study, at 0 month, 74 dyads (control = 39, treatment = 35) completed program outcome evaluations. Overall, youth (mean age=9.6 [.78] years) were 96% female and 68% white. Adults had a mean age of 39 (6.6) years old with mean BMI=26 (6), 77% were married, 70% had post high school degrees, and 63% were employed. Of the 26% who were on government assistance programs, more were in the treatment than control group (P=.004). Changes/Problems: Nothing Reported What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?Year 1, 2012-13 University of Maine doctoral student participated in two days of professional development using Drupal, an open source content management platform for building websites. He used that information and worked with a website consulting firm to develop the study website. Year 2, 2013-14 Researchers were trained on use of accelerometers and digital equipment to assess blood pressure. Year 3, 2014-15 1) Researchers were trained in youth development as part of the focus on "teens as teachers" for the Dissemination Study. Trainers were Jennifer Lobley, Maine Statewide Extension Educator for Volunteer Development and Michelle Krehbiel, Youth Development Specialist University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension. 2) West Virginia researchers trained high school students to be "teens as teachers" and lead the iCook 4-H program through the Health Science Technology Academy (HSTA), a program for high school students to participate in research in STEM areas. This teen-led approach could serve as a model for youth health-related programming. 2) Researchers were trained in use of Ripple Effect Mapping, a qualitative method to identify project impact on participants, families and communities. Barbara Baker, 4-H Youth Development Educator was the trainer. 3) Melissa Olfert, co-PI, trained researchers on eB4CAST, a model to collect forecasting and footprinting data to improve adoption and sustainability of the iCook 4-H program. 4. Lisa Franzen-Castle, co-PI, trained researchers and program leaders on curriculum implementation. Short online training modules were developed. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest? Over the 6 years, results have been disseminated in local, state, national and international locations. Year 1, 2012-13 5 abstracts were presented at Experimental Biology/American Society for Nutrition. Year 2, 2013-14 8 abstracts were presented at annual meetings for the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior, Experimental Biology/American Society for Nutrition, and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Presentations were made at the National Afterschool Association Convention and the Asia-Pacific Academic Consortium for Public Health, Wuhan, China. Year 3: 2014-15. 11 abstracts were presented at annual meeting for the Society of Nutrition Education and Behavior. Year 4, 2015-16 9 abstracts were presented at the annual meeting for Society of Nutrition Education and Behavior Display booth at the National Institute of Food and Agriculature, USA Science and Engineering Festival in Washington, DC, where 35,000 young people from across the nation came for presentations and exhibits designed to encourage STEM careers.Two presentations were made at the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Science Annual Session. Year 5, 2016-17 7 abstracts presented at annual meetings at the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior, Experimental Biology/American Society of Nutrition (ASN), and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Presentation made at China Medical University in Taichung, Taiwan. Year 6, 2017-18 5 abstracts presented at annual meeting for Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior; Experimental Biology/American Society of Nutrition (ASN). Presentation made at the Society for Public Health Education. 19 manuscripts have been developed, 2 are in review, 7 accepted for publications, and 10 published. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals? Nothing Reported

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? Year 1, 2012-13 1) A six, 2-hour session curriculum was developed as the central component of the iCook intervention. The 5-state team adapted two 4-H curricula, Fast Foods and Youth in Motion, added resources to include food safety, family mealtime and MyPlate, and grounded the curriculum in the Social Cognitive Theory and the experiential 4-H learning model. It was packaged into leader and participant binders and included guides, handouts, activities and recipes for each session. 2) The website for the iCook 4-H project was developed using Drupal 7 as a content management system. 3) Community-based participatory research established through inter and intra state steering committees to provide research guidance and decision-making. 4) Initial work began on the Program Evaluation instruments. Year 2, 2013-14. Program evaluation instruments were developed, including the Program Outcome Measures, Process Evaluation, and Fidelity of Implementation. Intervention Study was conducted and assessments at 0 and 4 months were collected. Year 3, 2014-15 1) The 12-month assessments for the Intervention Study were conducted. 2) iCook 4-H Program was disseminated through the Heath Science Technology Academy (HSTA) in West Virginia. HSTA is a STEM (science, technology, education and mathematics) based research program for underrepresented high school students. 3) The iCook 4-H curriculum modifications were made from a 6-session to an 8-session program in preparation for movement from a research to practice environment. Year 4, 2015-16 The Dissemination Study was conducted, with minimal researcher involvement to test for evidence of sustainability in the practice environment. Final assessments at 24 months were conducted in the Intervention Study. Year 5, 2016-17 Data analyses were conducted with focus on development of manuscripts. Year 6. 2017-18 The 6th year was a no-cost extension with the focus on expanding the impact of the iCook 4-H program through diversification. 1) The 8, 2-hour session curriculum was finalized. It is composed of skill-based family activities in cooking, eating, and playing together for health promotion. The curriculum was reviewed and approved by the National 4-H Council. 2) New family play time actvitiies for the curriculum were developed, adding opportunities for increased physical activity options. 3) Program evaluation tools for outcome measures, process evaluation and fidelity of implementation were revised and finalized. 4) The dissemination tool, eB4CAST, was evaluated; the tool will be used to capture and assemble data and to support sustainability and timelessness. 5) A community-based participatory research approach was used to adapt the Cook 4-H curriculum for use with Sub-Saharan African refugee families. Curriculum adaptation was initiated through feasibility testing to address perceived dietary acculturation barriers to food insecurity. The impact of iCook 4-H should be realized through the expanding reach and systematic approach for dissemination and sustainability. iCook 4-H is an out-of-school program for nine and ten year old youth and their main adult food preparer to cook, eat and play together for healthful lifestyles. The obesity prevention program was prepared for broad dissemination using a Community Based Participatory Research approach. After the 2-year Intervention Study, BMI z-scores of treatment youth increased (P=.05) compared to controls, but there were no group differences in odds of being overweight or obese (OR=42, P=.06). Control youth decreased dairy foods by -.26 cup-equivalent per year (P=.001), while treatment youth maintained intake by changing only -.08 cup-equivalent per year (P=.19). A qualitative assessment, using Ripple Effect Mapping, was conducted after the 2-year Intervention Study. When youth and adults were asked to identify the impact of iCook 4-H on themselves, family and community, seven categories emerged: improved health; increased community involvement; increased knowledge; increased communication; changed motivation; financial mindfulness; and increased appreciation for family. The overarching theme was "Learning new skills together through trying new things (cooking, eating and playing) leads to positive individual, family and community change." Based on the cooking videos posted on the iCook 4-H website, cutting, mixing and measuring were the most frequent techniques demonstrated. Both males and females equally demonstrated cutting skills, however females practiced becoming proficient at knife skills twice as much as males. Males were more likely to ask for help while cooking and adults gave male versus female youth positive comments while cooking. Parent typologies were observed to be supportive, negative, laid-back, or mixed in their approach to their youth. Youth with supportive parents had the highest levels of cooking confidence and those who had laid-back parents had the lowest levels of cooking confidence (P=001). Of the total 228 youth in the Intervention Study,155 youth (68%) were fitted with accelerometers month 0 and the same youth, if they continued in the study, wore the monitors for seven consecutive days at 4, 12, and 24 months Sedentary time and physical activity (light, moderate, vigorous, and moderate-to-vigorous) were measured. Self-reported physical activity and questions about goals for families playing together were also assessed. Positive changes were not found over the two-year study for any of the measures. In the Dissemination Study, changes in outcome measures for program evaluation were positive for youth and adults. Youth increased cooking skills (P=.03) and adults reported increasing behavior for eating together (P=.01) and cooking together (P.01). Awards for iCook 4-H Team State Winner: Program Excellence through Research. Awarded to the iCook 4-H team by the Tennessee Extension Association of Family & Consumer Sciences, November 2015. 3rd Place Southern Region Winner - Family Health & Wellness. Awarded to the iCook 4-H team by the Southern Region of the National Extension Association of Family & Consumer Sciences, November 2015.

Publications

  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: White A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M. iCook 4-H: A program to promote culinary skills and family meals. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav.2014;46:S199S200.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Olfert M, Lilly C, White J, Colby S, Meade R, Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel M, Kattelmann K, Wilson-Sweebe K, Mathews D, White A. Health disparities including and not including race correlate to quality of life: iCook 4-H. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2014;46: S124-125.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Mathews D, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Colby S, Olfert M, White A. Use of a systematic 3-pronged evaluation to measure, monitor, and test fidelity of the 5-state iCook 4-H program. FASEB J. 2015;29:S395.8.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Donaldson AB, Colby SE, Flanagan SM, Franzen-Castle LD, Kattelmann KK, Mathews D, Merfeld CM, Olfert MD, Plaggemeyer AK, White AA, Yerxa K. Cooking behavior and self-efficacy of 9-10 year old youth: iCook 4-H. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2014; 114(9): S-A64.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Meade R, Colby S, White A, Mathews D, Yerxa K, Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel M, Kattelmann K, Kabala C, White J, Olfert M. iCook 4-H: Childhood BMI is Associated with Family Meal Frequency. J Acad Nutr Diet 2014;114(9), SA64.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Colby S, Meade R, Donaldson A, Franzen-Castle L, Plaggemeyer A, Kattelmann K, Merfeld C, Mathews D, Smith E, Olfert M, White A. Child food intake and habits at intervention baseline: iCook 4-H. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2014;46; S110.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Mathews D, Yerxa K, Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel M, Aguirre T, Colby S, Meade R, Kattelmann K, Kabala C, Olfert M, Wells A, White A. Fidelity of implementation of a 4-H program to promote culinary skills and family meals for obesity prevention: iCook 4-H. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2014;46; S152-153.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Bates J, White A, Mathews D, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M. Coming together: Family relationships and healthy food preparation. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2014;46; S184.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Smith E, Root A, Flanagan S, Colby S, Meade R, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, Kattelmann K, Kabala C, White A, Mathews D, Olfert M. Assessing blood pressure and quality of life in 9- to 10-year-old children: iCook 4-H pilot study. J Nutr Educ Behav.2014;46; S123-S124.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Meade R, Colby S, Donaldson A, Franzen-Castle L, Plaggemeyer A, Kattelmann K, Kabala C, Mathews D, White J, Olfert M, White A. Influencers of family meal experience: iCook 4-H. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2014;46; S102.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel M, White A, Mathews DR, Yerxa K, Colby S, Meade R, Kattelmann K, Kabala C, Olfert M, Flanagan S. Assessing effectiveness of the implementation of a 12-week curriculum for youth and adults: iCook 4-H. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2014;46: S104.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Merfeld C, Kattelmann K, Meendering J, Mathews D, Olfert M, White J, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, White A. iCook 4-H: Report of the correlation between quality of life measures and physical activity in 9- to 10-year old children. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2014; 46: S134.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Miller A, Franzen-Castle L, White A, Mathews DR, Colby S, Meade R, Kattelmann K, Kabala C, Olfert M, White J. Characteristics and kitchen proficiency of adults at intervention baseline: iCook 4-H. J Nutr Educ. Behav.2014;46; S186.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: White J, Wells A, Colby S, Donaldson A, Franzen-Castle L, Miller A, Kattelmann K, Merfeld C, Mathews D, White A., Olfert M. Collecting highlights from leaders about a cooking and physical activity program for family dyads: iCook 4-H. J Nutr Educ Behav.; 2014 46: S123. DOI: 10.1016/j.jneb.2014.04.074
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Kabala C, Kattelmann K, Meendering J, Mathews D, Olfert M, White J, Colby S, Meade R, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, White A. iCook 4-H: Report of the correlation between the Block Kids Physical Activity Screener and accelerometer-derived physical activity in 9-10 year old children. FASEB J.2014; 28:LB460.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: Kabala C, Kattelmann K, Koens A, Meendering J, White A, Mathews D, Olfert M, Smith E, Gebremariam Y, Colby S, Sparks A, Franzen-Castle L. iCook 4-H: Assessment of physical activity in 9-10 year old children participating in a family-centered pilot intervention. J Nutr Educ Behav.2013;45:S69.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: Mathews D, Yerxa K, Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel M, Colby S, Meade R, Kattelmann K, Kabala C, Olfert M, Flanagan S, White A. iCook: Use of an online process evaluation to facilitate quality control of a 5-state 4-H program. FASAB J. 2013;27:367.5.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: Olfert M, Smith E, Flanagan E, Colby S, Shanklin K, White A, Mathews D, Yerxa K, Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel M, Kattelmann K, Koens A. iCook: Lessons learned about recruiting youth and their primary adult food preparer for a 4-H cooking intervention. FASAB J. 2013;27: 1063.18.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M, Mathews D, White A. iCook: Development of a web-based component of a 4-H cooking intervention. FASAB J. 2013;27:36.2.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Olfert M, White J, Wells, A, Franzen-Castle L, Colby S, Kattelmann, K, Mathews D, White A. iCook 4-H: Dyad model (youth/adult pair) used in recruiting for a multistate study. FASEB J. 2014; 28:A262.5.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: White A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M. iCook: A 4-H program to promote culinary skills and family meals for obesity prevention. J Nutr Educ Behav.2013;45:S91.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: Buttarazzi S, Mathews D, Aguirre T, Franzen-Castle L, Shanklin K, Colby S, Kattelmann, Smith E, Olfert M, Yerxa K, White A. iCook 4-H: piloting a childhood obesity prevention program  anthropometrics and dietary intake of children 9-10 years old. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2013;45:S76.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel, M, White A, Mathews D, Yerxa K, Colby S, Donaldson A, Kattelmann K, Koens A, Olfert M, Flanagan S. iCook: Developing a 4-H curriculum for youth and adults. FASAB J. 2013;27:1067.9.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: Olfert M, Smith E, Flanagan S, Colby S, Shanklin K, White A, Mathews D, Yerxa K, Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel M, Kattelmann K, Koens A. iCook: Lessons learned about recruiting youth and their primary adult food preparers for a 4-H cooking intervention. FASAB J.2013; 27: 1063.18.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: Hagedorn RL, Olfert MD. iCook 4-H: Providing West Virginia Families the Opportunity to Cook, Eat and Play Together for Childhood Obesity Prevention. WVAFCS Conference. Fairmont WV. April 2018
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: Olfert MD, Hagedorn RL, Colby SE, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, White A. A Childhood Obesity Prevention Program to Increase Cooking, Eating, and Playing Together in Families: iCook 4-H Study. SOPHE Annual Conference. Columbus OH. April 2018.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2017 Citation: Olfert MD, Hagedorn RL, Barr ML, Famodu OA, Clark RL, Charlier C, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, White A. Innovative tool - eB4CAST to disseminate childhood obesity prevention program - a five state collaborative. Dissemination and Implementation in Health. Washington DC. December 2017.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2017 Citation: Olfert MD, Hagedorn RL, Famodu OA, Barr ML, King SJ, Colby SE, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, White A. A Childhood Obesity Prevention Program to Increase Cooking, Eating, and Playing Together in Families: iCook 4-H Study. Annual Adolescent and Young Adult Research Symposium. Pittsburgh, PA. May 2017
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2017 Citation: King SJE, Hagedorn RL, Famodu OA, Barr ML, Morris AM, Colby SM, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann KK, White AA, Olfert MD. Using Impact Mapping in a Culinary Program Targeting Youth and Adult Dyads. Annual Adolescent and Young Adult Research Symposium. Pittsburgh, PA. May 2017
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2017 Citation: Krehbiel, M, Franzen-Castle, L. Food, Fitness, and Families: Lessons Learned from two Extension Cooking Programs. Nebraska-South Dakota Association of Family and Consumer Sciences Conference. Norfolk, NE, March, 2017.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2016 Citation: Hagedorn R, Famodu O, Barr M, King S, Morris A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattlemann K, White A, Olfert M. Extension Leadership Training Program for Teen Researchers to Deliver Community Based Programing Through the Health Science Technology Academy (HSTA). Davis College Reasearch and Creative Scholarship Day. Morgantown, WV. March 31, 2016. Placed 1st in poster competition $200 award.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2016 Citation: King SJE, Olfert MD, Hagedorn RL, Famodu OA, Barr ML, Morris AM, Colby SE, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann KK, White AA. iCook 4-H: Using Ripple Effect Mapping to Determine Impact- 2 Years Post-Intervention. West Virginia Rural Health Conference. Logan, WV. October 2016.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2016 Citation: Hagedorn RL, Famodu OA, Barr ML, King SJ, Morris AM, Colby SE, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, White A, Olfert MD. A Childhood Obesity Prevention Program to Increase Cooking, Eating, and Playing Together in Families: iCook 4-H Study. West Virginia Family Medicine Conference. Morgantown, WV. September 2016.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2016 Citation: Parsley M, Famodu O, Hagedorn R, Olfert M. Statewide Dissemination of a Culinary Skills, Family Mealtime, and Physical Activity program through HSTA. Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol (URDC). Charleston, WV. February 25, 2016.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2015 Citation: Hagedorn R, Olfert M. Using Teen Peer-Leaders to Implement the iCook 4-H Childhood Obesity Prevention Program. National McNair/SSS Research Conference and Graduate School Fair.University of Delaware. Newark, DE. Oct 9, 2015. Placed 2nd in oral competition $150 award.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2015 Citation: Bates J, Olfert M, Kattelmann K, Franzen-Castle L, Colby S, Mathews D, White A. Healthy Parents, Healthy Relationships, and Family Mealtime: A Winning Combination. National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences Annual Session, White Sulphur Springs, WV, November 2015.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2015 Citation: Flanagan S, Olfert M, Allan T, Franzen-Castle L, Colby S, Kattelmann K, Lerhke T, Mathews D, White A. iCook 4-H: A Program to Promote Culinary Skills, Family Meals and Physical Activity Together for Obesity Prevention. National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences Annual Session, White Sulphur Springs, WV, November 2015.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2015 Citation: Olfert MD; Hagedorn RL. iCook: A 4-H Program to Promote Culinary Skills and Family Meals for Obesity Prevention. Health Science & Technology Academy Parent Night. Morgantown High School. Morgantown, WV. August 24, 2015.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2015 Citation: Hagedorn R, White J, Famodu O, Barr M, Hanks S, Chester A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattlemann K, White A, Olfert M. Community Research through Teen Implementation. Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol. Charleston, WV. March 4, 2015.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2015 Citation: White J, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelman K, White A, Olfert M. Collecting Highlights and Feedback from Leaders and Participants in a Cooking and Physical Activity Programs for Family Dyads: iCook 4-H. Van Liere Convocation & WVU HSC Research Day. Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV. Feb 26-27, 2015
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2014 Citation: Krehbiel M, White A, Franzen-Castle L. iCook: Engaging youth and adults in a 4-H cooking intervention. National Afterschool Association Convention, New York City, NY. March 2014
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2014 Citation: Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel M, White A, Mathews D, Yerxa K, Colby S, Meade R, Kattelmann K, Kabala C, Olfert M, Flanagan, S. Assessing Effectiveness of the Implementation of a 12-week Curriculum for Youth and Adults: iCook 4-H. Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior Annual Conference, Milwaukee, WI. Panel presentation, June,2014
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2013 Citation: Colby S, Olfert M, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Mathews D, White A. iCook: Development and pilot testing of a cooking intervention for youth and adults. Asia-Pacific Academic Consortium for Public Health, Wuhan, China. October 2013.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2013 Citation: Donaldson A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M, White A. Building cooking confidence as a foundation for a healthy diet. Southern Obesity Summit. Nashville, TN. November, 2013.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2013 Citation: Donaldson A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M, White A. iCook 4-H: Pilot test of a cooking program to promote health in youth. Exhibition of Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievement. Knoxville, TN. April, 2013.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2012 Citation: Buttarazzi S. (2012) Assessing Anthropometric Measurements, Maturation Stage, and Dietary Intake of 9-10 Year Old Children in the iCook 4-H Study. (Masters thesis) University of Maine.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: Koens, A. (2013) iCook 4-H: Assessment of Physical Activity in 9-10 Year Old Children Participating in a Family-Centered Pilot Intervention, (Masters thesis). South Dakota State University.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Smith, E. (2014) Blood Pressure and Quality of Life in Youth Enrolled in a Culinary Skills, Family Mealtime and Physical Activity Program: Pilot Study iCook 4-H, (Masters thesis). West Virginia University.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Brown M. (2014) Assessing Family Dynamics of iCook 4-H Participants in a 5-State Pilot Study. (Masters Thesis) University of Maine.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Miller A.(2014) Psychosocial Food-Related Behavior and Food Intake of Adult Main Meal Preparers of Food for 9-10 Year Old Children Participating in iCook, a 5-State Childhood Obesity Prevention Pilot Study. (Masters thesis). University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Mathews, D. (2015) Development of a Three-Pronged Approach to Evaluation for the iCook 4-H Project, (PhD dissertation). University of Maine
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Kabala, C. (2015) iCook 4-H: The Relationship Between The Block Kids Physical Activity Screener and Accelerometer Derived Physical Activity in 9-10 Year Old Children.(Masters thesis). South Dakota State University.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: White, J. (2015). Developing a Curriculum to Increase Gardening Skills, Culinary Competence and Family Meal Time in Youth and Their Caregiver. (Masters thesis). West Virginia University
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Merfeld, C. (2016) iCook 4-H: Report of Accelerometer Derived Physical Activity in 9-10 Year Old Children from Baseline, Post, and Follow-Up. (Masters thesis). South Dakota State University.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Richardson, K. (2016). iCook 4-H intervention: Food-related behavior and intake of adult main meal preparers participating in a 5-state childhood obesity prevention study. (Master's thesis). Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Randall J. (2016) Preparing for Effective Program Dissemination and Implementation: An Analysis of Problems and Proposals for the iCook 4-H Program. (Masters thesis). University of Maine.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: King, S. (2017) Ripple Effect Mapping of Youth & Adult Dyad Pairs Demonstrating Community Impact from iCook 4-H Intervention. (Masters thesis). West Virginia University.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Gould T. (2017) Evaluating the Dissemination of the iCook 4-H Program Using Outcome, Process, and Fidelity Measures. (Masters thesis) University of Maine.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Ford AD.(2015) Associations of Cooking Self-efficacy and Frequency of iCook-4H Youth Participants with Dietary Quality and BMI at Baseline. (Master's thesis) University of Tennessee.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Accepted Year Published: 2018 Citation: White AA, Colby SE, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann KK, Olfert MD, Gould TA, Hagedorn RL, Mathews DR, Moyer J, Wilson-Sweebe K, Yerxa K. The iCook 4-H Study: An Intervention and Dissemination Test of a Youth/Adult Out-of-School Program. J Nutr Educ Behav.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Accepted Year Published: 2018 Citation: Franzen-Castle L, Colby SE, Kattelmann KK, Olfert MD, Mathews DR, Yerxa K, Baker B, Krehbiel M, Lehrke T, Wilson-Sweebe K, Flanagan SM, Ford A, Aguirre T, White AA. Development of the iCook 4-H curriculum for youth and adults: Cooking,eating, and playing together for childhood obesity prevention. J Nutr Educ Behav.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Accepted Year Published: 2018 Citation: Olfert MD, Hagedorn RL, Barr M, Colby SE, Kattelmann KK, Franzen-Castle L, White AA. Dissemination approach using infographic reports depicting program impact of a community-based research program: eB4CAST in iCook 4-H. J Nutri Educ Behav.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Under Review Year Published: 2018 Citation: Colby SE, Moret L, Olfert MD, Kattelmann KK, Franzen-Castle L, Allison C, Payne M, Ellington A, Wiggins S, Springer C, Fouts HN, Butler R, Mathews DR, White AA. I show what I learn: Youth created cooking videos in iCook 4-H. J Nutr Edu Behav.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Accepted Year Published: 2018 Citation: Olfert MD, King SJ, Hagedorn RL, Barr ML, Baker BA, Colby SE, Kattelmann KK, Franzen-Castle L, White AA. Ripple effects mapping outcomes of a childhood obesity prevention program for youth and adult dyads using a qualitative approach: iCook 4-H. J Nutr Edu Behav.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Accepted Year Published: 2018 Citation: Kattelmann KK, Meendering JR, Hofer E, Merfeld CM, Olfert MD, Hagedorn RL, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Moyer J, Mathews DR, White AA. The iCook 4-H Study: Report on physical activity and sedentary time in youth participating in a multicomponent program promoting family cooking, eating and playing together. J Nutr Educ Behav.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Accepted Year Published: 2018 Citation: Mathews DR, Kunicki Z, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann KK, Olfert MD, White AA. Development and testing of program evaluation instruments for the iCook 4-H curriculum. J Nutr Educ Behav.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Olfert MD, Famodu O, Flanagan S,Smith E, Leary M, Hagedorn R, White J, Koenings M, Colby SE, Kattelmann KK, Franzen-Castle L, White AA. The effect of iCook 4-H, a childhood obesity prevention program on blood pressure and quality of life in youth and adults; A randomized control trial. J Child Obes. 2018;3:1-8.DOI: 10.21767/2572-5394.100044
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Hagedorn RL, White JA, Franzen-Castle L, Colby SE, Kattelmann KK, White AA, Olfert MD.Teens implementing a childhood obesity prevention program in the community: Feasibility and perceptions of a partnership with HSTA and iCook 4-H. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018;15:934.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Kattelmann KK, Hofer E, Merfeld C, Meendering J, Olfert MD, McNamara JA, Colby SE, Meade R, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, Mathews DR, Moyer J, White AA. Quality of life associated with physical activity but not sedentary time in youth. J Child Obes. 2018;3 DOI:10.21767/2572-5394.100052
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: McElrone M, Colby SE, Franzen-Castle L, Olfert MD, Kattelmann KK, White AA. Prevalence and predictors of household food insecurity among adult/youth dyads at the initiation of the iCook 4-H two-year obesity prevention study. J Child Obes.2018;3 (S1),2. DOI:10.21767/2572-5394.100055
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Olfert MD, Barr ML, Hagedorn RL, Franzen-Castle L, Colby SE, Kattelmann KK, White AA. Health disparities score composite of youth and parent dyads from an obesity prevention intervention: iCook 4-H. Healthcare. 2018; 6(2):51. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6020051
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Olfert MD, Hagedorn RL, White JA, Baker BA, Colby SE, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann KK, White AA. An impact mapping method to generate robust qualitative evaluation of community-based research programs for youth and adults. Methods Protoc. 2018;1,25. doi:/10.3390/mps1030025
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: White JA, Hagedorn RL, Waterland NL, Barr ML Famodu OA, Root AE, White AA, Colby SE, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann KK, Olfert MD. Development of iGrow: A curriculum for youth/adult dyads to increase gardening skills, culinary competence , and family meal time for youths and their adult caregivers. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018, 15, 1401 https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071401.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Accepted Year Published: 2018 Citation: Haskell JE, Baker BA, Olfert MD, Colby SE, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann KK, White AA. Using Ripple Effects Maps to identify Story Threads: A framework to link private to public value. J Human Science Extension.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Miller A, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre, T, Krehbiel M, Colby SE, Kattelmann, KK, Olfert MD, Mathews DR, White AA. Food-related behavior and intake of adult main meal preparers of 9-10 year-old children participating in iCook 4-H: A five-state childhood obesity prevention pilot study. Appetite. 2016;101:163-170. PMID:26970294 DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2016.03.006
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Sorenson A, Kattelmann KK, Meendering J, Kabala, C, Mathews D, Olfert M, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, White A. Assessment of physical activity in 9- to 10-year-old children participating in a family-centered intervention. Top Clin Nutr. 2015;30(2):159-166. DOI: 10.1097/TIN.0000000000000032
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2018 Citation: White AA, Kattelmann KK, Cunningham-Sabo L, Metcalfe JJ. Evaluation and dissemination experiences from evidenced-based hands-on cooking programs with children and families. Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior, July 24, 2018.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: Colby S, Moret L, Olfert MD, Kattelmann K, Franzen-Castle L, Riggsbee K, Payne M, Ellington A, Springer C, Allison C, Wiggins S, Butler R, Mathews DR, White AA. Incorporating technology in the iCook 4-H intervention program for youth and adults. J Medical Internet Res.DOI: 10.2196/preprints.11235
  • Type: Other Status: Other Year Published: 2017 Citation: White A. iCook 4-H: an out of school program for youth/adult dyads to cook, eat,and play together. China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. May 16, 2017
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Under Review Year Published: 2018 Citation: Mathews DR,Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann KK, Colby SE, Olfert MD, White AA. Development and implementation of an instrument to evaluate fidelity of implementation. Eval Program Plann
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2018 Citation: White AA, Franzen-Castel L, Kattelmann KK, Tschakert M, Colby SE, McElrone M, Olfert MD, Hagedorn RL. Expanding iimpact through diversification: Year 6 of iCook 4-H. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2018;50,S114.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: McElrone M, Colby SE, Franzen-Castle L, Olfert MD, Kattelmann K, White A. (Prevalence and predictors of household food insecurity among iCook 4-H participants at baseline: A multivariable binomial logisitic modeling approach. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2017:117 (10), A141.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: White AA, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann KK, Colby SE, Olfert MD. Outputs and outcomes at Year 5 of the out-of-school program for youth and adult dyads: iCook 4-H. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2017; 49(7):7S1.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Gould T, Yerxa K, Franzen-Castle L, Brison C, Aguirre T, Kattelmann KK, Wilson-Sweebe K, Colby SE, McElrone M, Olfert MD, Hagedorn RL, White AA. Efficacy of the iCook 4-H dissemination using outcome and fidelity of implementation measures. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2017;49(7) S27-S28.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Allison C, Colby S, Kattelmann K, Franzen- L, Olfert M, Butler R, Payne M, Ellington A, Wiggins S, White A. Skills demonstrated in cooking videos in response to weekly cooking lessons. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2017:49(7); S74.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Wiggins S, Colby S, Allison C, Butler R, Payne M, Ellington A, Fouts H, Moret l, Olfert M, Kattelmann K, Franzen-Castle L, White A. iCook 4-H: Parenting typology reflected youth creating cooking videos. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2017:49(7); S67-S68.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: White A, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Colby S, Olfert MD. Cooking, eating and playing together: iCook 4-H year 4. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2016; 48(7):S134.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Olfert M, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Baker B, White A. iCook 4-H: Using mapping of community capitals following a 2-year iCook program. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2016; 48(7): S144. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2016.04.320
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Olfert M, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Baker B, White A. iCook 4-H: Using mapping of community capitals following a 2-year iCook program. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2016; 48(7): S144. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2016.04.320
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Hagedorn R, Famodu O, Barr M, King S, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, White A, Olfert M. Extension leadership training program for teen researchers to deliver community based programing through the Health Science Technology Academy(HSTA). J Nutr Educ Behav.2016; 48 (7):S143.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Hofer E, Kattelmann K, Merfeld C, Meendering J, Olfert M, Hagedorn R, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Mathews D, White A. iCook 4-H: Baseline to 24-month accelerometer-derived physical activity in youth. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2016;48(7):S30.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Olfert M, Famodu O, Barr M, King S, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, White A. Extension leadership training program for teen researchers to deliver community based programing through the Health Science Technology Academy (HSTA). J Nutr Educ Behav. 2016; 48, S144.DOI:10.1016/j.jneb.2016.04.318
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2017 Citation: Morris AM, Hagedorn RL, Barr ML, King SJ, Famodu OA, Clark RL, Charlier CM, White A, Colby SE, Kattelmann K, Franzen-Castle L, Olfert MD. Application of a Novel Forecasting and footprinting dissemination framework to a community based childhood obesity prevention program. FASEB J. 2017 31(1): S302.7.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: White A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M. Out-of-school culinary and physical activity program for children and their main food preparer: iCook 4-H Year 3. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2015;47:S95.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Hagedorn R, White J, Famodu O, Barr M, Hanks S, Chester A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, White A, Olfert MD. Using high school leaders in dissemination and implementation through the Health Sciences Technology Academy (HSTA): iCook 4-H Study. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2015; 47:S38.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Mathews D, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M, White A. Use of word clouds as a novel approach for analysis and presentation of qualitative data for program evaluation. J Nutr Educ Behav.2015;47:S26.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Merfeld CM, Kattelmann KK, Meendering JR, Meade R, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, Olfert M, Colby S, White AA. iCook 4-H: Report of the accelerometer derived physical activity in 9-10 year old children from baseline to post. J Nutr Educ Behav.2015;47:S79-S80.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Olfert MD, Famodu O, White J, Barr M, Hagedorn R, Meade R, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, Kabala C, Kattelmann K, Mathews D, White A. Blood pressure and quality of life in 9-11 year old youth and adults dyad pairs over one year: iCook 4-H Study. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2015; 47:S83.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Olfert MD, Scatterday A, Famodu O, White J, Barr M, Hagedorn R, Woehrer K, Meade R, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Wilson-Sweebe K, Kattelmann K, Yerxa K, White A. Health disparate score change over 12 months: iCook 4-H Study. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2015;47:S83.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Randall J, Yerxa K, Allan T, Brison C, Fenton A, Goertz J, Lindley V, Spurling D, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M, Mathews D, White A. Piloting iCook 4-H prepares program for community dissemination. J Nutr Educ. Behav. 2015; 47:S84.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: White J, Famodu O, Barr M, Merfeld C, Kattelmann K, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, Colby S, Manuel L, White A, Mathews D, Olfert MD. Cooking, mealtime & physical activities incorporated in the home environment one year after initial intervention session: iCook 4-H. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2015; 47:S38-S39.


Progress 08/01/16 to 07/31/17

Outputs
Target Audience: Nothing Reported Changes/Problems: Nothing Reported What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?Opportunities for professional development include the theses projects completed by graduate students Students have had opportunities to analyze data, develop theses and defend their research. They have presented their work at state and national professional organizations. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?Dissemination has occurred through presentations at the state, national and international levels. Presentations have been made at the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior and Experimental Biology. Dr. White presented, "iCook 4-H: an out of school program for youth/adult dyads to cook, eat and play together," at the China Medical University in Taichung, Taiwan on May16, 2017. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?Work remaining is to continue the evaluation of the dissemination data collected from iCook 4-H, which was tested during the fifth/last year of the grant, to incorporate into the publicly available training toolkit (including curriculum and many resources supports) to set a solid platform to achieve sustainability. 1) Since the plan is to have the iCook 4-H program available nationally through the 4-H National Mall, we would like to track the people who use the program to document how it is implemented, the accomplishments and problems on a broader scale than has been done to date to facilitate a flexible, functional program. We have developed a curriculum implementation training course on the eXtension Campus Moodle website and there are analytics available through that site to assist in the tracking. eXtension has implemented a new service that provides detailed course and learner analytics delivered through Moodle. This service is being provided by Intelliboard, a company specializing in online learning analytics. Through Intelliboard, course teachers can view the performance and progress of those enrolled in their respective courses as well as analyze what elements of their courses appear to be most popular, or with which elements the participants are having most difficulty. 2) There was no dissemination framework available that fit our program's needs of community impact assessment, implementation, and evaluation. Therefore, a new dissemination framework, eB4CAST, was developed. eB4CAST stands for evidence-based capture, assemble, sustain, and timelessness. It is in the early stages of development and testing. There are additional plans for formative evaluation based on expert reviews and cognitive interviews, as well as tracking its real-world use to determine feasibility and generalizability. As part of the framework, there is an Impact Evaluation at the final session of the program for participants to identify how being in iCook has impacted them, their family, their community and beyond. These data are collected, analyzed and become part of the eB4CAST data that is given back to leaders. This feedback to users of the iCook program is seen as important to its sustainability and helps to meet our timelessness goal. We need the time to test and refine the framework in real-world settings by monitoring its usefulness, and more importantly, to modify it based on systematic feedback from those who use the framework. 3) After analysis of the intervention and dissemination outcomes, we have determined that we need to enhance the physical activity sections of the curriculum and have additional training materials for leaders so that more options are available for moderate and vigorous activity in those sections. These materials will be developed during the no-cost extension. 4) An evaluation will be conducted of the feasibility of adapting and implementing the iCook curriculum to fit the dietary acculturation needs of a food insecure, Sub-Saharan African refugee population. The curriculum will be adapted to focus on acclimatizing to a new food environment. A pilot test of the revised curriculum will be conducted to compare cooking behavior and food security status of the intervention group to a non-treatment control pre and post intervention. A qualitative assessment will be conducted to determine acceptability with refugee participants.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? Outcomes and outputs were generated during year 5 of the out-of-school program for youth and adult dyads. 1) A 57% retention rate was achieved for the 2-year control/treatment intervention study (n=228 dyads at baseline). To test sustainability of the program with little researcher involvement, a dissemination study was conducted (n=57 dyads). The curriculum is 8, 2-hour sessions designed to impact health-promoting behavior for 9-10 year olds and their adult food preparer. The curriculum content includes food preparation and family activities to encourage eating, communicating and being physically active together. Four seasonal newsletters serve as boosters following sessions. Evidence-based pre/post program outcome evaluations of dyads and a fidelity instrument to test intended versus actual implementation accompany the curriculum. A novel framework, eB4CAST, to document impact and effect of evidence-based research is in development. A training course is on the eXtension campus moodle website. During the intervention study, physical assessments were measured for youth and surveys were completed by dyads. In dissemination, program outcomes were assessed. After two years, the treatment vs control youth were higher for baseline adjusted BMI z-scores, fruit/vegetable intake (2.16 vs 1.67 cups/day; P=0.04) and dairy (0.57 cups/day; P=0.02). No intake differences remained after 1000 kcal standardization. For treatment adults vs control, food resource management was 0.87 points higher (P=0.02). When analyzing the two studies together for program outcomes, treatment vs control was higher, for youth, cooking skills (P=0.0002) and culinary self-efficacy (P=0.03) and, for adults, measure of "cooking, eating, playing together" (P=0.04). iCook 4-H is being prepared for national distribution. 2) Cooking videos posted on the iCook website by youth (n=45 males ; n=40 females) during the 2-year intervention study were assessed to identify skills they demonstrated. Cutting, mixing, and measuring were the most frequent techniques Cutting skills were evenly demonstrated by both males and females. Females practiced being proficient at knife skills twice as much as males. Recipes prepared were of low to moderate complexity. Handwashing was actively demonsrated. Of the 66 observations in which a youth asked for help, 74% were requests from males. Adults gave males versus females positive comments during cooking (n=59 times for males vs 36 times for females). Skills demonstrated in videos reflected curriculum content. Four typologies of parents were observed in the vidoes: supportive, negative, laid-back, and mixed. Parents with negative and supportive typologies had more affluent kitchen equipment whereas parents with laid-back and mixed typologies had less affluent kitchen equipment (p=0.014). Parents with negative typologies had the least cluttered kitchen environments; those with mixed typologies had the most cluttered environments (p< 0.000). Youth whose parents were laid-back or mixed typology asked for assistance more often than those with supportive or negative typology parents (p<0.000). Youth of parents with supportive typology had the highest levels of cooking confidence whereas youth of parents with laid-back typology had the lowest levels of cooking confidence (p=0.001). Further investigation of these findings is needed.

Publications

  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Miller A, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, Krehbiel M, Colby S, Kattelmann K, Olfert M, Mathews D, White A. 2016. Food-related behavior and intake of adult main meal preparers of 9-10 year-old children participating in iCook 4-H: A five-state childhood obesity prevention pilot study. Appetite101:163-170.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Morris AM, Hagedorn RL, Barr ML, King SJ, Famodu OA, Clark RL, Charlier CM, White A, Colby SE, Kattelmann K, Franzen-Castle L, Olfert MD. 2017. Application of a Novel Forecasting and Footprinting Dissemination Framework to a Community Based Childhood Obesity Prevention Program. The FASEB J. 31(1): S302.7.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: White A, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Colby S, Olfert M. 2016. Cooking, eating and playing together: iCook 4-H Year 4. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 48:S134.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: King S, Olfert M, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Baker B, White A. 2016. iCook 4-H: Using mapping of community capitals following a 2-year iCook program. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav.48:S144.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2016 Citation: Hagedorn RL, Famodu OA, Barr ML, King SJ, Morris AM, Colby SE, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, White A, Olfert MD. A Childhood Obesity Prevention Program to Increase Cooking, Eating, and Playing Together in Families: iCook 4-H Study. West Virginia Rural Health Conference. Logan, WV. October 2016.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2016 Citation: King SJE, Olfert MD, Hagedorn RL, Famodu OA, Barr ML, Morris AM, Colby SE, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann KK, White AA. iCook 4-H: Using Ripple Effect Mapping to Determine Impact- 2 Years Post-Intervention. West Virginia Rural Health Conference. Logan, WV. October 2016.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2017 Citation: Olfert MD, Hagedorn RL, Famodu OA, Barr ML, King SJ, Colby SE, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, White A. A Childhood Obesity Prevention Program to Increase Cooking, Eating, and Playing Together in Families: iCook 4-H Study. Annual Adolescent and Young Adult Research Symposium. Pittsburgh, PA. May 2017
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2017 Citation: King SJE, Hagedorn RL, Famodu OA, Barr ML, Morris AM, Colby SM, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann KK, White AA, Olfert MD. Using Impact Mapping in a Culinary Program Targeting Youth and Adult Dyads. Annual Adolescent and Young Adult Research Symposium. Pittsburgh, PA. May 2017
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Merfeld, C. (2016) iCook 4-H: Report of Accelerometer Derived Physical Activity in 9-10 Year Old Children from Baseline, Post, and Follow-Up (Thesis)South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Hofer, E.(2016)iCook 4-H: 0 to 24-month physical activity and sedentary time in youth. (Thesis)South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Randall, J.(2016) Preparing for Effective Program Dissemination and Implementation: An Analysis of Problems and Proposals for the iCook 4-H Program (Thesis)University of Maine, Orono, ME
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Hagedorn R, Famodu O, Barr M, King S, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, White A, Olfert M. 2016. Extension leadership training program for teen researchers to deliver community based programing through the Health Science Technology Academy (HSTA). J. Nutr. Educ. Behav.48:S143.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2016 Citation: Hagedorn RL, Famodu OA, Barr ML, King SJ, Morris AM, Colby SE, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, White A, Olfert MD. A Childhood Obesity Prevention Program to Increase Cooking, Eating, and Playing Together in Families: iCook 4-H Study. West Virginia Family Medicine Conference. Morgantown, WV. September 2016.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: King SJE.(2017) Ripple Effect Mapping of Youth and Adult Dyad Pairs Demonstrating Community Impact from iCook 4-H Intervention. (Thesis) West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Richardson,K. 2016. iCook 4-H Intervention: Food-Related Behavior and Intake of Adult Main Meal Preparers Participating in a 5-State Childhood Obesity Prevention Study (Thesis) University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln, NE
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2017 Citation: Krehbiel, M, Franzen-Castle, L. Food, Fitness, and Families: Lessons Learned from two Extension Cooking Programs. Nebraska-South Dakota Association of Family and Consumer Sciences Conference. Norfolk, NE, March, 2017.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: White A, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Colby S, Olfert M. Outputs and Outcomes at Year 5 of the Out-of-School Program for Youth and Adult Dyads: iCook 4-H. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2017; 49(7):7S1.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Allison C, Colby S, Kattelmann K, Franzen-Castle L, Olfert M, Butler R, Payne M, Ellington A, Wiggins S, White A. Skills Demonstrated in Cooking Videos in Response to Weekly Cooking Lessons. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2017;49(7):7S1.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Wiggins S, Colby S, Allison C, Butler R, Payne M, Ellington A, Fouts H, Moret L, Olfert M, Kattelmann K. Franzen-Castle L, White A.iCook-4-H: Parenting Typology Reflected in Youth Created Cooking Videos. J Nutr Educ Behav 2017;49(7):7S1.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2017 Citation: Gould T, Yerxa K, Franzen-Castle L, et al. Efficacy of the iCook 4-H Dissemination Using Outcome and Fidelity of Implementation Measures. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2017;49(7):7S1.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Morris A, Hagedorn R, Barr M, King S, Famodul O, Clark R, Charlier C, White A, Colby S, Kattelmann K, Franzen-Castle L, Olfert M. eb4CAST: Application of a novel forecasting and foodprinting dissemination framework to a community based childhood obesity prevention program. The FASEB Journal. 2016;30(1):1152.5.


Progress 08/01/15 to 07/31/16

Outputs
Target Audience:The target audience for year 4 of the iCook 4-H Study was a planned Dissemination Study that was conducted through Cooperative Extension in Maine, Nebraska, South Dakota and Tennessee and through the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) in West Virginia, which is a high school science and math enrichment program. In the Cooperative Extension programs there were 64 dyads (treatment, n=28 and control, n=36), who completed the iCook program and pre-post-program evaluations. Adults (age=39±6.6 yr) and youth (age= 9.6±0.8 yr) participated in 8 bi-weekly sessions. In the HSTA program, 29 dyads were provided the opportunity to cook, eat and play together. Changes/Problems: Nothing Reported What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided? The study design of iCook 4-H included incorporating assistant leaders and teen leaders to team up with the leaders to conduct bi-weekly sessions. Conference calls, and online webcam training sessions were held to prepare leaders for curriculum implementation. Trainings on Ripple Effect Mapping to understand the impact of the iCook program on communities by identifying capitals within the community: Built, Human, Financial,Social, Cultural, Natural, and Political. Trainings were first held for the multistate team who led the mapping with participants at the end of the 2-yr Intervention Study. Then, a video was produced for the Dissemination Study, to train the 13 leaders across the 5-states who led the iCook sessions. The mapping activity was included in the final session to evaluate the impact of the program into their families, and communities. Melissa Olfert, Co-PI, led trainings for the multistate team on methods used in the eB4cast model which is intended to increase the sustainability of the iCook program through its dissemination. Lisa Franzen-Castle, Co-PI, held trainings for curriculum implementation and a series of training videos were developed to train leaders of the Dissemination Study. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?Dissemination of results during year four occurred through abstract presentations at the 2015 annual meeting of the Society of Nutrition Education and Behavior and the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences Annual Session, 2015. The iCook team had a display in the booth of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in Washington DC, where 35,000 young people from across the nation came for presentations and exhibits designed to encourage STEM careers. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?During year 5, the final year of the study, dissemination of study results will continue. A public version of the curriculum will be completed and dissemination will occur through the National 4-H website. Extension personnel will continue to dissemination the program, providing training and monitoring of program implementation. In West Virginia, specifically, the program implementation will continue through the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA), a high school science and math enrichment program. The study time line includes monthly administrative conference calls, preparing the curriculum and training materials for Extension programming, dissemination of the iCook 4-H curriculum on the National 4-H website and providing information to the Families, Food, and Fitness eXtension website, monitoring curriculum use across the 5 states and continued data analysis and manuscript writing. In addition, grant writing will occur to continue research activities related to iCook 4-H, which is a unique dyad model enhancing the opportunity for synergism and translation to the home environment as families cook, eat and play together for a lifestyle approach to obesity prevention in youth.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? The dissemination of the iCook 4-H program was tested from August 2015- November 2015. The 3-pronged approach to evaluation developed during previous years of the study was conducted to determine program success, measure outcomes, and evaluate fidelity of implementation. Treatment (n=28) and control (n=36) dyads completed the iCook program and pre-post-program evaluations. Adults (age=39±6.6 yr) and youth (age= 9.6±0.8 yr) participated in 8 bi-weekly sessions. After program completion, adults reported increases in the three program components of cooking, eating and playing together within group (p=0.01) and between group (p=0.02) when compared to the control adults. The treatment youth reported within increases in cooking skills (p=0.01) and goal setting (p=0.01) and between group differences when compared to control youth for goal setting (p=0.03). Fidelity of Implementation (FOI) was completed during the 104 total sessions conducted by iCook leaders (n=13) over 16 weeks across all five states; Maine, Nebraska, South Dakota, Tennessee and West Virginia. Independent evaluators were trained and completed fidelity surveys using the instruments individualized by session number. Throughout the Dissemination Study, 27% of all sessions were evaluated for FOI. Evaluators ranked leaders as effective in program delivery 97% of the time and 91% of all session objectives were met. Youth and adult engagement in the sessions was rated as 88% and 91%, respectively. In year four of the iCook study, 24-month assessments (physical measures and surveys) were conducted on a total of 130 dyads (57% of baseline sample) in the Intervention Study. Researchers conducted physical assessments revealing that BMI z-score for treatment youth was 0.60 (n=90), and for control youth was 0.38 (n=40) (p=0.01). Survey responses were analyzed and treatment youth consumed 0.49 more cups of fruits/vegetables when compared to control youth (2.16c vs 1.67c, p=0.052). Treatment adults reported increases in kitchen proficiency when compared to control adults in frequency of checking food labels and not letting meat and dairy sit out for over two hours (p=0.01). Youth participants in the intervention study wore Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers for 7 days at all four time points, 0. 4. 12 and 24 months. Physical activity (PA) and sitting time was measured in 124 youth (n=88 intervention, n=36 control). Activity was measured in five categories, Sitting time (ST), light PA, moderate PA, vigorous PA, and moderate-to-vigorous PA. No differences were observed between physical activity or sitting time between treatment and control groups. Over all four time points, PA decreased and ST increased for both groups. The percent of participants who met the recommended 60 minute per day of PA was 84.5 % for control and 60.8 % for intervention at baseline, at 24-months, 0% of control and 16% of intervention met the guideline.

Publications

  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Olfert M. D, Scatterday A, Famodu O, White J, Barr M, Hagedorn R, Woehrer K, Meade R, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Wilson-Sweebe K, Kattelmann K, Yerxa K, White A. Health disparate score change over 12 months: iCook 4-H Study. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2015;47:S83.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Randall J,Yerxa K, Allan T, Brison C, Fenton A, Goertz J, Lindley V, Spurling D, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M, Mathews D,White A. Piloting iCook 4-H prepares program for community dissemination. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2015;47:S84.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: White J, Famodu O, Barr M, Merfeld C, Kattelmann K, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, Colby S, Manuel L, White A, Mathews D, Olfert MD. Cooking, mealtime & physical activities incorporated in the home environment one year after initial intervention session: iCook 4-H. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2015;47:S38-S39.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Mathews, D. (2015). Development of a 3-Pronged Approach to Evaluation for the iCook 4-H Project. (PhD Dissertation). University of Maine.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2016 Citation: Miller A, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, Krehbiel M, Colby S, Kattelmann K, Olfert M., Mathews D, White A. Food-related behavior and intake of adult main meal preparers of 9-10 year-old children participating in iCook 4-H: A five-state childhood obesity prevention pilot study. Appetite. 2016;101:163-170.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: White A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M. Out-of-school culinary and physical activity program for children and their main food preparer: iCook 4-H Year 3. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2015; 47: S95.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Hagedorn R, White J, Famodu O, Barr M, Hanks S, Chester A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattlemann K, White A, Olfert MD. Using high school leaders in dissemination and implementation through the Health Sciences Technology Academy (HSTA): iCook 4-H Study. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2015;47:S38.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Mathews D,* Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M, White A. Use of word clouds as a novel approach for analysis and presentation of qualitative data for program evaluation. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2015;47:S26.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Merfeld CM, Kattelmann KK, Meendering JR, Meade R, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, Olfert M, Colby S, White AA. iCook 4-H: Report of the accelerometer derived physical activity in 9-10 year old children from baseline to post. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2015;47:S79-S80.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Olfert M. D, Famodu O, White J, Barr M, Hagedorn R, Meade R, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, Kabala C, Kattelmann K, Mathews D,* White A. Blood pressure and quality of life in 9-11 Year old youth and adults dyad pairs over one year: iCook 4-H Study. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2015;47:S83.


Progress 08/01/14 to 07/31/15

Outputs
Target Audience:The target audience are 9- to 10-year-old children and their adult main food preparer. The Intervention Study dyads (n=220) continued to be reached during the period. The target audience for the pilot dissemination was 27 dyads from three participating states (Maine, Nebraska, and Tennessee). Youth participants were 66% female. Changes/Problems:No major changes to the program will occur. The change that was made was to recruit teens as assistant leaders to implement the iCook program. The reason is because teens seem to be well-suited to assist with the technology and physical activity aspects of the program. Through the program, teens can gain very good community service involvement and develop leadership skills. Training for researchers and program leaders in how to be involved in youth development activities has begun and will continue. What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided?The opportunity for training has occurred for student researchers, and community collaborators who are part of the iCook project, as well as principal investigators. In preparation for incorporating "Teens as Teachers" into the iCook Dissemination Study, researchers were trained in youth development by Jennifer Lobley, Maine Statewide Extension Educator for Volunteer Development; and Michelle Krehbiel, Youth Development Specialist University of Nebraska- Lincoln Extension. They are conducting a series of trainings. Researchers were trained in use of Ripple Effect Mapping, a process to the extended impact of a project from study participants. The objective will be to determine the interlinking and multi-faceted short-, medium- and long-term impact of the program on not only the participants but also their families and communities. Barbara Baker, 4-H Youth Development Educator with UMaine Cooperative Extension faculty is conducting a series of trainings for the researchers and iCook program leaders. She works with communities to sustain youth and adult partnership opportunities for building human and social capital. Melissa Olfert, Co-PI, has led the training in eb4cast, a model to collect forecasting and footprinting data to improve the adoption and sustainability of the iCook Program as the researchers move into the dissemination phase. The model was patterned after RE-AIM and has been adapted to fit the needs of the current project. Lisa Franzen-Castle, Co-PI, has led the training in the curriculum implementation for researchers and program leaders. Training on short, online training modules has been done. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest?Dissemination occurred in year 3 by the presentation of abstracts at meetings of the Society of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 2014; The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 2014 and Experimental Biology, 2015. One article has been published in Topics of Clinical Nutrition, 2015 What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals? During the next reporting period, the iCook multistate team will complete the 24-month assessment of the Intervention Study. Treatment participants will be asked to participate in focus groups on October, 2015, to gather information on the interlinking and multi-faceted short-, medium- and long-term impact of the program on not only the participants but also their families and communities. We will continue to analyze the intervention study and pilot dissemination study findings and disseminate these through student theses/dissertations and writing manuscripts. Abstracts will continue to be presented at national and state-level conferences. Training for implementation of the Dissemination Study, fall 2015, will occur to program leaders and assistant leaders/teen volunteers. Through Extension/4-H/HSTA programs, 24 dyads/per state will be recruited to participate in the 8-session iCook 4-H program. Eb4Cast, the model to be used to track the feasibility of broad dissemination will be tested during the Dissemination Study. The iCook program and evaluation tools will be prepared for final transition for Extension programming.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? iCook 4-H Program, an out-of-school culinary and physical activity program for youth and their main food preparer, was conducted. • Throughout the Intervention Study, over 30% of youth and 60% of adults were overweight/obese (n=220 dyads; youth mean age=9.8±0.6 years). Treatment youth increased program evaluation scores from baseline to 4 months (P=0.001), maintained at 12 months (P=0.001) and differed from controls at 4 months (p=0.003). • Most children (67%) ate breakfast every morning; 85% of evening meals were eaten at home. Macronutrient content of meals was on average: 17% protein, 49% carbohydrate, and 35% fat; with 13% of calories coming from saturated fat. An average of 7 tsp. of added sugar, 1.8 cups of dairy, .8 cups vegetables, and 1.6 cups fruit were consumed per day. • Accelerometer derived moderate physical activity (r=0.2, P=0.02), vigorous physical activity (r=0.3, P=0.003), and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (r= 0.3, P= 0.008) were positively correlated with quality of life. There were no associations between sedentary time or light physical activity and quality of life. • Youth reported that they spent more quality time with their family, were more active in meal planning, recipe selection, grocery shopping, table setting, and helping parents prepare family meals. Adults reported that the program helped them with considering healthy meal planning, cooking more with their children, and with communicating more during meals and less TV time. • The top five identified influencers of positive family meal experience included: enjoying the food served, being together, having fun and not fighting, good conversations, and meal-time not being inhibited by time constraints. These factors were confirmed by both positive and negative journal entries. • A 3-pronged approach to evaluation was utilized to measure change (Program Evaluation), monitor program feedback (Process Evaluation), and test Fidelity of Implementation (FOI). Based on psychometric testing, the online program evaluation tool, developed to measure change in iCook 4-H focal areas, was reduced to 34 questions (α=0.94) for youth and 15 questions (α=0.89) for adults. Session feedback and monitoring of at home activities was determined using the final version of the online process evaluation surveys (final questions: youth=13; adult=21; leader=11). Fidelity of implementation was tested. Evaluators of FOI reported session objectives were met 91% and focal areas were covered 90% of the time. Treatment vs. control youth increased program evaluation scores for iCook focal areas (P=0.003). Treatment vs. control adults reported greater increases in family meals (P=0.005) and youth involvement in planning/preparing meals (P=0.009). Based on process evaluation, dyads reported more cooking, eating and playing together as the program progressed. Adults reported their child's culinary skills were enhanced at each session. • iCook was tested for dissemination with a total of 27 dyads across three states. Youth reported increases in cooking by themselves (P=0.007), cooking with help (P=0.022), kitchen skill self-efficacy (P=0.024), using technology with help (P=0.004); trend in goal creation and completion (P=0.088); no change in physical activity. Increases were also shown in total program outcome scores in adults from pre- to post-test.

Publications

  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Merfeld C, Kattelmann K, Meendering J, Mathews D, Olfert M, White J, Colby S, Meade R, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, White A. iCook 4-H: Report of the correlation between quality of life measures and physical activity in 9-10 year old children. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2014;46:S110.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Miller, A, Franzen-Castle, L, White, A, Mathews, D, Colby, S, Meade, R, Kattelmann, K, Kabala, C, Olfert, M, White, J. Characteristics and kitchen proficiency of adults at intervention baseline: iCook 4-H. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2014;46:S186.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Franzen-Castle, L, Krehbiel, M, White, A, Mathews, D, Yerxa, K, Colby, S, Meade, R, Kattelmann, K, Kabala, C, Olfert, M, Flanagan, S. Assessing effectiveness of the implementation of a 12-week curriculum for youth and adults: iCook 4-H. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2014;46:S104.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Bates J, White A, Mathews D, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M. Coming together: Family relationships and healthy food preparation. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2014;46:S184.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Olfert M, Lilly C, White J, Flanagan S, Franzen Castle L, Krehbiel M, Colby S, Meade R, Kattelmann K, Wilson-Sweebe K, Mathews D, White A. Health disparities including and not including race correlate to quality of life: iCook 4-H. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2014;46:S124.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: White J, Wells A, Colby S, Donaldson A, Franzen-Castle L, Miller A, Kattelmann K, Merfeld C, Mathews D, White A, Olfert M. Collecting highlights from leaders about a cooking and physical activity program for family dyads: iCook 4-H. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2014;46:S123.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Colby S, Meade R, Donaldson A, Franzen-Castle L, Plaggemeyer A, Kattelmann K, Merfeld C, Mathews D, Olfert M, Smith E, White A. Child food intake and habits at baseline: iCook 4-H. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2014;46:S110.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Meade R, Colby S, Donaldson A, Franzen-Castle L, Plaggemeyer A. Kattelmann K, Kabala C, Mathews D, Olfert M, White J, White A. Influencers of family meal experience: iCook 4-H. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2014;46:S102.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Mathews D, Yerxa K, Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel M, Aguirre T, Colby S, Meade R, Kattelmann K, Kabala C, Olfert M, Wells A, White A. Fidelity of implementation of a 4-H program to promote culinary skills and family meals for obesity prevention: iCook 4-H. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2014;46:S152.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2014 Citation: White A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M. iCook 4-H: A program to promote culinary skills and family meals. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2014; 46:S199-S200.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Smith E, Root A, Flanagan F, Colby S, Meade R, Franzen-CastleL, Aguirre T, Kattelmann K, Kabala C, White A, Mathews D, Olfert M. Assessing blood pressure and quality of life in 9- to 10-year-old children:icook 4-H Pilot Study. J Nutr Educ Behav.2014; 46:S123-S124.
  • Type: Journal Articles Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Sorenson A, Kattelmann K, Meendering J Kabala C, Olfert M, Colby S, White A. Assessment of Physical Activity in 9 to 10-Year-Old Children Participating in the Family-Centered Intervention. Top. Clin.Nutr 2015;30(2):159-166.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Brown, M. R. 2014 Assessing Family Dynamics of iCook 4-H Participants in a 5-State Pilot Study. (Masters Thesis) University of Maine, Orono, ME.
  • Type: Websites Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: www.myicook4h.com
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Mathews D, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Colby S, Olfert M, White A. Use of a systematic 3-pronged evaluation to measure, monitor, and test fidelity of the 5-state iCook 4-H program. FASEB J. 2015:29:S395.8.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2015 Citation: Kabala C. 2015. iCook 4-H: The relationship between the BLOCK Kids Physical Activity Screener and accelerometer derived physical activity in 9-10 year old children.(Master's Thesis) South Dakato State University, Orono, ME.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Ford, Amber. 2014. Association of cooking self-efficacy and frequency of iCook 4-H youth participants with dietary quality and BMI at baseline. (Master's Thesis) University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Meade R, Colby S, White A, Mathews D, Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel M, Kattelmann K, Kabala C, White J, Olfert M. iCook 4-H: Childhood BMI is associated with family meal frequency. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2014;114(9), A64.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Accepted Year Published: 2015 Citation: Olfert M, Famodu O, White J, Barr M, Hagedorn M, Meade R, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, Kabala C, Kattelmann K, Mathews D, White A. Blood pressure and quality of life in 9-11 year old youth and adult dyad pairs over one year: iCook 4-H. 2015. J Nutr Educ Behav.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Accepted Year Published: 2015 Citation: Merfeld C. M, Kattelmann K. K, Meendering J. R, Mathews D. R, Olfert M. D, White J, Colby S. E, Randa M. L, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, White A. A. iCook 4-H: Report of the accelerometer derived physical activity in 9-10 year old children from baseline to post. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2015;47:S--.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Accepted Year Published: 2015 Citation: Randall J, Yerxa K, Allan T, Brison C, Fenton A, Goertz J, Lindley V, Spurling D, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M, Mathews D, White A. Piloting iCook 4-H prepares program for community dissemination. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2015;47:S--.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Accepted Year Published: 2015 Citation: Hagedorn R, Olfert M. D, White J, Famodu O, Barr M, Hanks S, Chester A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattlemann K, White A. Using high school leaders in dissemination and implementation through the Health Sciences Technology Academy (HSTA): iCook 4-H Study. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2015;47:S--.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Accepted Year Published: 2015 Citation: White A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M. Out-of-school culinary and physical activity program for children and their main food preparer: iCook 4-H Year 3. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2015; 47: S--
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Accepted Year Published: 22015 Citation: Olfert M. D, Scatterday A, Famodu O, White J, Barr M, Hagerdorn R, Meade R, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Wilson-Sweebe K, Kattelmann K, Yerxa K, White A. Health disparate score change over 12 months: iCook 4-H Study. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2015;47:S--.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Accepted Year Published: 2015 Citation: White J, Olfert M. D, Famodu O, Barr M, Merfeld C, Kattelmann K, Franzen-Castle L, Aguirre T, Colby S, Manuel L, Mathews D, White A. Cooking, mealtime & physical activities incorporated in the home environment one year after initial intervention session: iCook 4-H Study. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2015;47:S--.


Progress 08/01/13 to 07/31/14

Outputs
Target Audience: The target audience was 240 dyads from the 5 participating states. The mean age of youth was 9.36±0.6 (52% female). Based on reported race, 65% were white; 14% Hispanic, 13% black, 3% Native American, 1% Asian, and 2 % other. On average youth participants had a BMI in the “normal” range (19.44±4.2). Over sixty percent of youth were in the 5th – 85th BMI percentile and self-reported as pre-pubertal. The mean age of adults was 38.84±8.1. They were considered overweight (29.59±7.5) and 42% reported participating in government assistance programs. Changes/Problems: Recruiting the sample. Recruitment for the intervention study occurred between May and August 2013. Multiple recruitment strategies were used including radio advertising, delivering flyers to summer camps, and attending school open houses. Recruitment was difficult and slightly less than half of the desired number was recruited across the 5 states. Based on feedback from recruiters, barriers to participation were identified and used in training for the dissemination study. Pilot Dissemination Study. As identified in a previous section of this report, a Pilot Dissemination Study will be implemented in year 3. It was not planned when the grant was written but is considered essential to test the protocols for moving from a research setting to a community based setting. What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided? The opportunity for training has occurred for student researchers, and community collaborators who are part of the iCook project, as well as all principal investigators. They were trained in research: Using the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI Program)training with a focus on what research with human subjects is, what is important to know about this type of research and the importance of promoting the quality of and public trust in the research when the participants are humans. Student researchers also were trained in another required training, Responsible Conduct of Research Workshop with an emphasis on key principles of conducting research including honesty, recognition of prior work, confidentiality, disclosure of conflicts of interest, compliance with requirements; protecting subjects; sharing resources and being open and fair in communications. Researchers and intervention leaders were trained on curriculum implementation. These trainings were recorded for future use. All researchers who conduct assessments are trained on physical measurements and must be certified that they conduct assessments within .8 interrater reliability in order to be able to assess study participants. Researchers conducting assessments are trained on how to use digital equipment to assess blood pressure and to instruct youth participants on the use of accelerometers. Doctoral students are trained in statistical techniques by working with the consultant statisticians. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest? Dissemination occurred in year 2 by the presentation of 6 abstracts at 5 national (Annual Meeting for the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior, 2013; Experimental Biology, 2014) and one international meeting (International Congress of Nutrition, 2013). Oral presentations have been made at state professional meetings. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals? During the next reporting period, the iCook multistate team will pilot the Dissemination Study planned for 2015. A pilot was not mentioned in the original grant and is considered an important addition to year 3 to test the protocols for transitioning from a research setting to implementation as a community program. Pilot Dissemination Study: Year 3. The Dissemination Study will occur in Year 4 and is a treatment only study design with assessments at 0 and 4 months designed to test the sustainability of iCook 4-H when implemented by a community leader with assistance from 1-3 volunteers. The pilot will occur in fall 2014 with youth-adult dyads (up to 12 pairs/state, with a minimum of 1 group of 2 dyads/state). Similar protocols will be used as in the Intervention Study to recruit 9-10 year old youth and their primary adult meal preparers, focusing on rural, diverse low-income populations. Extension personnel will have the major role of recruiting between June and August 2014. Similar protocols will also be used to implement the Dissemination Study in 2015. Modifications and/or changes that have occurred to allow for the transition from a research setting to a community setting and are as follows: Study website was copied to obtain a website for the dissemination work going forward and to maintain a separate study website for the Intervention Study. Intervention curriculum was modified from 6 to 8 sessions due to including assessments in the time frame of the sessions (previously assessments were conducted outside the intervention curriculum setting). Based on process evaluation, session 1 had too much to cover in one 2-hr period, so the technology content was transferred to the new session 1. Modification of timing of individual session components was done to be more in line with actual time needed. Recipe modification occurred and substitutionary ideas were included. Videos for use on the website were produced to teach physical activity concepts to the youth to reinforce session content. Program evaluation, but no research assessments, will be collected as part of the Pilot Dissemination Study. Pilot Dissemination Study Objectives The objectives of the Pilot Dissemination Study are to investigate the impact of iCook 4-H on the following: In youth confidence in culinary skills without help from parent, culinary skills with help from parent, number of family meals per week willingness to try new foods. increase self-reported physical activity In adults increase in food preparation number of family meals per week culinary confidence and enjoyment dyad interaction in meal planning and preparation increase self-reported physical activity Primary Outcome Measures—Youth Program Evaluation. Tools for program evaluation have been developed, tested and refined and psychometric work is continuing on the primary program evaluation tools. Program evaluation can be simply defined as the process of determining the merit of a program.150-152 Program evaluations focus on decisions and action. Decision questions focus on determining the effectiveness of the program.153 Action questions use the answers from decision questions and allow the change to happen. Program evaluation allows for improvement in the program. This information comes from both researchers and program participants. Program Evaluation Outcome Measurement. Based on work to date, the youth program outcome measure is a 21-item instrument with five subscales measuring physical activity, confidence in culinary skills without help from parent, culinary skills with help from parent, family meals, and willingness to try new foods. Confirmatory analysis will be completed in June 2014. Additional confirmatory analysis will be completed over the remaining grant period to create a strong, valid, and reliable instrument for dissemination. The measure will be administered at months 0 and 4 and is designed take about 10 minutes. Primary Outcome Measures-Adult Program Evaluation Outcome Measurement. Based on similar psychometric testing as for the youth instrument, the adult instrument has been modified to be a 15-item instrument with four subscales measuring physical activity, food preparation and family meals, culinary confidence and enjoyment, and dyad interaction in meal planning and preparation. The instrument will be administered at months 0 and 4 and is being designed to take about 10 minutes. Process Evaluation Process evaluation instruments for youth, adults and leaders have been modified from those used during the intervention study. Modifications included using the same questions at each session for both the youth and adults to allow for ease of analysis and the ability to make dyad comparisons. Youth, adults, and leaders will all complete their survey, designed to take 5-10 minutes, at the end of each session. Leaders will have access to their class anonymous responses for use in future session planning. Fidelity Evaluation Following testing in the pilot intervention, the fidelity instrument was implemented during the intervention study. It included six- session specific forms for each of the six sessions. Two additional forms are being developed to accommodate the 8-session pilot dissemination. The instrument is designed to measure how closely the delivered curriculum is to the intended implementation. Components measured include program timing, achievement of session objectives, youth and adult involvement/engagement, and adequacy of program materials. To measure fidelity, an independent assessor, observes a session, completing the form as the session unfolds and the time of evaluation is equal to the time of the session, i.e., 2 hours for a 2 hour session. For the pilot dissemination, each state will complete the fidelity instrument on 8 different sessions. Demographic instrument. Demographic information such as sex, age, race, marital status, income, and education will be assessed using the form used for the Intervention Study. Demographic information, as applicable, will be collected for the youth and adult. Training. Researchers have designed an online training using AdobeConnect recordings and eXtension moodle courses to train all leaders in program delivery. All curriculum documents (leader guide, participant guide, study manual) will be hosted on the moodle course. The first training for leaders and student researchers was conducted on May 28, 2014. The training was recorded for future use. [Recording I: https://connect.unl.edu/p8vdls37vbz/; Recording II: https://connect.unl.edu/p4wiy4weul9/] iCook Website. A new URL (myicook4h.com) will be used for the dissemination website and modified to meet the needs of a community-based program. The ultimate goal is that all curriculum documentation and evaluation materials will be hosted on the website with the ability for any future leaders to easily extract the needed information and data , as well as to continue the online community for iCook youth and adult participants.

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? 1) Conduct the Intervention Study, collecting 0 and 4 month assessments in year 2. The 2-year intervention with 9-10 year old children and their main adult preparer of meals was initiated in fall, 2013. The study design is control-treatment, with a 12 week educational intervention to increase culinary skills, physical activity, and family meals. It includes both direct contact and web-based activities. Pre-post assessments at 0 and 4 months have been gathered and results for baseline include: the sample size was 240 dyads across 5 states. Mean age of adults was 38.8±8.1 years and the mean age of youth was 9.4±0.6 years. Mean BMI of children was in the “normal” range (19.44±4.2); 60% ranged between the 5th – 85th BMI percentile. Based on Tanner Stage for sexual maturity their mean stage, as self-reported, was pre-pubertal. Adults had a mean BMI of 29.6±7.5, classifying them as overweight. About half of adult participants reported poor food safety and grocery shopping habits and lack of meal planning; 42% reported participating in government assistance programs and 55% reported that they seldom ran out of food before the end of the month. Top five influences of pleasurable family meals were: enjoying the food; being together; having fun and not fighting; having good conversations; and mealtime not being inhibited by time constraints. While the majority of children were consuming breakfast (67%), their diets were higher than recommend in saturated fat (13% of calories from saturated fat). Of 220 dyads, correlations between dyads were identified for BMI percentile (p<0.001) and items on family meals and eating habits scales (p<0.05). Based on an assessment of accelerometer data for youth and measures of quality of life, there was a positive correlation between number of minutes spent in moderate physical activity and their report of physical functioning, as being able to walk more than a block and being able to run (r=0.3, p=0.005) 2. Develop the Program Evaluation, including the Program Outcome Measure, Process Evaluation, and Fidelity Assessment. Program outcome evaluation questionnaires are undergoing psychometric testing to create strong, valid and reliable instruments for dissemination. Process evaluation surveys were completed by the children, adults and leaders at the end of each session. Findings included that over the intervention, increasing trends were seen in adult confidence as role models and dyads cooking together. Findings from fidelity testing included: the intervention was delivered as planned; across the 6-lessons, objectives were met 91% of the time; materials provided to the leaders were adequate 96% of the time; based on observation, both adults and youth were rated as “engaged to actively engaged” in the sessions. 3. Develop website activity to build an online community of participants. Using the cameras youth were given for program participation, dyads made videos cooking together, eating together and playing (being physically active) together. Videos were uploaded on the secure study website during the 6 sessions and that activity is to continue for the remainder of the two year study. To help encourage participation, the iCook team developed website challenges for healthful cooking, eating and be physically active. Examples include: “Try steaming up some vegetables both old favorites and new for a delicious, vitamin-packed dish;” “Eat a whole grain each day this week;” Start with 5 squats and add one per day for the week.” All dyads who post videos, pictures, and comments focused on the challenge are entered into a drawing to win monetary prizes.

Publications

  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: Kabala C, Kattelmann K, Koens A, Meendering J, White A, Mathews D, Olfert M, Smith E, Gebremariam Y, Colby SE, Sparks A, Franzen-Castle L, Hall J. iCook 4-H: Assessment of Physical Activity in 9-10 Year Old Children Participating in a Family-centered Pilot Intervention. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2013;45:S69.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: C.M. Kabala, K.K. Kattelmann, J.R. Meendering D.R. Mathews, M.D. Olfert, J.White, S.E. Colby, R.L. Meade, L.D.Franzen-Castle,T.Aguirre, A.A.White. iCook 4-H: Report of the correlation between the Block Kids Physical Activity Screener and accelerometer-derived physical activity in 9-10 year old children. FASAB J 2014;19: LB460.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Olfert M D, White J, Wells A, Franzen-Castle L, Colby S, Kattlemann K, Matthews D, White A. iCook 4-H: Dyad Model (youth/adult pair) used in recruiting for a multistate study, FASEB J. 2014: 28:A262.5.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: White A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M. iCook: A 4-H program to promote culinary skills and family meals for obesity prevention. J Nutr Educ Behav.2013 45:S91.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: Buttarazzi S, Mathews D, Aguirre T, Franzen-Castle L, Shanklin K, Colby S, Kattelmann, Smith E, Olfert M, Yerxa K, White A. iCook 4-H: Piloting a Childhood Obesity Prevention Program- Anthropometrics and Dietary Intake of Children 9-10 Years Old. J. Nutr. Educ. Behav. 2013;45:S76.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Buttarazzi, S. 2014 Assessing anthropometric measurements, maturation stage, and dietary intake of 9-10 year old children in the iCook 4-H pilot study (Masters thesis) University of Maine, Orono, ME.
  • Type: Theses/Dissertations Status: Published Year Published: 2014 Citation: Smith E. Assessing Blood Pressure and Quality of Life in 9-10 year old Children: iCook 4-H Pilot Study. West Virginia University Libraries, Thesis 2014.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2014 Citation: Krehbiel M, White A, Franzen-Castle L. iCook: Engaging youth and adults in a 4-H cooking intervention. National Afterschool Association Convention, New York City, NY. March 2,2014
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2013 Citation: Donaldson A, Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M, White A. Building cooking confidence as a foundation for a healthy diet. Southern Obesity Summit. Nashville, TN. November 18, 2013.
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2013 Citation: Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M, White A. iCook: Development and Pilot Testing of a Cooking Intervention for Youth and Adults. Asia-Pacific Academic Consortium for Public Health in Wuhan, China. October 27, 2013
  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Other Year Published: 2014 Citation: Mathews D, Yerxa K, Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel M, Colby S, Olfert M, Flanagan S. iCook 4-H: What is it and how is it evaluated? Maine Nutrition Network Quarterly Meeting, Orono, ME. May 2, 2014.


Progress 08/01/12 to 07/31/13

Outputs
Target Audience: The participants were dyads (n=48) composed of 9-10 year old youth and their adult primary meal preparer who participated in the iCook 4-H pilot. Youth (female=72%; male=28%) were 47% white, 18% Hispanic, 13% black, 13% Native American, 2% Asian, and 7% other. Of the adults, 70% were married and 84% had at least some college education. Changes/Problems: Nothing Reported What opportunities for training and professional development has the project provided? As indicated previously, one of the objectives for the year was to establish the infrastructure, including protocols and training, for study implementation. Across the 5 states, teams of researchers, graduate and undergraduate students, and Extension personnel at the state and county level were involved in trainings on standardized protocols for conducting anthropometrics, blood pressure, use of accelerometers, and curriculum design and testing. Webinars and conference calls were used to train the research team. The doctoral student at the University of Maine participated in two days of professional development using Drupal, an open source content management platform for building websites. He used that information and worked with a website consulting firm to develop the study website. How have the results been disseminated to communities of interest? Dissemination occurred through the presentation of four papers at Experimental Biology in Boston, MA, in April 2013. Since iCook 4-H is designed as a community-based participatory research project, communities of interest within our states have been reached with research results through advisory committee meetings. What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals? Nothing Reported

Impacts
What was accomplished under these goals? Specifically for year 1, the objectives were met as follows: Develop/modify research materials including Curriculum A six, 2 hour lesson curriculum was developed as the central component of the iCook intervention. The 5-state team adapted two 4-H curricula, Fast Foods and Youth in Motion, added resources to include food safety, family mealtime and MyPlate, and grounded the curriculum in the Social Cognitive Theory and the experiential 4-H learning model. It was packaged into leader and participant binders and included guides, handouts, activities and recipes for each lesson. MyPlate sheets were developed for youth with activities on the back to reinforce lesson objectives. For the pilot test, curriculum trainings were conducted through webinars and phone conferences for lesson leaders and state PIs. Website The website for the iCook 4-H project was developed using Drupal 7 as a content management system. The website was designed to meet the priority areas of the lessons. Sections were created for goal setting and recipe, video, and photo sharing. Rainstorm Consulting reviewed and tested the website prior to use to ensure functionality and adherence to Section 508 compliance. During the pilot, the website was used by all participants. Researchers gathered feedback from participants, and through analysis of Google Analytics. The website is currently undergoing maintenance. Changes are being made to include features that are similar to large social media sites (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube). These changes are being made from the feedback gathered. Cameras for Children Using the 4-H “learn by doing” approach and documenting over time in and out of the curriculum, cameras were distributed to children for them to take videos and still shots to upload to share with others in the research study and for researchers to see children’s self-expression in re-teaching to family and peers. Evaluation Tools Based on preliminary work or the pilot test the following modifications were made The physical activity assessment survey for the youth was changed from the 3D PAR instrument to the 7-item Block physical activity for ease of data collection. Adult assessments were added or modified to provide more information from the adults and to strengthen the ability to study dyad relationships. A family dynamics instrument was pilot tested and two scales, family communication and satisfaction were maintained for the intervention. Additional assessments to use for the intervention are the Adult PEDsQL (Quality of Life) instrument, blood pressure and modified questions about family meals. Program, Process and Fidelity evaluation tools were developed, tested and evaluated. New or existing questions (Adults: n=14; Children: n=24) were used for the program evaluation tool that was given at the pre and post pilot test. Psychometric analysis is occurring with the goal of developing a strong instrument to assess program outcomes for use, not only during the research phase but also, when the curriculum is disseminated in 4-H programming. Process evaluation tools were developed, tested and evaluated. Process evaluation was collected from leaders and dyads at each lesson using an online format which facilitated quick turn-around to leaders across the 5 states for modifications in lessons and lesson to lesson feedback from dyads. Summary results from the process evaluation were displayed as word clouds for evaluation purposes. A tool to measure fidelity of implementation was designed and tested on the final lesson of the pilot program. Modifications are being made to adapt the tool to fit all 6 lessons for the intervention. Process evaluation was collected at each lesson from youth and adult participants and lesson leaders, using online surveys. A fidelity instrument was developed to test for consistency of implementation to the planned lessons and across sites. Pilot test the iCook intervention iCook 4-H was piloted in fall, 2012 with 48 dyads across the 5 states, Maine, Nebraska, South Dakota, Tennessee and West Virginia. Assessments for youth included anthropometrics, blood pressure, physical activity, and surveys on eating habits, quality of life, and family meals. Assessments for adults included surveys on quality of life, family meals, kitchen proficiency, food intake, child feeding practices and family dynamics. Based on analysis to date, differences from pre to post for youth were: BMI percentile increased significantly (P<0.03) from pre to post. (Anthropometrics) Quality of life increased based on mean scores on subscales for functioning physically, emotionally, and socially (P<0.05). (PedsQl) Perception of ability to perform kitchen tasks increased, both alone (P<0.02) and with help (P<0.04). (Program Evaluation) Based on analysis to date, differences from pre to post for adults were: Kitchen proficiency increased (P=0.006). (Extension Behavior Checklist) Daily average intake of fruits & vegetables increased (P= 0.0099). (Modified NCI Screener) For child feeding practices, Restriction, the extent to which parents restrict access to food, decreased (p=0.0005). (Birch Child Feeding Questionnaire) Establish inter and intra state steering committees to provide research guidance and decision-making. The interstate steering committee meets monthly by teleconference and met once for a face-to-face meeting in February. This committee functions as the administrative committee for the project and is composed of researchers, students, Extension personnel in nutrition and family and child development, and consultants in Exercise Science and Family Wellness. Intrastate advisory committees have met at least once over the last year. State-specific committees are made up of stakeholders such as 4-H personnel, nurses, state nutrition professionals and dyads. They provide input for state activities such as recruitment flyer designs and timing for the program. In addition, an online 5-state advisory committee meeting was held in May 2013 with representatives from the intrastate advisory committees, including dyads and stakeholders. They reviewed a training video of a lesson and then, using Adobe Connect, provided feedback in a focus group style responding to questions designed using the ARCS model for motivation to learn based on the attributes of Attention, Relevance, Confidence and Satisfaction. Establish the infrastructure, including protocols and training, for study implementation. An excellent infrastructure was established in preparation for the year 2 study implementation. An administrative multidisciplinary team of researchers, Extension personnel and consultants in exercise science and family development has met monthly by conference call and one face-to-face meeting over the first year. Each state PI took lead in one major area and developed protocols, training manuals and/or videos. The study manual was developed in Maine and included the recruitment protocols (Tennessee); blood pressure protocols (West Virginia); physical assessments (Maine); responsibilities of state study coordinators; and copies of all research and program evaluation instruments (Maine). Training webinars and/or videos were developed and used in training for use of accelerometers (South Dakota) and curriculum implementation (Nebraska).

Publications

  • Type: Conference Papers and Presentations Status: Published Year Published: 2013 Citation: Mathews D, Yerxa K, Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel M, Colby S, Meade R, Kattelmann K, Kabala C, Olfert M, Flanagan S, White A. iCook: Use of an online process evaluation to facilitate quality control of a 5-State 4-H program. FASEB J. April, 2013 27: 367.5. Olfert M, Smith E, Flanagan E, Colby S, Shanklin K, White A, Mathews D, Yerxa K, Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel M, Kattelmann K, Koens A. iCook: Lessons learned about recruiting youth and their primary adult food preparer for a 4-H cooking intervention. FASEB J. April 9, 2013 27: 1063.18 Colby S, Franzen-Castle L, Kattelmann K, Olfert M, Mathews D, White A. iCook: Development of a web-based component of a 4-H cooking intervention. FASEB J. April 9, 2013 27: 36.2. Franzen-Castle L, Krehbiel, M, White A, Mathews D, Yerxa K, Colby S, Donalson A, Kattelmann K, Koens A, Olfert M, Flanagan S. iCook: Developing a 4-H curriculum for youth and adults. FASEB J. April 9, 2013 27:1067.9.