Source: OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY submitted to
FORAGE MANAGEMENT AND IMPROVEMENT IN CENTRAL OREGON
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
TERMINATED
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0172488
Grant No.
(N/A)
Project No.
ORE00314
Proposal No.
(N/A)
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
(N/A)
Project Start Date
Aug 1, 2002
Project End Date
Jul 31, 2007
Grant Year
(N/A)
Project Director
Bohle, M. G.
Recipient Organization
OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
(N/A)
CORVALLIS,OR 97331
Performing Department
CENTRAL OREGON AGRICULTURAL RES CTR
Non Technical Summary
The problem is in keeping the forage products econmically sustainable in central Oregon. The purpose of this project will be to provide producers and local, and regional seed company representatives with the latest unbiased production data for the forage species, varieties and cultural practices such as fertility, weed control, diseases, planting dates, seeding rates, and harvest timings.
Animal Health Component
100%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
(N/A)
Applied
100%
Developmental
(N/A)
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
20516991020100%
Goals / Objectives
Identify improved forage species and varieties adapted to the central Oregon region.
Project Methods
Separate replicated trials of forage species will be conducted at the COARC, Powell Butte and Madras, Oregon to evaluate the adaptation of perennial legume species, annual grass species, and perennial grass species varieties for hay and pasture. Soil tests will be performed prior to planting and during the study.The trails will be randomized block design with four replications. Soil tests will be conducted as deemed necessary. Dry matter Yield, lodging, stand persistence, harvest moisture, and height data will be collected for a three to five year period. Trials will be harvested at the appropriate frequency for the various species involved with an end use intented for hay, silage, or pasture.

Progress 08/01/02 to 07/31/07

Outputs
Forage crops (hay and pasture) represents the largest number of acres of all agricultural crops produced in central Oregon. Producers, seed dealers, crop consultants, Extension Agents, and other agency personnel want up to date information on the adaptation of varieties of different species of grasses, alfalfa, and other production and management practices to aid in their economic decision-making. Species and variety selection is important because of economic, climate, soil, pest, and irrigation practice considerations by individual farms and for individual fields. What has been done? New alfalfa variety (48 entries at Madras (2440 ft elevation) and 35 entries at Powell Butte (3180 ft elevation)) and grass species/variety trials (54 at Madras and 51 at Powell Butte) were planted in the Fall of 2003 and will conclude in 2007. The entries will be tested for adaptation to central Oregon. Stand longevity, yield, and other agronomic characteristics will be recorded. Numerous seed companies partially support through testing fees. Grazing intensively of pastures and hay fields in the fall may decrease yield the following spring. The third of four years of a fall management effect (simulated fall grazing - clipping to 1, 2-2.5, and 4 - 5 inch stubble height) on 3-cut and 4-cut tall fescue hay field aftermath, continues, to determine if there are differences in biological yield and economics of the management, if any. More fields in central Oregon are testing deficient in potassium, and sulfur is always deficient. The seventh and final field year of the Potassium and Sulfur Rate Effect on yield, quality, nutrient uptake, and soil nutrients trial was finished (with a 3rd cutting only in 2006). Again no fertilizer was applied to determine how long the previous sulfur fertilizer applications would feed the crop. A $10,000 grant was secured to begin analyzing plant nutrient tissue/uptake and ending soil nutrient testing, analyze the data statistically, and look at economics of potassium and sulfur fertilization. The alfalfa seeding rate trial data will be published in the coming year (2007). Results from trials are extended and published in the Central Oregon Ag Research Center Annual Report, Central Oregon Ag Newsletter (Extension), through crop consultant and producer contacts, and posted to the web.

Impacts
Alfalfa seed marketers and suppliers, producers, and crop consultants rely on the alfalfa and grass variety adaptation trials to help producers with production decisions. Selection of the right variety or species can make the difference of greater than $100 per acre (comparing the highest yielding to the lowest yielding variety of alfalfa or species and variety of grass), annually. Profitability is increased by producing increased higher yield and sometimes a higher quality product to market, and possible longer stand longevity (depending upon pest resistance of alfalfa variety) and management. Grass species (and varieties with-in species) react very differently between 3-cut and 4-cut harvest management, too. Choosing the right grass species and variety for hay vs. pasture can mean the difference of hundreds of dollars per acre. Producers will plant better adapted species and varieties based on the results of this trial. A new winter forage barley variety (of 'Hoody' and 'Strider' parentage)will hopefully be released in the future, which will have at least the same yield, quality, and palatability potential, but with much improved disease resistance (resistance to scald and barley stripe rust). Producers will be able to decrease alfalfa seeding rate costs in the future if they so choose, because of the alfalfa seeding rate trial results.

Publications

  • Bohle, M., and Simmons, R. (June, 2007) Seeding rate effect on three-cut alfalfa forage production. Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center 2006 Annual Report. Oregon State University Agricultural Research Station Special Report 1072. 114-130.
  • Bohle, M. and Simmons, R. On-home web site for COARC 2003 4-Cut Alfalfa Variety Trial: 2004-2007 Results.
  • Bohle, M. and Simmons, R. On-home web site for COARC 2003 3-Cut Alfalfa Variety Trial: 2004-2007 Results.
  • Bohle, M. and Simmons, R. On-home web site for COARC 2003 4-Cut Grass Species and Variety Trial: 2004-2007 Results.
  • Bohle, M. and Simmons, R. On-home web site for COARC 2003 3-Cut Grass Species and Variety Trial: 2004-2007 Results.
  • Bohle, M., and Simmons, R. (June, 2007) Seeding rate effect on four-cut alfalfa forage production. Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center 2006 Annual Report. Oregon State University Agricultural Research Station Special Report 1072. 94-113.


Progress 01/01/06 to 12/31/06

Outputs
Who Cares and Why? Forage crops (hay and pasture) represents the largest number of acres of all agricultural crops produced in central Oregon. Producers, seed dealers, crop consultants, Extension Agents, and other agency personnel want up to date information on the adaptation of varieties of different species of grasses, alfalfa, and other production and management practices to aid in their economic decision-making. Species and variety selection is important becasue of economic, climate, soil, pest, and irrigation practice considerations by individual farms and for individual fields. What has been done? New alfalfa variety (48 entries at Madras (2440 ft elevation) and 35 entries at Powell Butte (3180 ft elevation)) and grass species/variety trials (54 at Madras and 51 at Powell Butte) were planted in the Fall of 2003 adn will conclude in 2007. The entries will be tested for adaptation to central Oregon. Stand longevity, yield, and other agronomic characteristics will be recorded. Numerous seed companies partially support through testing fees. Grazing intensively of pastures and hay fields in the fall may decrease yield the following spring. The third of four years of a fall management effect (simulated fall grazing - clipping to 1, 2-2.5, and 4 - 5 inch stubble height) on 3-cut and 4-cut tall fescue hay field aftermath, continues, to determine if there are differences in biological yield and economics of the management, if any. More fields in central Oregon are testing deficient in potassium, and sulfur is always deficient. The seventh and final field year of the Potassium and Sulfur Rate Effect on yield, quality, nutrient uptake, and soil nutrients trial was finished (with a 3rd cutting only in 2006). Again no fertlizer was applied to determine how long the previous sulfur fertilizer applications would feed the crop. A $10,000 grant was secured to begin analyzing plant nutrient tissue/uptake and ending soil nurtient testing, analyze the data statistically, and look at economics of potassium and sulfur fertlization. The alfalfa seeding rate trial data will be published in the coming year (2007). Results from trials are extended and published in the Central Oregon Ag Research Center Annual Report, Central Oregon Ag Newsletter (Extension), through crop consultant and producer contacts, and posted to the web.

Impacts
Alfalfa seed marketers and suppliers, producers, and crop consultants rely on the alfalfa and grass variety adaptation trials to help producers with production decisions. Selection of the right variety or species can make the difference of greater than $100 per acre (comparing the highest yielding to the lowest yielding variety of alfalfa or species and variety of grass), annually. Profitablity is by producing increased higher yield and sometimes a higher quality product to market, and possible longer stand longevity (depending upon pest resistance of alfalfa variety) and management. Grass species (and varieties with-in species) react very differently between 3-cut and 4-cut harvest management, too. Choosing the right grass species and variety for hay vs. pasture can mean the difference of hundreds of dollars per acre. Producers will plant better adapted species and varieties based on the results of this trial. A new winter forage barley variety (of 'Hoody' partentage)will hopefully be released in the future, which will have at least the same yield, quality, and palatability potential, along with much improved disease resistance (resistance to scald and barley stripe rust). Producers will be able to decrease alfalfa seeding rate costs in the future if they so choose, because of the alfalfa seeding rate trial results.

Publications

  • 2006/01 to 2006/12 No new forage publications during this time period.


Progress 01/01/05 to 12/31/05

Outputs
Who Cares and Why? Forage crops (hay and pasture) represents the largest number of acres of all agricultural crops produced in central Oregon. Producers, seed dealers, crop consultants, Extension Agents, and other agency personell want up to date information on the adaptation of varieties of different species of grasses and alfalfa, and other production and management practices to aid in their economic decision-making. Species and variety selection is important becasue of economic, climate, soil, pest, and irrigation practice considerations by individual farms and for individual fields. What has been done? New alfalfa variety (48 entries at Madras (2340 ft elevation) and 35 entries at Powell Butte (3180 ft elevation)) and grass species/variety trials (54 at Madras and 51 at Powell Butte) were planted in the Fall of 2003. The entries will be tested for adaptation to central Oregon. Stand longevity, yield, and other agronomic characteristics will be recorded. Numerous seed companies partially support through testing fees. Numerous producers across Oregon plant Hoody winter barley for hay, but Hoody is susceptible to scald and barley stripe rust. For the second year in a row, a winter forage barley experimental line was planted at Madras (and Corvallis, Oregon and Tulelake CA) to select a scald and barley stripe rust resistant line to replace the variety Hoody. Fall management of alfalfa is important. Two years of documenting the 2nd to last cutting date effect on the economics of last cutting and following year first cutting yield on older-stand, different fall-dormancy afalfa varieties (FD 1-6) was finished this year. Grazing intensively of pastures and hay fields in the fall may decrease yield the following spring. The second year of a fall management effect (simulated fall grazing - clipping to 1, 2-2.5, and 3.5-6 inch stubble height) on 3-cut and 4-cut tall fescue hay field aftermath, continues, to determine if there are differences in biological yield and economics of the management, if any. More fields in central Oregon are testing deficient in potassium, and sulfur is always deficient. The seventh and final field year of the Potassium and Sulfur Rate Effect on yield, quality, nutrient uptake, and soil nutrients trial was finished. The seventh year, no fertlizer was applied to determine how long the previous sulfur fertilizer applications would feed the crop. A $10,000 grant was secured to begin analyzing plant nutrient tissue/uptake and ending soil nurtient testing, analyze the data statistically, and look at economics of potassium and sulfur fertlization. The alfalfa seeding rate trial data will be published in the coming year. Results from trials are extended and published in the Central Oregon Ag Research Center Annual Report, Central Oregon Ag Newsletter (Extension), through crop consultant and producer contacts, and posted to the web.

Impacts
Alfalfa seed marketers and suppliers, producers, and crop consultants rely on the alfalfa and grass variety adaptation trials to help producers with production decisions. Selection of the right variety or species can make the difference of greater than $100 per acre (comparing the highest yielding to the lowest yielding variety of alfalfa or species and variety of grass), annually. Profitablity is increased through higher yield and quality (more quantity and higher quality product to market) and possible longer stand longevity (depending upon pest resistance of alfalfa variety). Grass species (and varieties with in species) react very diffrently between 3-cut and 4-cut harvest management, too. Choosing the right grass species and variety for hay vs. pasture can mean the difference of hundreds of dollars per acre. A new winter forage barley variety to be hopefully released in the future will have potentially higher quality, yield, and palatability from less disease pressure.

Publications

  • Bohle, M., Ballerstadt, P., and James, S. (2005) Quality and Yield Comparisons of Orchardgrass Varieties in their Fourth Production Year. Central Oregon Ag Research Center 2004 Annual Report. Special Report 1060. June, 2005. Pp. 59-77. Oregon State Univeristy Agricultural Experiment Station, Corvallis, Oregon.
  • Bohle, M., Ballerstadt, P., and James, S. (2005) Quality and Yield Comparisons of Tall Fescue Varieties in their Fourth Production Year. Central Oregon Ag Research Center 2004 Annual Report. Special Report 1060. June, 2005. Pp. 78-96. Oregon State Univeristy Agricultural Experiment Station, Corvallis, Oregon.
  • Bohle, M. and Simmons, R. (2005) First Year Yield and Adaptation of Alfalfa Varieties under a 3-cut Management System. On Web - COARC home page.
  • Bohle, M. and Simmons, R. (2005) First Year Yield and Adaptatation of Alfalfa Varieties under a 4-cut Management System. On Web - COARC home page.
  • Bohle, M. and Simmons, R. (2005) First Year Yield and Adaptation of Grass Species and Varieties under a 3-cut Management System. On Web - COARC home page.
  • Bohle, M. and Simmons, R. (2005) First Year Yield and Adaptatation of Grass Species and Varieties under a 4-cut Management System. On Web - COARC home page.


Progress 01/01/04 to 12/31/04

Outputs
Forage crops (hay and pasture) represent the largest amount of acres of all agricultural crops produced in central Oregon. Producers, seed dealers, crop consultants, Extension Agents, and other agency personell want up-to-date information on the adaptation of varieties of different species of grasses and alfalfa, and other production and management practices to aid their economic decision-making. Species and variety selection is important because of economic, climate, soil, pests, and irrigation practice considerations by individual farms and for individual fields. What has been done? New grass (14 species and 65 varieties), alfalfa (58 varieties), and winter cereal variety (11 entries) forage trials were planted in mid August and late October, 2003 at the Central Oregon Ag Research Center sites of Madras (2340 ft. elevation) and Powell Butte (3180 ft. elevation). The forage entries will be tested for their adaptation to different growing conditions and cutting management (3-Cut at Powell Butte and 4-Cut at Madras) in central Oregon. Stand life (for grass and alfalfa), yield (all), and quality (for cereal forages) and other agronomic characteristics (all) will be recorded. Numerous seed companies support with testing fees. This year a 2 rep trial was superimosed over a 1998 Fall Dormancy (FD 1-6) alfalfa trial at Powell Butte and Madras to determine the effect of 2nd to last cutting date on last cutting yield, and following year first cutting yield (document possible detrimental yield and stand effects from surmised possible differences in non structural carbohydrates in the root) because of fall management. There will be two years of data by first cut, 2005, for the two locations. More fields in central Oregon are testing lower in potassium, and application of sulfur is required. The potassium x sulfur rate effect on alfalfa trial will be run another year (with no additional fertlizer in year seven of the trial). Yield and quality are being documented. Other resources will be needed for soil and plant tissue K and S content, will need to be found. Fall management of tall fescue hay trial was initiated in Fall, 2004. In November of each year plots will be clipped to 1, 2-2.5,and 4 inches stubble height and determine hay yield and stand persistence. Previous forage research on alfalfa (fall dormancy effects on yield and quality), and clover and winter grain mite control deomonstrations was published in the Central Oregon Ag Research Center Annual Report.

Impacts
Alfalfa seed marketers and suppliers, producers, and crop fieldmen rely on the alfalfa and grass variety adaptation trials to help producers with production decisions. Selection of the right variety or species can make the difference of greater than $100 per acre (comparing the highest yielding to the lowest yielding variety of alfalfa or species and variety of grass), annually. Profitablity is increased through higher yield and quality (more quantity and higher quality product to market) and possible longer stand longevity (depending upon pest resistance of alfalfa variety). Grass species (and varieites with in species) react very diffrently between 3-cut and 4-cut harvest management, too. Choosing the right grass species and variety can mean the difference of hundreds of dollars per acre.

Publications

  • Simmons, R., Bassinette, J., and Bohle, M. 2004 Triticale Cereal Testing Trial, Central Oregon 2003. Central Oregon Ag Research Center 2004 Annual Report. Special Report 1053. Pp 63-64. Oregon State University Agricultural Experiment Station. Corvallis, Oregon.
  • Bohle, M., and Simmons, R. Fall Dormancy Effect on Three-Cut First Year Alfalfa Quality and Yield. 2004. Central Oregon Ag Research Center 2004 Annual Report. Special Report 1053. Pp 67-85. Oregon State University Agricultural Experiment Station. Corvallis, Oregon.
  • Bohle, M., and Simmons, R. Fall Dormancy Effect on Three-Cut Alfalfa Production. 2004. Central Oregon Ag Research Center 2004 Annual Report. Special Report 1053. Pp 86-97. Oregon State University Agricultural Experiment Station. Corvallis, Oregon.
  • Bohle, M., and Simmons, R. Fall Dormancy Effect on Four-Cut First Year Alfalfa Quality and Yield. 2004. Central Oregon Ag Research Center 2004 Annual Report. Special Report 1053. Pp 98-121. Oregon State University Agricultural Experiment Station. Corvallis, Oregon.
  • Bohle, M., and Simmons, R. Fall Dormancy Effect on Four-Cut Alfalfa Production. 2004. Central Oregon Ag Research Center 2004 Annual Report. Special Report 1053. Pp 122-133. Oregon State University Agricultural Experiment Station. Corvallis, Oregon.
  • Bohle, M., and Fisher, G. 2004. Occurance and Attempts to control Clover and Winter Grain Mites in Central Oregon Grass Pasture and Hay Fields. 2004. Central Oregon Ag Research Center 2004 Annual Report. Special Report 1053. Pp 134-137. Oregon State University Agricultural Experiment Station. Corvallis, Oregon.


Progress 01/01/03 to 12/31/03

Outputs
Forage crops (hay and pasture) represent the largest amount of acres of all agriculural crops produced in central Oregon. Producers, seed dealers, crop consultants, Extension Agents, and other agency personnel want up-to-date information on the adaptation of varieties of different species of grasses and alfalfa, and other production and management paractices to aid their economic decision-making. Species and variety selection is important because of economic, climate, soil, pests, and irrigation practice considerations by indvidual farms and for individual fields. What has been done? New grass, alfalfa, and winter cereal variety forage trials were planted in late summer - early Fall, 2003, at the Central Oregon Ag Research Center sites of Madras (2340' elevation) and Powell Butte (3180' elevation). The forage entries will be tested for their adaptation to different growing conditions in Central Oregon. Longevity (for grass and alfalfa), yield, quality (for the cereal forages) and other important agronomic characteristics will be recorded. Numerous seed companies support with testing fees. Seeding rates of alfalfa have been slowly increasing over the years. A seeding rate trial was planted to test the elasticity of the alfalfa plant over a range of seeding rates. This trial is one of some of the on-going trials which also include Alfalfa Fall Dormancy trials at Powell Butte and Madras to be completed in 2003 or 2004. To date, the first 4 years of results have been presented at producer meetings and published locally. The Fall Dormancy trial data will be compiled in the winter of 2003/2004. This year a non-replicated 2nd-to-last cutting date effect on last cutting alfalfa yield trial was superimposed on the two 1998-planted alfalfa variety trials at Powell Butte and Madras. First cutting yield in 2004 will be documented to determine any detrimental effect on first cutting yield from the previous years harvest management (possible detrimental yield and stand effects from possible differences in root carbohydrates). More and more forage fields in central Oregon are testing lower in potassium, and application of sulfur is a needed practice. The potassium x sulfur rate effect on alfalfa trial has completed its fifth year. Yield and quality data will be compiled in the winter of 2003/2004 and more funds will be sought for nutrient and quality testing, based on the preliminary results. Previous forage research on alfalfa varieties yield repsonse under 3-cut and 4-cut harvest management, and spring cereal forage varieties for central Oregon and winter cereal forage varieties for central Oregon was published in the Central Oregon Ag Research Center 2003 Annual Report and results have been presented at various producer meetings. A local handout of the T-Sum N Fertilizer Effect on Grass Pasture and Hay trial was prepared and extended to local producers. The data need to be statistically analyzed and published.

Impacts
Alfalfa seed marketers and suppliers, producers, and crop fieldmen rely on the alfalfa and grass variety adaptation trials to help producers with production decisions. Selection of the right variety or species can make the difference of greater than $100 per acre (comparing the highest yielding to the lowest yielding variety of alfalfa), annually. Profitablity is increased through higher yield and quality (more of and higher quality product to market) and possible longer stand longevity (depending upon pest resistance of variety). The Alfalfa Seeding Rate trial has shown very little difference in yield in alfalfa from 8-32 lbs/acre bulk seeding rate over 5 years of testing at the two test sites. Seed cost is one of the lowest input costs for producers, when amortized over the life of the stand. But, the data proves that reduced seeding rates may be utilized under proper management, thus reducing dollar inputs for establishing alfalfa fields, if producers want to reduce establishment costs.

Publications

  • Bohle, M., Ballerstedt, P., Dovel, R., Karow, R., and Hannaway, D. 2003. Winter Cereal Forage Varieties for Central Oregon. Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center 2002 Annual Report. Special Report 1046. Pp. 77-105. Oregon State University Agricultural Experiment Station, Corvallis Oregon
  • Bohle, M., and Bafus, R. 2003. Three-Cut Irrigated Alfalfa Variety Trial: 1999-2002 Results. Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center 2002 Annual Report. Special Report 1046. Pp. 115-125. Oregon State University Agricultral Experiment Station, Corvallis Oregon
  • Bohle, M., and Bafus, R. 2003. Four-Cut Irrigated Alfalfa Variety Trial: 1999-2002 Results. Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center 2002 Annual Report. Special Report 1046. Pp. 126-137. Oregon State University Agricultral Experiment Station, Corvallis Oregon
  • Bohle, M., Ballerstedt, P., Dovel, R., Karow, R., and Hannaway, D. 2003. Spring Cereal Forage Varieties for Central Oregon. Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center 2002 Annual Report. Special Report 1046. Pp. 51-76. Oregon State University Agricultural Experiment Station, Corvallis Oregon


Progress 01/01/02 to 12/31/02

Outputs
Forage production (hay and pasture) is the largest occupier of agriculutral land in Central Oregon. Producers and seed suppliers need to be kept abreast of the new varieties, seeding rate recommendations, and fertilty management. Two alfalfa variety, two seeding rate,and two fall dormancy (FD) trials were planted in August of 1998 at COARC, Madras (4 cut harvest management and 2330 feet in elevation) and Powell Butte (3 cut harvest management and 3180 feet in elevation), Oregon. A potassium x sulfur rate (4 rate of K x 3 rate of S) effect on Alfalfa trial was planted at Powell Butte in 1998. Four years of harvest data (yield, stem density, plant moisture, and cutting dates) have been compiled. In Grant County (Seneca), there is a small valley with high pH, soluble salts, sodium, and water table. Forage production has been maximized under present management, but potential could be greater. In the spring of 2000, different rates (0, 1000, 2000, 4000, 6000 lb/ac) of sulfur were applied (tilled and non-tilled, each replicated four times) to the soil. Legumes and grasses were broadcast over the trial area. The site will be monitored long term for change in soil pH, shift in forage species, and yield potential. Alfalfa varieties yield differently on first and last cutting and for annual total. There tends to be little differences between varieties for summer harvests. After three years, there is a total yield difference of 3.9 t/ac and 2.8 t/ac between the top yielding and lowest yield variety at Madras and Powell Butte, respectively. After three years (fourth year not compiled yet), with alfalfa seeding rates of 4 to 32 lb/ac (in 4 lb/ac increments), yields are not different at Powell Butte, but there is a statistical difference at Madras (spread of 2.6 t/ac total yield difference). Stem density differences between seeding rates, while significantly different at the beginning of the trial, have narrowed over time. Four mild winters have not been a good test for the alfalfa fall dormancy (FDs 1-6) trial. All entries have yielded well and stands are adequate. Higher yield on last cutting has correlated well to the higher FDs. No compilation of data, other than annual observation, has occured with the Grant County Sulfur Rate trial. Funding is also still being sought for the Potassium and Sulfur Rate Effect on Alfalfa Production Trial. Harvests have been made, but data not yet compiled.

Impacts
Producers, the ultimate end user of the information, can better match the best variety and seeding rate for their individual fields to be planted to alfalfa, based on variety fall dormancy and winter hardiness ratings, and disease, nematode, and insect resistance, and local research based trial data. This information provides better decision making aids for producers to make their alfalfa production enterprise much more sustainable and profitable. Much of central and eastern Oregon depend upon the past and present COARC forage research information that flows out of this program.

Publications

  • Bohle, M. and Bafus, R. 2002. COARC Powell Butte 1998 Alfalfa Variety Trial: 1999-2001 Results. Electronic Report on COARC Web site.
  • Bohle, M. and Bafus, R. 2002. COARC Powell Butte 1998 Alfalfa Variety Trial: 1999-2001 Results. Western Alfalfa Improvement Conference Web Site (linked from Electronic Report on COARC Web site.)
  • Bohle, M. and Bafus, R. 2002. COARC Madras 1998 Alfalfa Variety Trial: 1999-2001 Results. Electronic Report on COARC Web site.
  • Bohle, M. and Bafus, R. 2002. COARC Madras 1998 Alfalfa Variety Trial: 1999-2001 Results. Western Alfalfa Improvement Conference (linked from Electronic Report on COARC Web site.)
  • Bohle, M. and Bafus, R. 2002. COARC Powell Butte 1998 Alfalfa Variety Trial: 1999-2001 Results. (Handout distributed to local meeetings, producers, seed companies, and Oregon Extension Agents)
  • Bohle, M. and Bafus, R. 2002. COARC Madras 1998 Alfalfa Variety Trial: 1999-2001 Results. (Handout distributed to local meeetings, producers, seed companies, and Oregon Extension Agents)


Progress 01/01/01 to 12/31/01

Outputs
Forage production (hay and pasture) is the largest occupier of agricultural acres in central Oregon. Producers and seed suppliers need to kept abreast of the new varieites, seeding rate recommendations, and fertility management. Two variety, two seeidn rate, and 2 fall dormancy trials, and a potassium x sulfur rate fertility alfalfa trial were planted in August of 1998 at COARC, Madras (4 cut harvest regime) and Powell Butte (3 cut harvest regime). Three years of harvest data (yield, stems per square foot (for seeding rate trial only), cutting dates, plant moisture) have been compiled. In Grant county (Seneca) there is a small valley with high pH, sodium, soluble salts, and water table. Forage production potential has been optimized. In the spring of 2000, differnt sulfur rates were applied (tilled and no-tilled) to affect a decrease in soil pH, and grass and legume species were planted over the trial area to monitor forage species change. Varieties of alfalfa yield differently on first and last cutting, but not on the middle cutting(s). After 3 three years at both sites, there is very little difference in accumulated yield between 4 lb/ac to 32 lb/ac seeding rates (in 4lb/ac increments). Four years of mild winters have not tested the fall dormancy trial; all alfalfa dormancies one-to-six entries are yielding very well and have good stands. No compilation of the potassium x suflur data has occured yet. No funding is yet available for soil and tissue potassium and sulfur, and forage quality testing.

Impacts
Alfalfa seed marketeers and suppliers, and producers rely on the alfalfa variety adaptation and yield testing, along with the fall dormancy and pest ratings information. Producers and crops consultants are utilizing the information to make a more informed decision on matching variety to idividual fields (depending upon harvest management, soil type, irrigation system, and diseases, isnects, and nematode pests present). Profitability is increased (forage yeild and quality, and stand persistence is increased or maintained) by utilizing this information. No benefit has been documented with the sulfur rate trial in Grant County, yet.

Publications

  • Bohle, M. and S. James (1997) Central Oregon Irrigated Alfalfa Varitey Trials: 1988-1992. Western Alfalfa Improvement Conference: 1997 Alfalfa Variety Trial Results. WAIC 13, March 31. 1998.
  • Bohle, M. (1998) 1996-1998 Irrigated Alfalfa Variety Trial Results in Central Oregon. Western Alfalfa Improvement Conference: 1998 Alfalfa Variety Trial Results. WAIC 14, March 31, 1999. John Kugler and Mark Smith, Editors.
  • Bohle, M. and R. Bafus. (2001) Central Oregon 1995 Irrigated Alfalfa Variety Trial: 1996-1999 Results. Western Alfalfa Improvement Conference: 2000 Alfalfa Variety Trials Results. WAIC 16. April 1, 2001. George Vandemark, Editor.
  • Bohle, M. and R. Bafus. (2001) COARC Powell Butte 1998 Alfalfa Variety Trial: 1999-2000 Results. Western Alfalfa Improvement Conference: 2000 Alfalfa Variety Results. WAIC 16. April 1, 2001. George Vandemark, Editor.
  • Sexton, P, Bafus, R, and M. Bohle. (2000) Evaluation of Berseem Clover As An Annual Forage in Central Oregon. Central Oregon Ag Research 1999 Annual Report. Special Report 1013. June 2000 Oregon State University Ag Experiment Station.
  • Bafus, R., Sexton, P. and M. Bohle. (2000) Corn Silage Yields in Central Oregon. Central Oregon Ag Research Center 1999 Annual Report. Special Report 1013. June 2000. Oregon State University Ag Experiment Station.
  • Bohle, M. and R. Bafus. (2001) Central Oregon 1995 Irrigated Alfalfa Variety Trial: 1996-1999 Results. Central Oregon Ag Research Center 2000 Annual Report. Special Report 1025. June 2001. Oregon State University Ag Experiment Station.
  • Bafus, R., Sexton, P., and M. Bohle (2001) Corn Silage Potential in Central Oregon. Central Oregon Ag Research Center 2000 Annual Report. Special Report 1025. June 2001. Oregon State University Ag Experiment Station.